62

I have the following setup:

final OkHttpClient okHttpClient = new OkHttpClient();
okHttpClient.setReadTimeout(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
okHttpClient.setConnectTimeout(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

RestAdapter.Builder builder = new RestAdapter.Builder()
        .setEndpoint(ROOT)
        .setClient(new OkClient(okHttpClient))
        .setLogLevel(RestAdapter.LogLevel.FULL);

I am trying to handle the situation in which my server is down and the user gets a connection timeout exception, this is my logging:

java.net.SocketTimeoutException: failed to connect to /192.168.0.53 (port 3000) after 5000ms

Full logging: http://pastebin.com/gscCGb7x

Is there a way to route this into the retrofit failure method so I can handle it over there?

Thanks in advance!

4
  • In my app, I do get SocketTimeoutExceptions passed to my failure method wrapped in RetrofitExceptions. Are you sure that you're not getting them there? They may also be logged elsewhere, but they should be passed to failure(). Apr 28, 2015 at 14:08
  • Hmm very weird, I did some debugging and now it does work :S.
    – Jdruwe
    Apr 28, 2015 at 14:17
  • 1
    Hi jdruwe, could you manage to catch the connection exception? I too want to do the same. Thanks
    – cgr
    Nov 18, 2015 at 8:18

8 Answers 8

61

For Retrofit 2

Define a listener in your web service instance:

public interface OnConnectionTimeoutListener {
    void onConnectionTimeout();
}

Add an interceptor to your web service:

public WebServiceClient() {
    OkHttpClient client = new OkHttpClient();
    client.setConnectTimeout(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    client.setReadTimeout(30, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    client.interceptors().add(new Interceptor() {
        @Override
        public Response intercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
            return onOnIntercept(chain);
        }
    });
    Retrofit retrofit = new Retrofit.Builder()
            .baseUrl(BASE_URL)
            .addConverterFactory(GsonConverterFactory.create())
            .client(client)
            .build();
    webService = retrofit.create(WebService.class);
}

Enclose your intercep code with try-catch block and notify listener when exception happens:

private Response onOnIntercept(Chain chain) throws IOException {
    try {
        Response response = chain.proceed(chain.request());
        String content = UtilityMethods.convertResponseToString(response);
        Log.d(TAG, lastCalledMethodName + " - " + content);
        return response.newBuilder().body(ResponseBody.create(response.body().contentType(), content)).build();
    }
    catch (SocketTimeoutException exception) {
        exception.printStackTrace();
        if(listener != null)
            listener.onConnectionTimeout();
    }

    return chain.proceed(chain.request());
}
23
  • 2
    This interceptor is great, but whe TimeoutException occurs in my subscriber's onError(Throwable t) i get this: t.getMessage() = "network interceptor com.test.presentation.application.di.AppRestModule$2@2320fd48 must call proceed() exactly once". Is that OK? Or maybe we should not call proceed second time?
    – Illia K.
    Mar 29, 2016 at 8:01
  • 1
    @Olcay Ertaş - Great answer! Curious on how you get/set lastCalledMethodName for your logging, would you mind sharing?
    – Codeversed
    Dec 27, 2016 at 19:25
  • 1
    @OlcayErtaş chain.proceed(chain.request()) will be called two times! Is it ok?
    – Khan
    Apr 20, 2017 at 12:56
  • 4
    Where does UtilityMethods.convertResponseToString(response); come from? Apr 20, 2017 at 22:07
  • 2
    UtilityMethods.convertResponseToString(response) - what does this exactly do?
    – Alberto M
    Nov 15, 2017 at 15:41
53
@Override
public void onFailure(Call call, Throwable t) {
    if(t instanceof SocketTimeoutException){
        message = "Socket Time out. Please try again.";
    }
}
4
  • Can you please let me know what about to handle the connectivity exception? Mar 14, 2018 at 10:15
  • for me throwable instanceof UnknownHostException work! Feb 4, 2019 at 8:47
  • So you say that in onResponse there is no chanse to have timeout?
    – Mahdi
    Feb 16, 2019 at 9:57
  • @Kenji from my tests, it seems to always go to onFailure
    – Aba
    Mar 14, 2019 at 8:03
17

In case someone come here with Kotlin/Coroutines facing the same issue, add an error handler to your coroutines scope:

CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.IO).launch(handler) {

while the handler by itself looks like:

val handler = CoroutineExceptionHandler { _, exception ->
    Log.t("Network", "Caught $exception")
}
1
  • Yup this is correct for Kotlin coroutines. Even if you put your whole code within a try catch it will not catch the exception if you have used a coroutine. In that case this is the correct approach.
    – nuwancy
    Sep 9 at 11:04
4

None of the answers quite worked for me but they led me in the right direction. See below how I did it in Kotlin.

You can either throw the exceptions in the ErrorInterceptor and catch them in your api call function:

class ErrorInterceptor : Interceptor {

    override fun intercept(chain: Chain): Response {

        val request = chain.request()

        try {
            val response = chain.proceed(request)
            val bodyString = response.body!!.string()

            return response.newBuilder()
                .body(bodyString.toResponseBody(response.body?.contentType()))
                .build()
        } catch (e: Exception) {
            when (e) {
                is SocketTimeoutException -> {
                    throw SocketTimeoutException()
                }

               // Add additional errors... //

            }
        }
    }

Or bundle exceptions with a response object; something like this:

class ErrorInterceptor : Interceptor {

    override fun intercept(chain: Chain): Response {

        val request = chain.request()

        try {
            val response = chain.proceed(request)
            val bodyString = response.body!!.string()

            return response.newBuilder()
                .body(bodyString.toResponseBody(response.body?.contentType()))
                .build()
        } catch (e: Exception) {
            var msg = ""
            val interceptorCode: Int

            when (e) {
                is SocketTimeoutException -> {

                    msg = "Socket timeout error"
                    interceptorCode = 408

                }

               // Add additional errors... //

            }

             return Response.Builder()
                .request(request)
                .protocol(Protocol.HTTP_1_1)
                .code(interceptorCode)
                .message(msg)
                .body("{${e}}".toResponseBody(null)).build()
        }
    }
}

Add the ErrorInterceptor to your okHttpClient:

okHttpClient.newBuilder()
                .addInterceptor(ErrorInterceptor())
                .connectTimeout(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                 // ... //
                .build()

And then something like this in your repository layer:

suspend fun makeAPIRequest(): Resource<ApiResponse> {

        return withContext(ioDispatcher) {

            var response: Response<ApiResponse>? = null

            try {
                response = getResponse()

                // Do additional ops on response here //

            } catch (e: Exception) {

                // Exceptions thrown in ErrorInterceptor will propagate here

            }
        }
    }
3
  • hey, is this working for you full-proof?. I tried it but still, 50% of the time exception is skipped by the interceptor and not caught in case of multiple async API calls.
    – Arpit J.
    Oct 2, 2021 at 3:16
  • @Arpit J. is the interceptor even processing the chain when it does not catch errors? I haven't used this error interceptor for multiple async calls but I would start investigating there. If it does not process the chain, then it's something that has to do with how OkHttp interceptors work, otherwise it has something to do with my implementation. If you manage to solve you issue, I'd be curious to know what was wrong and how you fixed it. Thanks and good luck!
    – SVP
    Oct 2, 2021 at 3:34
  • Sorry but I'm swamped already. If this is an interceptor issue, I don't have any clue how to fix. You should look into something like this: github.com/square/okhttp/issues/3714
    – SVP
    Oct 2, 2021 at 4:51
3

Apparently the exception does get wrapped into a RetrofitException so you can handle it in the failure method.

3
  • 1
    I am using Retrofit 2.2. May I know how can I catch the RetrofitException ? I have an interceptor surrounded by try catch so I am getting SocketTimeoutException handled. But problem is how to let my CallBack know that this particular error is because of the connection timeout ?
    – cgr
    Nov 30, 2015 at 15:56
  • @cgr please llok at my answer. Dec 4, 2015 at 14:57
  • @Oclay, thansk for the response. I finally did that way. Thanks ! ;)
    – cgr
    Dec 4, 2015 at 14:59
3

It's a bit more complicated. With Retrofit you can make API calls that are either synchronous or asynchronous.

If your endpoint returns void and has a callback it is asynchronous. If it returns something and has no callback it's synchronous.

For asynchronous calls you get this exception in the onFailure(...) method of your callback.

For synchronous calls you don't get it at all, unless you wrap your call in a try/catch.

try {
   // your synchronous call goes here  
} catch (RetrofitError error) {
   // handle errors
}

Update: The above answer applies to Retrofit 1.9. Retrofit 2.0 has changed this a lot. If you're wondering about how things now work in Retrofit 2.0, this article gives some pointers http://inthecheesefactory.com/blog/retrofit-2.0/en

2
  • 1
    In Retrofit 2.0, there is no RetrofitError. Oct 27, 2015 at 5:32
  • 1
    Thanks, I updated my answer saying it applies to 1.9 and added a link to an article on how 2.0 works Oct 27, 2015 at 9:27
2

I'm posting this for two reasons:

  1. I personnaly tried increasing connection timeout but, evetually, it doesn't really solve the problem at its root. Besides, user is not supposed to wait for longer than 10 seconds according to this post.
  2. In a real world application, we would rather do our best to implement a solution in as clean as possible way.

So, here's a solution that I came up with in Kotlin. It's inspired from the answer provided by @Olcay Ertaş and combined with Google's recommended architecture for Android apps.

  1. Create a TimeoutInterceptor interface:

     interface TimeoutInterceptor : Interceptor
    
  2. Implement the TimeoutInterceptor interface:

     class TimeoutInterceptorImpl : TimeoutInterceptor {
    
         override fun intercept(chain: Interceptor.Chain): Response {
             if (isConnectionTimedOut(chain))
                 throw SocketTimeoutException()
             return chain.proceed(chain.request())
         }
    
         private fun isConnectionTimedOut(chain: Interceptor.Chain): Boolean {
             try {
                 val response = chain.proceed(chain.request())
                 val content = response.toString()
                 response.close()
                 Log.d(tag, "isConnectionTimedOut() => $content")
             } catch (e: SocketTimeoutException) {
                 return true
             }
             return false
         }
     }
    
  3. In your ApiService interface, add the TimeoutInterceptor to the OkHttpClient builder:

     val okHttpClient = OkHttpClient.Builder()
             .addInterceptor(requestInterceptor)
             // Add timeout interceptor
             .addInterceptor(timeoutInterceptor)
             // Set a 5s custom connect timout
             .connectTimeout(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
             .build()
    

As you might have noticed, you can set a custom connect timeout. Otherwise, it's left to 10 seconds as a default value according to the documentation.

  1. Create an enum class ConnectionState. It will provide an enum constant object CONNECTION_TIMEOUT which will be used further to convey the appropriate connection (or API call) state from EntityNetworkDataSource class to the View class (if you follow Google's MVVM pattern):

     enum class ConnectionState {
         CONNECTED, NOT_CONNECTED, CONNECTION_TIMEOUT
     }
    
  2. Assuming your EntityNetworkDataSource interface would look something like this:

     interface EntityNetworkDataSource {
         val fetchedEntity: LiveData<Entity>
    
         // Wrap your ConnectionState object in LiveData in order to be able to observe it in the View
         val connectionState: LiveData<ConnectionState>
    
         // Fetch `Entity` object from the network
         suspend fun fetchEntity(id: Int)
     }
    
  3. In the EntityNetworkDataSource implementation class, you can properly catch the SocketTimeoutException as shown below, inside the fetchEntity(id: Int) implementation:

     class EntityNetworkDataSourceImpl(
             private val apiService: ApiService
     ) : EntityNetworkDataSource {
    
         private val _fetchedEntity = MutableLiveData<Entity>()
    
         override val fetchedEntity: LiveData<Entity>
             get() = _fetchedEntity
    
         // We want to keep our MutableLiveData private because they can be changed.
         // So we want to be able to update them only from the inside of this class
         private val _connectionState = MutableLiveData<ConnectionState>()
    
         override val connectionState: LiveData<ConnectionState>
             get() = _connectionState
    
         override suspend fun fetchEntity(id: Int) {
             try {
                 val fetchedEntity = apiService
                         .getEntity(id)
                         .await()
    
                 // Convey the updated connection state to the observer View
                 _connectionState.postValue(ConnectionState.CONNECTED)
    
                 _fetchedEntity.postValue(fetchedEntity)
             } catch (e: SocketTimeoutException) {
                 Log.e(tag, "Connection timeout. ", e)
                 // Catch the SocketTimeoutException and post the updated connection state to the observer View
                 _connectionState.postValue(ConnectionState.CONNECTION_TIMEOUT)
             }
         }
     }
    

The same principle applies to any connection exception you wana intercept and catch.

1
  • 2
    Tons of code and the only important part is the try..catch in fetchEntity()... :( Oct 12, 2020 at 14:12
-1

Kotlin

If you want to use Retrofit in Kotlin follow below steps:

Define your Retrofit interface:

interface GitHubApi {

    @GET("/users/{userName}/repos")
    fun repos(@Path("userName") userName: String): Call<List<Repo>>
}

Implement your service:

class Api(...) {

    private val baseUrl = "https://api.github.com"
    private val api: GitHubApi

    private fun loggingInterceptor(...): HttpLoggingInterceptor {...}

    private fun okHttpBuilder(): OkHttpClient {...}

    init {...}

    fun repos(
        userName: String,
        onSuccess: (list: List<Repo>?) -> Unit,
        onFailure: (message: String?) -> Unit): Future<Unit> {
        return runAsync(api.repos(userName), onSuccess, onFailure)
    }

    private fun <T> runAsync(
        call: retrofit2.Call<T>,
        onSuccess: (T?) -> Unit,
        onFailure: (message: String?) -> Unit) : Future<Unit> {
        return doAsync {
            try {
                val response = call.execute()
                when {
                    response.isSuccessful -> response.body()?.let {
                        onSuccess(it)
                    }
                    else -> {
                        onFailure(response.raw().message())
                    }
                }
            } catch (e: IOException) {
                if (e is SocketTimeoutException) {
                    onFailure("Response time out!")
                } else {
                    onFailure(e.message)
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Call your service in where you want:

Api().repos("olcayertas",
    onSuccess = {
        Log.d("MainActivity", "Response:\n" + toJson(it))
    },
    onFailure = {
        Log.e("MainActivity", "Error: $it")
    })

You can handle any exception you want in runAsync function.

You can get fully working example here.

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