8

I have threaded task wich performs some operation in loop:

static void TaskAction(CancellationToken ct)
{
    while (SomeCondition())
    {
        DoSomeSeriousJob();
        ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
    }
}

static void DoSomeSeriousJob()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Serious job started");
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
    Console.WriteLine("Serious job done");
}

I start it and then cancel after some period of time:

    var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => TaskAction(cts.Token), cts.Token);
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    cts.Cancel();

This operation must be finished correctly, I don't want to interrupt it. But I want to send a cancellation request to my task and wait until it finishes correctly (by which I mean it gets to some point in code). I tryed following approaches:

1. Wait(CancellationToken ct)

try
{
    task.Wait(cts.Token);
}
catch (OperationCanceledException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Task cancelled");
}
// Must be joined here.

In this case program returns immediately from Wait(). The task continues to run until ThrowIfCancellationRequested() but if main thread exits the task gets interrupted too.

2. Wait()

try
{
    task.Wait();
}
catch (OperationCanceledException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Task cancelled");
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
}

Here main thread waits for completion but at the end AggregateException is risen with InnerException = TaskCancelledException (not OperationCancelledException).

3. Check IsCancellationRequested() and no exceptions

static void TaskAction(CancellationToken ct)
{
    while (SomeCondition())
    {
        DoSomeSeriousJob();
        if (ct.IsCancellationRequested)
            break;
    }
}
// ...
task.Wait();

In this case no exceptions are risen but the task gets status RanToCompletion in the end. This is not distiguishable from correct completion when SomeCodition() starts to return false.

All these problem have easy workarounds but I wonder, may be I'm missing something? Could anybody advise me better solution?

5
  • 2
    If you pass a cancellation token to Wait then it will cancel the waiting. Don't pass the token to Wait if you want to wait for the task to finish.
    – juharr
    Apr 28, 2015 at 16:04
  • 2
    Re 2, TaskCanceledException is derived from OperationCanceledException. If you used await instead of Wait, then the AggregateException would be unwrapped and you could catch the InnerException. Apr 28, 2015 at 16:08
  • juharr, this is my case 1. What is the use of calling Wait(ct) if it won't wait?
    – greatvovan
    Apr 28, 2015 at 16:19
  • Got it. It waits for completion or raises OperationCancelledException if token is cancelled and Wait() without parameters waits for completion and raises AggregateException if token is cancelled.
    – greatvovan
    Apr 28, 2015 at 16:29
  • In case 3, if you leave operation after observing that cancellation has been requested, would you still consider the method as finished? To distinguish graceful and cancelled execution, you could use CancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested. Apr 28, 2015 at 16:37

2 Answers 2

5

If you want to wait for the task to complete (or gets cancelled) synchronously, you can try this:

cts.Cancel();
Task.Run(async () => {
    try {
        await task;
    }
    catch (OperationCanceledException ex) {
      // ...
    }
).Wait();

So that you can directly catch OperationCanceledException instead of catching an AggregateException.

Edit:

Wait(CanecllationToken)

This approach won't work for that purpose. MSDN statement:

Waits for the Task to complete execution. The wait terminates if a cancellation token is canceled before the task completes.

Wait()

You can use this approach but as you can see, you should expect an AggregateException not OperationCanceledException. It is also specified in documents of the method.

The AggregateException.InnerExceptions collection contains a TaskCanceledException object.

So in this approach, in order to make sure operation is cancelled, you can check if inner expection contains a TaskCanceledException or not.

Check IsCancellationRequested() and no exceptions

In this way, this is obvious that no exception is thrown and you can't find out if the operation is cancelled or not.

If you don't want to wait synchronously, everything works as expected:

cts.Cancel();
try {
    await task;
}
catch (OperationCanceledException ex) {
   // ...
}
2
  • Not as beautiful as I wanted but interesting :)
    – greatvovan
    Apr 28, 2015 at 16:54
  • Yes, the beautiful way is waiting asynchronously. Apr 28, 2015 at 17:06
0

Try this:

try
{
    task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
}
catch (OperationCanceledException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Task cancelled");
}

You'll get an OperationCanceledException and it won't be wrapped with AggregateException.

3
  • It may work but for unknown reason, msdn states that "This method is intended for compiler use rather than for use in application code." Apr 30, 2015 at 11:09
  • 1
    @MehrzadChehraz, MSDN docs have their share of imperfections and innuendos. This method is widely used and isn't going anywhere as it's a part of the awaiter infrastructure.
    – noseratio
    Apr 30, 2015 at 11:20
  • @MehrzadChehraz, as to your approach, Task.Run is clearly redundant there. You might as well just do (new Func<Task>(async () => { ... }))().Wait();
    – noseratio
    Apr 30, 2015 at 13:31

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