223

I want to have a web page which has one centered word.

I want this word to be drawn with an animation, such that the page "writes" the word out the same way that we would, i.e. it starts at one point and draws lines and curves over time such that the end result is a glyph.

I do not care if this is done with <canvas> or the DOM, and I don't care whether it's done with JavaScript or CSS. The absence of jQuery would be nice, but not required.

How can I do this? I've searched exhaustively with no luck.

  • 2
    I put some thought into how to actually "handwrite" characters and posted my thoughts here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12700731/… – markE Apr 28 '15 at 15:27
  • There's something really similar in a codrops article (with a demo in tympanus) – Francisco Presencia May 4 '15 at 14:40
  • 1
    Back in the days, I was doing this animation in Flash using animated sprite masks. What you need is to animate a mask, which means having it progressively reveal text. The animation would be made of mask frames. – Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan May 4 '15 at 17:49
  • Of course, you would have the benefit of beeing able of breaking text into curves. You would have to do this using before hand uising SVGs and some SVG editor (Illustrator, or whatever else can create a SVG of your text). I don't know if SVGs support masks, but if they do, this would become much easier to animate. – Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan May 4 '15 at 17:54
  • Use SVG and manipulate the SVG code with JavaScript to make the animation. – The Demz May 4 '15 at 19:31
254

I want this word to be drawn with an animation, such that the page "writes" the word out the same way that we would

Canvas version

This will draw single chars more like one would write by hand. It uses a long dash-pattern where the on/off order is swapped over time per char. It also has a speed parameter.

Snapshot
Example animation (see demo below)

To increase realism and the organic feel, I added random letter-spacing, an y delta offset, transparency, a very subtle rotation and finally using an already "handwritten" font. These can be wrapped up as dynamic parameters to provide a broad range of "writing styles".

For a even more realistic look the path data would be required which it isn't by default. But this is a short and efficient piece of code which approximates hand-written behavior, and easy to implement.

How it works

By defining a dash pattern we can create marching ants, dotted lines and so forth. Taking advantage of this by defining a very long dot for the "off" dot and gradually increase the "on" dot, it will give the illusion of drawing the line on when stroked while animating the dot length.

Since the off dot is so long the repeating pattern won't be visible (the length will vary with the size and characteristics of the typeface being used). The path of the letter will have a length so we need to make sure we are having each dot at least covering this length.

For letters that consists of more than one path (f.ex. O, R, P etc.) as one is for the outline, one is for the hollow part, the lines will appear to be drawn simultaneously. We can't do much about that with this technique as it would require access to each path segment to be stroked separately.

Compatibility

For browsers that don't support the canvas element an alternative way to show the text can be placed between the tags, for example a styled text:

<canvas ...>
    <div class="txtStyle">STROKE-ON CANVAS</div>
</canvas>

Demo

This produces the live animated stroke-on (no dependencies) -

var ctx = document.querySelector("canvas").getContext("2d"),
    dashLen = 220, dashOffset = dashLen, speed = 5,
    txt = "STROKE-ON CANVAS", x = 30, i = 0;

ctx.font = "50px Comic Sans MS, cursive, TSCu_Comic, sans-serif"; 
ctx.lineWidth = 5; ctx.lineJoin = "round"; ctx.globalAlpha = 2/3;
ctx.strokeStyle = ctx.fillStyle = "#1f2f90";

(function loop() {
  ctx.clearRect(x, 0, 60, 150);
  ctx.setLineDash([dashLen - dashOffset, dashOffset - speed]); // create a long dash mask
  dashOffset -= speed;                                         // reduce dash length
  ctx.strokeText(txt[i], x, 90);                               // stroke letter

  if (dashOffset > 0) requestAnimationFrame(loop);             // animate
  else {
    ctx.fillText(txt[i], x, 90);                               // fill final letter
    dashOffset = dashLen;                                      // prep next char
    x += ctx.measureText(txt[i++]).width + ctx.lineWidth * Math.random();
    ctx.setTransform(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 3 * Math.random());        // random y-delta
    ctx.rotate(Math.random() * 0.005);                         // random rotation
    if (i < txt.length) requestAnimationFrame(loop);
  }
})();
canvas {background:url(http://i.imgur.com/5RIXWIE.png)}
<canvas width=630></canvas>

  • 19
    Am I the only one going crazy for this? Looks so real, at least, way better than the first answer, and closest to the questioner's question. – Rexford May 4 '15 at 21:01
  • 5
    I ended up using the other answer, because I needed it right away as a quick-n-dirty hack that I used the next day and then never touched again, but I'm accepting this one because it's way closer to what I was looking for. – strugee May 7 '15 at 4:27
  • 1
    So how does it work can someone explain – Muhammad Umer May 8 '15 at 1:26
  • 1
    still dont get it. – Muhammad Umer May 8 '15 at 4:13
  • 1
    okk got it.. learned something new about canvas jsfiddle.net/d6ur2a6b – Muhammad Umer May 8 '15 at 4:30
211

Edit 2019


I created a javascript library that can create realistic animations. It's easy to use and requires a special JSON file that acts as font.

var vara = new Vara("#container", "https://rawcdn.githack.com/akzhy/Vara/ed6ab92fdf196596266ae76867c415fa659eb348/fonts/Satisfy/SatisfySL.json", [{
  text: "Hello World!!",
  fontSize: 48,
  y:10
}, {
  text: "Realistic Animations",
  fontSize: 34,
  color:"#f44336"
}], {
  strokeWidth: 2,
  textAlign:"center"
});
#container {
  padding: 30px;
}
<script src="https://rawcdn.githack.com/akzhy/Vara/16e30acca2872212e28735cfdbaba696a355c780/src/vara.min.js"></script>
<div id="container"></div>

Checkout the Github page for documentation and examples. And Codepen


Previous Answer

The below example uses snap.js to dynamically create tspan elements and then animate each of their stroke-dashoffset.

var s = Snap('svg');
var text = 'Some Long Text'
var len = text.length;
var array = [];
for (var x = 0; x < len; x++) {
  var t = text[x]
  array.push(t);
}
var txt = s.text(50, 50, array)
$('tspan').css({
  'font-size': 50,
  fill: 'none',
  stroke: 'red',
  "stroke-width":2,
  'stroke-dasharray': 300,
  'stroke-dashoffset': 300
})

$('tspan').each(function(index) {
  $(this).stop(true, true).delay(300 * index).animate({
    'stroke-dashoffset': 0,
  }, 300, function() {
    $(this).css('fill', 'red')
  })
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/snap.svg/0.3.0/snap.svg-min.js"></script>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<svg width="500" height="500">
</svg>

Previous Answer


You can do something like this using svg's stroke-dasharray

text {
  stroke-dasharray: 1000;
  stroke-dashoffset: 1000;
  -webkit-animation: draw 8s forwards;
}
@-webkit-keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
text {
  stroke-dasharray: 1000;
  stroke-dashoffset: 1000;
  -webkit-animation: draw 8s forwards;
  -moz-animation: draw 8s forwards;
  -o-animation: draw 8s forwards;
  -ms-animation: draw 8s forwards;
  animation: draw 8s forwards;
}
@-webkit-keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
@-moz-keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
@-o-keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
@-ms-keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
@keyframes draw {
  100% {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
<svg width="500" height="500">
  <text x="100" y="80" fill="none" stroke="black" stroke-width="1" font-size="50">Some text</text>
</svg>

Without keyframes animation you can do something like this

<svg width="500" height="500">
  <text x="100" y="80" fill="none" stroke="black" stroke-width="5" font-size="50"  stroke-dasharray="1000"
  stroke-dashoffset="1000">Some text
  <animate attributeName="stroke-dashoffset"
    from="1000"
    to="0" 
    dur="8s"
      fill="freeze">
          
      </animate> </text>
</svg>

And for IE support you can use jquery/javascript

$('text').animate({
    'stroke-dashoffset':'0'
},8000)
text {
  stroke-dasharray: 1000;
  stroke-dashoffset: 1000;
  }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<svg width="500" height="500">
  <text x="100" y="80" fill="none" stroke="black" stroke-width="1" font-size="50" 
 >Some text
  </text>
</svg>

  • 3
    Wow, that's really interesting. I've taken your original code snippet and improved it somwhat by removing duplicate CSS properties, using percentage-based offsets and dasharray values, and changing the stroke width to make it more apparent how the code is working: jsfiddle.net/Ajedi32/gdc4azLn/1 Feel free to edit any of those improvements into your answer if you want. – Ajedi32 Apr 28 '15 at 13:52
  • 2
    this is a one epic solution for this question, SVG is better than canvas (+1) as far that in case the browser doesn't support it it will show the text instead. – Jeffery ThaGintoki May 4 '15 at 14:50
  • 3
    @JefferyThaGintoki you can do this with canvas as well, just place the text between the canvas tags, if canvas isn't supported the text (or animated gif as in the other answer shows in the body text) will appear instead. If the browser does not support canvas it will probably not support svg either. – torox May 4 '15 at 22:58
  • 1
    I think the use of SVG text is great, however i'm wondering, is it possible to add the fill at some point? just the outline of the letters don't look nice in all projects, cheers! and of course +1 to this answer – randomguy04 Aug 30 '16 at 18:14
  • 1
    @randomguy04 Check the first snippet, i have edited it to add a fill effect. It is done by adding $(this).css('fill', 'red') as a callback to the animation – Akshay Aug 31 '16 at 3:17
2

Only CSS :

@keyframes fadein_left {
  from {
    left: 0;
  }
  to {
    left: 100%;
  }
}

#start:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0%;
  opacity: 0.7;
  height: 25px;
  background: #fff;
  animation: fadein_left 3s;
}
<div id="start">
  some text some text some text some text some text
</div>

protected by web-tiki May 4 '15 at 15:09

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