1

I understand that instance variables are mean to be states, and constants are meant to be constant. Is there any reason (besides convention) to use a constant instead of an instance variable? Is there a memory/speed advantage to using constants?

3
  • 1
    Of course constants are meant to be constants. It is a tautology. It does not make sense to write that.
    – sawa
    Apr 28 '15 at 18:51
  • Given that you can change a constant in Ruby, it is not a tautology.
    – torie
    Apr 28 '15 at 18:56
  • I see. You are using constant in two different ways.
    – sawa
    Apr 28 '15 at 19:27
5

There's a few things to consider here:

  • Will the value change within the life-cycle of an object?
  • Will you need to override the value in sub-classes?
  • Do you need to configure the value at run-time?

The best kind of constants are those that don't really change short of updating the software:

class ExampleClass
  STATES = %i[
    off
    on
    broken
  ].freeze
end

Generally you use these constants internally in the class and avoid sharing them. When you share them you're limited in how they're used. For example, if another class referenced ExampleClass::STATES then you can't change that structure without changing other code.

You can make this more abstract by providing an interface:

class ExampleClass
  def self.states
    STATES
  end
end

If you change the structure of that constant in the future you can always preserve the old behaviour:

class ExampleClass
  STATES = {
    on: 'On',
    off: 'Off',
    broken: 'Broken'
  }.freeze

  def self.states
    STATES.keys
  end
end

When you're talking about instance variables you mean things you can configure:

class ConfigurableClass
  INITIAL_STATE_DEFAULT = :off

  def self.initial_state
    @initial_state || INITIAL_STATE_DEFAULT
  end

  def self.initial_state=(value)
    @initial_state = value ? value.to_sym
  end
end

Constants are great in that they're defined once and used for the duration of the process, so technically they're faster. Instance variables are still pretty quick, and are often a necessity as illustrated above.

5
  • You can also use Module#const_set: A.const_set('K','cat'); A.const_get('K') #=> "cat". Apr 28 '15 at 21:25
  • True, but you'll get all sorts of nasty warnings if you're trying to re-define a constant, so there's extra work to undefine, then redefine it, vs. just assigning a variable.
    – tadman
    Apr 28 '15 at 21:31
  • I'm not so sure if constants are actually faster in Ruby, as they are technically still variables - you can read and write them at runtime. In compiled languages the compiler could inline constants to speed things up, but in Ruby this would be harder.
    – averell
    Apr 30 '15 at 14:27
  • @averell There's a small penalty incurred for a method call of any kind, but this penalty is shrinking with each version of Ruby released. For example, attr_reader generated methods are faster than an equivalent one coded by hand due to internal optimizations. In most circumstances this penalty is irrelevant, but it's worth knowing about.
    – tadman
    Apr 30 '15 at 19:07
  • @tadman - I thought we were talking about accessing instance variables vs. accessing constants, so no method calls involved in either case. I agree that there may be some optimization potential for constants, though.
    – averell
    May 6 '15 at 11:12
0

Constants, unlike instance variables, are global. And they will at least complain if you try to re-assign their value.

While there might be a theoretical difference in memory/speed, it will be irrelevant in practice.

2
  • Constants are global only if declared in the global context, otherwise they're scoped as usual.
    – tadman
    Apr 28 '15 at 19:58
  • 1
    Scope constants are still global variables, in the sense that they exist exactly once the runtime (and are accessible from everywhere). Instance variables, on the other hand, exist per object and are only accessible through the object they belong to.
    – averell
    Apr 30 '15 at 14:19
0

You may not realize this, but classes and modules are considered constants.

pry(main)> Foo
NameError: uninitialized constant Foo

The best advice I can give as to when you should use constants are when they are exactly that, constant. For example, if I was making a scope in rails to find all the of recent Foos for instance, I would create a constant that shows what recent is.

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  DAYS_TILL_OLD = 7.days

  scope :recent, -> { where "created_at > ?", DateTime.now - DAYS_TILL_OLD  }
end
11
  • Not necessarily. Modules (including classes) are not necessarily constants. Class.new, a = Class.new, @a = Class.new, @@a = Class.new, $a = Class.new.
    – sawa
    Apr 28 '15 at 18:53
  • 1
    Instances of classes are assigned to constants, but a class is not a constant itself. Apr 28 '15 at 20:03
  • @sawa Class is still a constant. sure it can be assigned to a variable, but the class Class is still a constant. ruby-doc.org/core-2.2.1/Module.html#method-c-constants. "In the first form, returns an array of the names of all constants accessible from the point of call. This list includes the names of all modules and classes defined in the global scope." Just try Object.constants to see for yourself.
    – Sean
    Apr 28 '15 at 21:39
  • 1
    Classes are just instances of the Class class. You can have classes which are not assigned to constants. foo = Class.new is perfectly valid; you can then instantiate it with foo.new, without there ever being a constant in play. Apr 28 '15 at 21:46
  • 1
    The Class class is assigned to the Class constant, yes. That doesn't mean that all classes are constants. Apr 28 '15 at 21:50

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