17

Consider the following HTML5+Javascript:

$(function() {	
    $('#edit').hide();
	
	$('#value')
		.css('cursor', 'pointer')
		.click(function() {
			$('#edit').show();
			$('#edit input').focus();
			$('#value').hide();
		});
	
	$('#edit input')
		.keyup(function(e) {
			if (e.keyCode == 13) {  // <enter>
				$('#value').show();
				$('#edit').hide();
			}
		});
  });
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="value">
	<a href="#">hello</a>
</div>
<div id="edit">
	<input type="text" value="hello" />
</div>

Originally, all this did was to capture click events on the text hello, replacing the text with an input box. When the user then hit Enter, the new text would be saved to server via AJAX and the input box again replaced with just the text.

Now I've added the a tag to allow navigation via Tab+Enter rather than only using the mouse (accessibility; yay!), but I'm finding that, when doing so, the call to focus() magically triggers the keyup() event. (I know this because commenting out the call to focus() otherwise results in the desired behaviour.)

The result is that tabbing and entering onto the text opens but then immediately closes the input box, and as far as the user's concerned, nothing has happened at all.

Why is the input's keyup handler being triggered by a click event on a completely unrelated element? How can I stop this from happening?


Working scenario

  1. Click on hello
  2. hello disappears; textbox appears, with caret inside it
  3. Press Enter
  4. Textbox disappears; hello reappears

Broken scenario

  1. Put focus on document
  2. Press Tab until hello is in focus
  3. Press Enter
  4. hello disappears; textbox appears, with caret inside it
  5. Textbox disappears; hello reappears ... before I have a chance to do anything.
9
  • 3
    In your broken scenario, hold down enter on step 3. It's not until you release it (ie keyup, which is happening on the focussed input) that 4 and 5 happen. That's the why it's happening, as for fixing it... Apr 28, 2015 at 15:19
  • @JamesThorpe: Yeah. :( Apr 28, 2015 at 15:22
  • does putting a tabindex on the anchor tag and the input solve anything? Apr 28, 2015 at 15:28
  • 1
    doesn't a contenteditable DIV a solution for you? jsfiddle.net/7qjcdqzx
    – A. Wolff
    Apr 28, 2015 at 15:55
  • 1
    @LightningRacisinObrit It was an interesting problem so kept an eye on it - just didn't have time to try anything much myself! Apr 28, 2015 at 16:24

6 Answers 6

6

So the problem is that when you press the enter key, the keyup event is fired when you release the key.

This creates a flow like the following: 1, click the link (press enter key) 2, link hides 3, focus is given to text input (enter key is still pressed at this point) 4, release of key (keyup event is fired)

If you change the event to keydown then pressing enter on the link will not conflict the input because that input doesn't have focus.

Additionally, using the same code in the keydown event that you had in the keyup event will still do the exact same thing (ie press enter and the input hides and the link shows).

EDIT

https://jsfiddle.net/geyut7uv/

The only solid solution that I could find, was to create a "blocker" variable that "disables" the keydown event. I've attached it to the link only when the keydown is clicked. This is checked on the keydown event by the input which will be immediately triggered if a user holds the key down.

It's only when the enter key keyup event is triggered that I allow the "blocker" variable pass.

Ideally, I'd like to remove all global scope variables, but I couldn't find a way to recognize that an event (keydown) was currently in use.

<div id="value">
    <a href="#">hello</a>
</div>
<div id="edit">
    <input type="text" value="hello" />
</div>

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
    var enter_enabled = true;
    $('#edit').hide();

    $('#value')
    .css('cursor', 'pointer')
    .click(function() {
        $('#edit').show();
        $('#edit input').focus();
        $('#value').hide();
    }).keydown(function(e){
        enter_enabled = false;
    });

    $('#edit input')
    .keydown(function(e){
        if(e.keyCode == 13 && enter_enabled){
            $('#value').show();
            $('#edit').hide();
        }
    })
    .keyup(function(e){
        if(e.keyCode == 13){
            enter_enabled = true;
        }
    });
});
</script>
12
  • If you hold down return for too long, you get repeated keypresses, so the keydown fires on the input, changing it back to the link. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:42
  • I think your explanation is spot on. However, I don't think the fix is right. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:43
  • I could only achieve the desired results by creating an external variable. I couldn't recognize that an event was already in motion, which is a shame because I feel like that method should exist within JavaScript. I've updated the code to reflect the desired effect. Apr 28, 2015 at 16:23
  • Your edit has reproduced the same as one of the other answers now - if you click the link, you now need to hit return twice (or have pressed another key) on the input. Note that this isn't a global variable - it's contained in the outer function, so in my opinion is fine - it's contained within the scope of this functionality. Apr 28, 2015 at 16:23
  • thats strange i only have to hit enter once to hide the input Apr 28, 2015 at 16:26
5

Here's an alternative solution. The only difference in functionality is that the input only appears and is focused when the enter key is released. It listens to keydown and prevents the default keyboard click, and then performs the swap in the keyup event instead so that the keyup doesn't make it to the input field. I've tried it in IE 11, Chrome, and Firefox, all on Windows.

$(function() {
    $('#edit').hide();

    $('#value')
        .css('cursor', 'pointer')
        .click(function() {
            $('#edit').show();
            $('#edit input').focus();
            $('#value').hide();
         });

    $('#value a')
        .keydown(function(e) { // Prevent default enter click
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                e.preventDefault();
                e.stopPropagation();
            }
        }).keyup(function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                e.preventDefault();
                e.stopPropagation();
                $('#edit').show();
                $('#edit input').focus();
                $('#value').hide();
            }
        });

    $('#edit input')
        .keyup(function(e) {
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {  // <enter>
                $('#value').show();
                $('#edit').hide();
            }
        });
});
1
  • I was asking on behalf of a colleague and I'm told that this is the one we'll be using, so the accept is yours. Thank you! Apr 29, 2015 at 9:37
2

I went down the route of using a flag updated fiddle-again:

The html remains the same, but the js changes, a bit. I added a 'valueClicked' variable and set it to false; Then, use that as the condition in the keyup, however, after the keyup condition check, i reset the flag.

     $(function() { 
var valueClickedFromEnter = false;
$('#edit').hide();
function handleLinkClick(event)
{
         $('#edit').show();
        $('#edit input').focus();
        $('#value').hide();
        valueClickedFromEnter = 
            (event.keyCode && event.keyCode == 13);   
}
$('#value')
    .css('cursor', 'pointer')
    .keydown(handleLinkClick).click(handleLinkClick);

$('#edit input')
    .keyup(function(e) {            
        if (e.keyCode == 13 && !valueClickedFromEnter) {  // <enter>
            $('#value').show();
            $('#edit').hide();
        }
        valueClickedFromEnter = false;
    });

});

The idea is that whenever you hit enter from tabbing to the anchor, the flag is set, the keyup checked and then the flag is reset so that on the next enter, the condition passes. Then, using it normally, the flag is never set so the condition still passes.

Edited: based on feedback, clientX and clientY are not cross-browser solutions. I have, instead, used an intermediary function to handle the keydown and click events for the anchor tag, passing the event object through. This object is then checked for a keycode property, if it is 13, then the flag is toggled.

The extra benefit is that using another key, like space bar, causes the link to toggle, as well, and if the user starts typing, it will go into the input.

8
  • 1
    This is exactly what I'd originally tried. However it breaks using the mouse - ie click the link instead now. You now need to hit return twice (or have pressed at least one other key) in the input Apr 28, 2015 at 15:39
  • This is what I was getting at in my comment on the OP as well though - if there's a way to detect if the click was fired by a keypress rather than the mouse, you can then use that to set the flag (or not), which will solve the problem. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:46
  • ok, I updated my answer. checking the client x and y from the click event will yield whether or not it was an enter click or a mouse click. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:46
  • 1
    in FF on a mac, I get -141 & -461 for respectively clientX & clientY, so you may want to chenge ===0 to <=0, but I'm not sure you can entirely count on that info...
    – Kaiido
    Apr 28, 2015 at 16:08
  • 2
    -141+-461 is still not 0 - ie looks like you really can't rely on clientX and clientY in all browsers. So back to the problem of differentiating click from keyboard... Apr 28, 2015 at 16:11
2

Rather than messing with flags and whatnot, I decided to disable the input element when not visible. Disabled elements can't receive focus, so theoretically you won't have an issue wherein the Enter key was still coming up while the element was active.

I also explicitly set the focus to the anchor when the Enter key is pressed within the input element. This ensures that the focus is no longer on that element before disabling it, which could cause issues.

Note that I've only tested this in Chrome 42 (oh, and FF 36 and IE 11) on Windows 8.1, so YMMV.

$(function() {
  $('#edit').hide();

  var keyupHandler = function(e) {
    if (e.keyCode === 13) { // <enter>
      $('#value').show().focus();
      $('#edit').hide().find('input').prop('disabled', true);
    }
  };

  var clickHandler = function(e) {
    $('#value').hide();
    $('#edit').show(500, function() {
      $(this).find('input').prop('disabled', false).focus();
    });
    e.preventDefault();
  };

  $('#value').on('click', clickHandler);
  $('#edit').on('keydown', 'input', keyupHandler);

});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="value">
  <a href="#">hello</a>
</div>
<div id="edit">
  <input type="text" value="hello" />
</div>

5
  • 1
    This doesn't work. Hold the "enter" key down for more than a fraction of a second and the original problem is reproduced! Apr 28, 2015 at 23:39
  • It just seems kind of implicit :P Apr 29, 2015 at 13:19
  • I guess I don't hold down the Enter key as a matter of course. I tap my keysssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss... For the most part :P Apr 29, 2015 at 13:20
  • I'm always trying to think not of what I do, but of what my users will do. :) Apr 29, 2015 at 13:21
  • So, how long can they hold the Enter key down? I mean, half a second (as I've added above) seems like an extraordinarily long time to hold down a key. Apr 29, 2015 at 13:35
0

Updated to fix the long-press issue. Problem is simple, you had an event listening for keyup, you specifically gave focus to that element, so it was triggering when user released the key.

Update #2: This one should work fully, Ironically, I had to reverse my initial change to execute everything upon element hiding.

Try this:

var enterPressed = false;
var enteredExclusion = false;
$(document).ready(function() {
$('#edit').hide();

$('#value')
    .css('cursor', 'pointer')
    .click(function() {
        $('#value').hide();
        $('#edit').show();
            $('#editabletext').focusin(function(e){
                enteredExclusion = true;
            }).focusout(function(e){
                enterPressed = false;
                enteredExclusion = false;
            }).focus();
    });

$('#editabletext')
    .keydown(function(e){
        if (e.keyCode == 13 && !enteredExclusion) {  // <enter>
            console.log('setting true');
            enterPressed = true;
        }
     })
    .keyup(function(e) {
        enteredExclusion = false;
        if (e.keyCode == 13 && (enterPressed  )) {
            $('#value').show();
            $('#edit').hide();
            console.log('setting false - keyup');
            enterPressed = false;
        }
    });
 });

html:

<div id="value">
    <a href="#">hello</a>
</div>
<div id="edit">
    <input id="editabletext" type="text" value="hello" />
</div>
4
  • Hey y'know this isn't bad - results encouraging so far. Could you explain a little how deferring the focus() call fixes it? Apr 28, 2015 at 15:38
  • This still suffers the "hold the return key for too long" problem - the keyup still fires on the input Apr 28, 2015 at 15:41
  • 1
    Yeah this is a "works if you get lucky with timing" solution I suppose. At the moment I do think the right approach is swapping keyUp for something else so it doesn't "steal" half a keypress from the original element. :) Apr 28, 2015 at 15:42
  • This no longer seems to focus the input after the last update? Apr 28, 2015 at 15:55
-1

What is happening seems to be the following:

1) User presses enter on the focused element -> this will trigger the click event as well as the keyup event. The click event is triggered first.

2) Handler of click on #value will be called. This handler shows the #edit field and sets the focus on this field.

3) The keyup event is triggered. But since the focus now lies on #edit, it will be triggered for this field (!)

4) Handler of keyup on #edit will be called and hides the #edit field again.

3
  • 1
    i think this only answers half the question, the "Why", OP also wants the "How to fix" part. Apr 28, 2015 at 15:55
  • @JasonWilczak I think that people don't know what the up- and down-voting buttons are for. You vote up if the answer is useful and down if it is not useful. Are you saying that half an answer is not useful? It's better than nothing isn't it? I mean, I get it, it doesn't answer everything. And it's also not that I can't live with a down vote. But still...why? What is the point of down-voting an answer that is correct and addresses the original question (or at least half of it)?
    – basilikum
    Apr 28, 2015 at 20:58
  • I mean, i'm not sure. I didn't downvote your answer since it was on topic, but I didn't upvote it either since it didn't answer the full question. I agree, if it is on topic and answers part of the question at hand, then a downvote isn't in order, but, obviously, some people feel differently ::shrug:: Apr 28, 2015 at 23:31

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