20

For those that don't know what I'm talking about, Xcode 6.0 added new features, IBDesignable and IBInspectable.

When you tag your custom views with IBInspectable properties, those properties show up in the Attributes Inspector in IB.

Likewise, when you tag a custom UIView subclass with IBDesignable, Xcode compiles your views and invokes the code to render your view objects right in the Xcode window so you can see what they look like.

The technique for adding IBDesignable and IBInspectable attributes to custom views is pretty much identical in Swift and Objective-C. IBInspectable properties appear in the Interface Builder Attributes Inspector regardless of which language you use to define them.

I've created a category of UIView in Objective-C and an extension of UIView in Swift that promote the borderWidth, cornerRadius, borderColor, and layerBackgroundColor properties of the view's underlying layer as properties of the view. If you change the property, the extension/category does type conversion as required and forwards the change to the layer.

The IBInspectable part works great. I see and can set the new properties in the IB attributes inspector.

I could have sworn that last week, the IBDesignable attribute on my view category/extension was working too, and I could see my custom UIView category rendering in IB with it's changed layer attributes. This week it isn't working.

Was I hallucinating?

Can categories/extensions of existing system classes draw their custom UI in Interface Builder when they are set up with IBDesignable?

7
  • Yes, you can... I believe. What part isn't working? You can't set the properties in the property inspector? Or you can set them in the inspector, but the view doesn't update to reflect the changes?
    – nhgrif
    Apr 27, 2015 at 22:20
  • Hmm, I take that back. It looks like I'm able to get the properties to show up in property inspector, but they don't update on interface builder. However, if I compile and run, the properties are applied.
    – nhgrif
    Apr 27, 2015 at 22:35
  • @nhgrif, I should have been clearer. That's correct. The properties show up in the inspector, I can set their values, and they then work in the running program. However the view does not reflect the changes in the IB window.
    – Duncan C
    Apr 27, 2015 at 22:53
  • IBDesignable does work with custom subclasses. It's looking like it doesn't work with categories/extensions, even though I could swear it was working last week. I wonder if the latest update to Xcode broke it?
    – Duncan C
    Apr 27, 2015 at 22:54
  • 1
    "Is it possible" isn't a good fit for Stack Overflow. How can you answer a "is it possible" question with anything but a "yes" or "no"? Meanwhile a "How do I" question answers your "is it possible" as well as encourages answers which actually demonstrate how its done (which is really what you want as well). See this and this.
    – nhgrif
    Apr 27, 2015 at 23:10

5 Answers 5

26

Since posting this question I've learned that @IBDesignable does not work for class extensions. You can add the tag, but it has no effect.

8
  • 1
    Works: pod 'UIView-IBDesignable' Jul 27, 2016 at 9:19
  • 1
    No it dont. Ive tested it just now. Left view is a subclass of UIView, right - pure UIView. They has same atributes. imgur.com/a/o5Dwn Still looking for decision
    – Dren
    Aug 19, 2016 at 10:38
  • 1
    Worked for me like a charm. However, I noticed that this UIView extension library does NOT work on a standalone UIView - it only applies to subclasses of UIView. Not ideal. @Dren could you try again on a subclass of UIView and confirm if it works or not ?
    – etayluz
    Aug 20, 2016 at 15:56
  • @avishic, do NOT edit someone's answer to change the sense of the answer. If you disagree with the answer then post a comment to that effect, or another answer with the alternative viewpoint. IBDesignable works fine for subclasses, but not for extensions. If you have specific information to the contrary, post your own answer with a concrete example.
    – Duncan C
    Aug 20, 2016 at 22:52
  • @DuncanC, Sorry, no problem. Aug 21, 2016 at 9:07
8

I was able to make it work with code below, but the side effect is that some times IB agent in storyboard crashes because it has to refresh too many UI elements. Restarting Xcode fixes problem temporarily until next crash. Maybe that's the problem OP is facing

@IBDesignable
extension UIView
{

    @IBInspectable
    public var cornerRadius: CGFloat
    {
        set (radius) {
            self.layer.cornerRadius = radius
            self.layer.masksToBounds = radius > 0
        }

        get {
            return self.layer.cornerRadius
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    public var borderWidth: CGFloat
    {
        set (borderWidth) {
            self.layer.borderWidth = borderWidth
        }

        get {
            return self.layer.borderWidth
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    public var borderColor:UIColor?
    {
        set (color) {
            self.layer.borderColor = color?.cgColor
        }

        get {
            if let color = self.layer.borderColor
            {
                return UIColor(cgColor: color)
            } else {
                return nil
            }
        }
    }
}

That's why I am trying to add where clause to reduce subclasses which should extend this functionality: Generic IBDesginables UIView extension

1

@IBDesignable work with UIView extension only in custom class.For example. UILabel is a default sub-class of UIView. It won't work there, but if you make a custom class called MyUILabel subclassing UILabel. assign the MyUILabel class to the Label your are working on. Then your corner radius in UIView extension will work of this MyUILabel. ( I guess the first week it work for you is because you are dealing with some custom class.)

1

I've made this work for my use case by having one @IBDesignable UIView that I set as the top view in my view controller. My particular use case is making ClassyKit styling visible in Interface Builder on the default UIKit views without have to subclass just for that and it's working great.

Here's an example of how you could set it up:

// in Interface Builder set the class of your top view controller view to this
@IBDesignable class DesignableView: UIView {
}

extension UIView {
    open override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
        subviews.forEach {
            $0.prepareForInterfaceBuilder()
        }
    }
}

extension UILabel {
// just an example of doing something
    open override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
        layer.cornerRadius = 8
        layer.masksToBounds = true
        backgroundColor = .red
        textColor = .green
    }
}
1
  • Sigh, it looks like IB doesn't set the runtime attributes on the non-designable classes which is probably going to make this a non starter for my use. Everything appeared to be working in my use case initially but I was only testing a style sheet with a selector on the view class and not a specific style--which depends on having a runtime attribute. Oct 29, 2016 at 19:35
-4

This code block is working well for me.

import UIKit

public extension UIView {
    @IBInspectable public var cornerRadius: CGFloat {
        get {
            return layer.cornerRadius
        }
        set {
            layer.cornerRadius = newValue
            layer.masksToBounds = newValue > 0
        }
    }
}

NOTE It might not work when being imported from a framework. I am trying to find out the reason now.

2
  • Was that the answer to your question, Duncan?
    – Ducky
    Sep 9, 2015 at 13:05
  • This answer shows @IBInspectable which OP has already stated he has working fine. He is specifically asking about @IBDesignable.
    – Adam Johns
    Nov 8, 2015 at 4:42

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