11

I just want to check that an object is a Map or Set and not an Array.

to check an Array I'm using lodash's _.isArray.

function myFunc(arg) {
  if (_.isArray(arg)) {
    // doSomethingWithArray(arg)
  }

  if (isMap(arg)) {
    // doSomethingWithMap(arg)
  }

  if (isSet(arg)) {
    // doSomethingWithSet(arg)
  }
}

If I were to implement isMap/isSet, what does it need to look like? I'd like for it to be able to catch subclasses of Map/Set if possible as well.

19
0

The situation is similar to pre-ES5 methods to detect arrays properly and reliably. See this great article for the possible pitfalls of implementing isArray.

We can use

  • obj.constructor == Map/Set, but that doesn't work on subclass instances (and can easily be deceived)
  • obj instanceof Map/Set, but that still doesn't work across realms (and can be deceived by prototype mangling)
  • obj[Symbol.toStringTag] == "Map"/"Set", but that can trivially be deceived again.

To be really sure, we'd need to test whether an object has a [[MapData]]/[[SetData]] internal slot. Which is not so easily accessible - it's internal. We can use a hack, though:

function isMap(o) {
    try {
        Map.prototype.has.call(o); // throws if o is not an object or has no [[MapData]]
        return true;
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }
}
function isSet(o) {
    try {
        Set.prototype.has.call(o); // throws if o is not an object or has no [[SetData]]
        return true;
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }
}

For common use, I'd recommend instanceof - it's simple, understandable, performant, and works for most reasonable cases. Or you go for duck typing right away and only check whether the object has has/get/set/delete/add/delete methods.

| improve this answer | |
  • Why not use Object.prototype.toString.call(o) == '[object Set]'? Is there some case when that would fail, other than someone overriding Object.prototype.toString? (I don't think an overridden Object.prototype.toString is worth worrying about - it's a bad practice that would break lots of existing libraries.) – Matt Browne Mar 4 '17 at 13:49
  • @MattBrowne Object.prototype.toString is equivalent to using the Symbol.toStringTag method - you don't need to overwrite the global, it can be messed with on a per-object basis. – Bergi Mar 4 '17 at 20:16
5
0

You can use the instanceof operator:

function isSet(candidate) {
  return candidate instanceof Set;
}

If the candidate object has Set.prototype in its prototype chain, then the instanceof operator returns true.

edit — while the instanceof thing will work most of the time, there are situations in which it won't, as described in Bergi's answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • Will that work even if the set is a subclass of Set? I should've specified, that as a concern. – nackjicholson Apr 28 '15 at 16:31
  • 1
    @nackjicholson well that depends on how you're creating the subclass. The instanceof operator returns true if the .prototype of the constructor is in the object's prototype chain. – Pointy Apr 28 '15 at 16:33
  • 1
    @nackjicholson: As long as you do class MySet extends Set, yes. – Felix Kling Apr 28 '15 at 16:37
  • 1
    Note that if you're writing code for a library that will be redistributed, it would be good to check first if window.Set is defined (unless your library includes a shim for older browsers). (Or to make it work on the server too, you could check typeof Set != 'undefined'). – Matt Browne Mar 4 '17 at 13:44
  • 1
    Yes. Actually it's worse in this case because unlike arrays, Sets are only in the most recent spec. It's common to use a shim for older browsers, and I just realized that the Object.prototype.toString check wouldn't work for those. I may post an answer here with what I ultimately land on. – Matt Browne Mar 4 '17 at 14:15
1
0

You can simply use:

export function isMap(item) {
  return !!item && Object.prototype.toString.call(item) === '[object Map]';
}

export function isSet(item) {
  return !!item && Object.prototype.toString.call(item) === '[object Set]';
}

Unless the prototype of this method was overridden

| improve this answer | |
  • Is the boolean check strictly needed? Seems to work with falsy values without. – Brett Zamir Apr 11 at 4:34
  • Yes it's needed because object.toString is called on item if it's undefined or null it will throw error – Melchia Apr 11 at 15:22
  • In Chrome and Firefox, for Object.prototype.toString.call(null) I get "[object Null]" and "[objectUndefined]" for a call on undefined. – Brett Zamir Apr 12 at 0:27

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