3

I have a batch file that will run several other file (lets call it procedure file) such as .bat,.exe,.py, etc...

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextPython_4-27-2015.txt (
    Start /wait /b C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\CreateTextFile.py || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextPython_4-27-2015.txt
)

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt (
    Start /wait /b C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\CreateNewFile.bat || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt
)

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextConsole_4-27-2015.txt (
    Start /wait /b C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\TestConsole.exe apple || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextConsole_4-27-2015.txt
)

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_HelloWorld_4-27-2015.txt (
    Start /wait /b C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\HelloWorld.bat || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_HelloWorld_4-27-2015.txt
)

So basically, the batch file will check if the following file need to be run based on the existence of dummy file associate with each of the procedure file. This will prevent us from running successfully run if we are to run the batch file the second time.

If there is no error in any of the procedure file then the code will work fine.

The exit error will only work if the file/filepath is incorrect. The problem I am facing is that, since the Start /wait /b will always execute regardless of if one of my procedure file have an error. Therefore the exit %errorlevel% would not be run.

How do I allow the batch file to detect an error if a procedure file is broken? I would like to exit/terminal the batch file if one of the procedure file is not working. Any thoughts?

PS. /wait is needed because the start should be running in a sequential order.
/b is needed or else the program will stop after running a .bat ; /b allow us to run the batch file in the same cmd window.

Appreciate any help and thank you

Edited: The code would work if i do the following. But I am hoping to have a consistency format in my batch file, since the batch file is being generated by C# with parsing of .xml files.

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextPython_4-27-2015.txt (
    C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\CreateTextFile.py || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextPython_4-27-2015.txt
)

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt (
    Start /wait /b C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\CreateNewFile.bat || exit %errorlevel%
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt
)
5
  • Why do you not use command call instead of start /wait /b which is the built-in command of cmd.exe for calling an application in same command line process and waiting for exit of called application or batch job?
    – Mofi
    Apr 28 '15 at 17:42
  • @Mofi but would call only works on .bat files. The reason I need to have consistence in using start/call is because the batch file is being generated by a C# code that pull the procedure name and path from tons of xml files. Apr 28 '15 at 17:47
  • call can be used also for executables although for console applications it is not necessary at all to call the console executable with command call as command line interpreter automatically halts processing until console application terminated, see findstr, net, wmic, ... which are all *.exe in Windows system directory simply used in batch files. Command start is mainly for starting GUI applications with or without halting command line process or to start a separate command line process running parallel.
    – Mofi
    Apr 28 '15 at 17:52
  • For the Python script you have to call in the batch file the Python interpreter executable with the Python script file name with path as parameter. start looks in Windows registry which application is registered for opening a file with an extension not listed in environment variable PATHEXT.
    – Mofi
    Apr 28 '15 at 17:55
  • +1 Well said and excellent help. That just solve all of my problem. I just started programming few months back and I still have a long way to go =D Thanks a lot Mofi. Apr 28 '15 at 18:00
5

I have found some issues in start /WAIT /B any_program || exit %errorlevel%:

  • #1 - %errorlevel% variable will be expanded at parse time. Thus your script never returns proper exit code. See EnableDelayedExpansion.
  • #2 - || conditional command execution: unfortunately I can't document it properly, but all my attempts with it failed in relation to start command...

IMHO next code snippet (the only example) could work as expected:

if Not Exist JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt (
    start /B /WAIT C:\Users\blee2\Documents\UnitTest\CreateNewFile.bat
    SETLOCAL enabledelayedexpansion
    if !errorlevel! NEQ 0 exit !errorlevel!
    ENDLOCAL
    copy /y nul JobStreamUnitTest_CreateTextBatch_4-27-2015.txt
)
  • #3 - a bug in the implementation of the start command.

start /WAIT /B doesn't work (the /wait argument is ignored):

==>start /WAIT /B wmic OS GET Caption & echo xxx
xxx

==>Caption
Microsoft Windows 8.1

There's a simple workaround (from SupeUser) as start /B /WAIT works:

==>start /B /WAIT wmic OS GET Caption & echo xxx
Caption
Microsoft Windows 8.1

xxx
2
  • If the start command succeeds in starting the program it's considered a success regardless of the process exit code, which I confirmed with a breakpoint on cmd!eOr (the || operation) and cmd!Start. But waiting on the process does update errorlevel, so this can be worked around.
    – Eryk Sun
    Apr 30 '15 at 3:28
  • 1
    The problem with using /w /b is not so much a bug as it is a consequence of the simplistic parsing in cmd!Start. The /b option tells cmd to not wait for the process since it runs in the background. This overrides the previous /w option. Order matters in this case.
    – Eryk Sun
    Apr 30 '15 at 3:28

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