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I'm currently looking for the fastest data structure in C++ that fulfils my requirements:

  1. I start with a few million entries which need to be inserted.
  2. In each iteration I want to peek at the maximum element and update around 10 other elements. I even could do with only decreasing keys, but I would prefer an update (increase and decrease functionality).

I don't need deletes/insertions (apart from the initial one) nor anything else. I thought a heap would be the preferable choice. After looking into the STL I found that most data structures do not support an update (which is the crucial part). The solution would be to delete and reinsert the elements which seems to be quite slow (bottleneck of my program). I then looked at the heaps provided by boost and found that the pairing_heap gives me the best results. All heaps are, however, still slower than the delete/insert process on a MultiMap. Does anybody have a suggestion, which other approach/implementation I could try?

Thank you very much.

Again for completeness sake, here are my current timings:

  1. MultiMap STL (delete/insert): ~70 sec
  2. Fibonacci Boost: ~110 sec
  3. D-Ary Heap Boost ~(best choice: D=150): ~120 sec
  4. Pairing Heap Boost: ~90 sec
  5. Skew Heap Boost: 105 sec

Edited my post to clarify a few things:

  1. My entries are doubles (double is the key, I still have some arbitrary value attached to it) that is why I don't think that hashing is a good idea.
  2. I was talking about a PriorityQueue which was incorrect. Instead the first implementation used a MultiMap where the values would be erased and then reinserted (with the new value). I updated my post. Sorry for the confusion.
  3. I don't see how std::make_heap can solve this problem.
  4. To update the elements I have a separate lookup table in which I maintain a handle to the element. With that I can directly update the element without searching for it.
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  • Any chance that a hash of some sort would work for you? With enough memory, that would make the searches/updates many times much quicker. You could cache the size pretty easily as well. Commented Apr 28, 2015 at 23:20
  • 1
    Can you explain how exactly you are updating elements in a std::priority_queue? Heaps don't have searching functionality, and std::priority_queue doesn't even have iterators.
    – Brian Bi
    Commented Apr 28, 2015 at 23:26
  • Have you looked at std::make_heap, std::push_heap and std::pop_heap?
    – Galik
    Commented Apr 28, 2015 at 23:28
  • I updated my questions to answer a few question. To recap: I use doubles, so no real point in hashing (I think). I wasn't using a std::priority_queue but a MultiMap. I looked into make_heap but I can't see how that solves the updating problem. Any ideas?
    – user667804
    Commented Apr 28, 2015 at 23:42
  • 1
    A key part of your problem with using heaps is locating the object. You either need some kind of index into the heap (which means a map of some sort needs to be kept synced with the heap) or you have to do a search of the array. You can prune the search using the value of the searched for object, but the search is still O(n) worst case, (and I suspect expected case too). Once you've located the object the update is quick O(log(n)) using either "bubble up" or "bubble down" depending on the new value. But its this initial search that means you'll have a hard time out-performing traditional maps. Commented Apr 29, 2015 at 0:07

1 Answer 1

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Reducing Generality

I tried my hand at this since it was interesting and I think I could use such a structure myself. It's usually extremely difficult to beat professionally-written standard libraries unless you can make narrowing assumptions which restrict the generality (and possibly robustness) of your solution much more than theirs.

For example, it is extremely hard to beat malloc and free if your goal is just to write a memory allocator as general-purpose and as well-rounded as malloc. However, if you make a lot of assumptions for a specific use case, it's easy to write an allocator that beats these just for that specific case.

It's why, if you have questions like this about data structures, I suggest providing as much information about the peculiar details of your specific use case as possible (what you need out of the structure like iteration, sorting, searching, removal from the middle, insertion to the front, the range of your keys, the types, etc). Some test code (even pseudocode) of what you want to do is helpful. We want as many of those narrowing assumptions as possible.

Sub-Par Search Algorithms for Highly Dynamic Content

In your case, we have a peculiarly dynamic use of such a large heap-type structure. I come originally from an old school gaming background and in those kinds of very dynamic cases, often a sub-par search algorithm actually works better than one that has a superior algorithmic complexity since that search superiority often comes with a price tag of a more expensive build/update process (slower insertions/removals).

For example, if you have loads of sprites moving around every frame in a 2D game, evenly a crudely-written, algorithmically-inferior fixed-grid accelerator for nearest-neighbor searches can often work better in practice than the algorithmically-superior, professionally-written quad-tree, as the cost of constantly moving things around and rebalancing the tree can add up to an overhead that outweighs the superior acceleration and the theoretical logarithmic complexity of everything. The fixed grid has pathological cases when all the sprites bunch up in one area, but that rarely happens.

So I took that kind of strategy. I'm making some assumptions, the biggest of which is that your keys are reasonably distributed across a range. The other is that you can roughly approximate the maximum number of elements the container should handle (though you can go over or under this number, but it works best with some crude knowledge and anticipation). And I didn't bother to provide iterators to iterate through the container (it's possible if you want, but the keys won't be perfectly sorted as with std::multimap, they'll be 'kinda' sorted), but it does offer removals from the middle in addition to popping the element with the minimum key. A pathological case exists in my solution which doesn't exist in, say, std::multimap, where if you have loads of elements where the keys are roughly the same value (ex: 0.000001, 0.00000012, 0.000000011, etc) for all million elements, it degrades into a linear search through all elements and performs considerably worse than multimap.

But I got a solution which is about ~8 times faster than std::multmap if my assumptions fit your use case.

Note: it is hasty code and written with a lot of quick and dirty profiler-assisted micro-optimizations, even providing a pool allocator and manipulating things at the bits and bytes level with alignment assumptions (using max alignment assuming that's "portable enough"). It also doesn't bother with things like exception safety. It should be safe to use for C++ objects, however.

As a test case, I created a million random keys and started popping the minimum keys, changing them, and reinserting them. I did this for both multimaps and my structure to compare the performance.

Balanced-Distribution Heap/Priority Queue (Kinda)

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <utility>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cmath>
#include <ctime>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <malloc.h>

// Max Alignment
#if defined(_MSC_VER)
    #define MAX_ALIGN __declspec(align(16))
#else
    #define MAX_ALIGN __attribute__((aligned(16)))
#endif

using namespace std;

static void* max_malloc(size_t amount)
{
    #ifdef _MSC_VER
        return _aligned_malloc(amount, 16);
    #else
        void* mem = 0;
        posix_memalign(&mem, 16, amount);
        return mem;
    #endif
}

static void max_free(void* mem)
{
    #ifdef _MSC_VER
        return _aligned_free(mem);
    #else
        free(mem);
    #endif
}

// Balanced priority queue for very quick insertions and 
// removals when the keys are balanced across a distributed range.
template <class Key, class Value, class KeyToIndex>
class BalancedQueue
{
public:
    enum {zone_len = 256};

    /// Creates a queue with 'n' buckets.
    explicit BalancedQueue(int n): 
        num_nodes(0), num_buckets(n+1), min_bucket(n+1), buckets(static_cast<Bucket*>(max_malloc((n+1) * sizeof(Bucket)))), free_nodes(0), pools(0)
    {
        const int num_zones = num_buckets / zone_len + 1;
        zone_counts = new int[num_zones];
        for (int j=0; j < num_zones; ++j)
            zone_counts[j] = 0;

        for (int j=0; j < num_buckets; ++j)
        {
            buckets[j].num = 0;
            buckets[j].head = 0;
        }
    }

    /// Destroys the queue.
    ~BalancedQueue()
    {
        clear();
        max_free(buckets);
        while (pools)
        {
            Pool* to_free = pools;
            pools = pools->next;
            max_free(to_free);
        }
        delete[] zone_counts;
    }

    /// Makes the queue empty.
    void clear()
    {
        const int num_zones = num_buckets / zone_len + 1;
        for (int j=0; j < num_zones; ++j)
            zone_counts[j] = 0;
        for (int j=0; j < num_buckets; ++j)
        {
            while (buckets[j].head)
            {
                Node* to_free = buckets[j].head;
                buckets[j].head = buckets[j].head->next;
                node_free(to_free);
            }
            buckets[j].num = 0;
        }
        num_nodes = 0;
        min_bucket = num_buckets+1;
    }

    /// Pushes an element to the queue.
    void push(const Key& key, const Value& value)
    {
        const int index = KeyToIndex()(key);
        assert(index >= 0 && index < num_buckets && "Key is out of range!");

        Node* new_node = node_alloc();
        new (&new_node->key) Key(key);
        new (&new_node->value) Value(value);
        new_node->next = buckets[index].head;
        buckets[index].head = new_node;
        assert(new_node->key == key && new_node->value == value);
        ++num_nodes;
        ++buckets[index].num;
        ++zone_counts[index/zone_len];
        min_bucket = std::min(min_bucket, index);
    }

    /// @return size() == 0.
    bool empty() const
    {
        return num_nodes == 0;
    }

    /// @return The number of elements in the queue.
    int size() const
    {
        return num_nodes;
    }

    /// Pops the element with the minimum key from the queue.
    std::pair<Key, Value> pop()
    {
        assert(!empty() && "Queue is empty!");
        for (int j=min_bucket; j < num_buckets; ++j)
        {
            if (buckets[j].head)
            {
                Node* node = buckets[j].head;
                Node* prev_node = node;
                Node* min_node = node;
                Node* prev_min_node = 0;
                const Key* min_key = &min_node->key;
                const Value* min_val = &min_node->value;
                for (node = node->next; node; prev_node = node, node = node->next)
                {
                    if (node->key < *min_key)
                    {
                        prev_min_node = prev_node;
                        min_node = node;
                        min_key = &min_node->key;
                        min_val = &min_node->value;
                    }
                }
                std::pair<Key, Value> kv(*min_key, *min_val);
                if (min_node == buckets[j].head)
                    buckets[j].head = buckets[j].head->next;
                else
                {
                    assert(prev_min_node);
                    prev_min_node->next = min_node->next;
                }
                removed_node(j);
                node_free(min_node);
                return kv;
            }
        }
        throw std::runtime_error("Trying to pop from an empty queue.");
    }

    /// Erases an element from the middle of the queue.
    /// @return True if the element was found and removed.
    bool erase(const Key& key, const Value& value)
    {
        assert(!empty() && "Queue is empty!");
        const int index = KeyToIndex()(key);
        if (buckets[index].head)
        {
            Node* node = buckets[index].head;
            if (node_key(node) == key && node_val(node) == value)
            {
                buckets[index].head = buckets[index].head->next;
                removed_node(index);
                node_free(node);
                return true;
            }

            Node* prev_node = node;
            for (node = node->next; node; prev_node = node, node = node->next)
            {
                if (node_key(node) == key && node_val(node) == value)
                {
                    prev_node->next = node->next;
                    removed_node(index);
                    node_free(node);
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

private:
    // Didn't bother to make it copyable -- left as an exercise.
    BalancedQueue(const BalancedQueue&);
    BalancedQueue& operator=(const BalancedQueue&);

    struct Node
    {
        Key key;
        Value value;
        Node* next;
    };
    struct Bucket
    {
        int num;
        Node* head;
    };
    struct Pool
    {
        Pool* next;
        MAX_ALIGN char buf[1];
    };
    Node* node_alloc()
    {
        if (free_nodes)
        {
            Node* node = free_nodes;
            free_nodes = free_nodes->next;
            return node;
        }

        const int pool_size = std::max(4096, static_cast<int>(sizeof(Node)));
        Pool* new_pool = static_cast<Pool*>(max_malloc(sizeof(Pool) + pool_size - 1));
        new_pool->next = pools;
        pools = new_pool;

        // Push the new pool's nodes to the free stack.
        for (int j=0; j < pool_size; j += sizeof(Node))
        {
            Node* node = reinterpret_cast<Node*>(new_pool->buf + j);
            node->next = free_nodes;
            free_nodes = node;
        }
        return node_alloc();
    }
    void node_free(Node* node)
    {
        // Destroy the key and value and push the node back to the free stack.
        node->key.~Key();
        node->value.~Value();
        node->next = free_nodes;
        free_nodes = node;
    }
    void removed_node(int bucket_index)
    {
        --num_nodes;
        --zone_counts[bucket_index/zone_len];
        if (--buckets[bucket_index].num == 0 && bucket_index == min_bucket)
        {
            // If the bucket became empty, search for next occupied minimum zone.
            const int num_zones = num_buckets / zone_len + 1;
            for (int j=bucket_index/zone_len; j < num_zones; ++j)
            {
                if (zone_counts[j] > 0)
                {
                    for (min_bucket=j*zone_len; min_bucket < num_buckets && buckets[min_bucket].num == 0; ++min_bucket) {}
                    assert(min_bucket/zone_len == j);
                    return;
                }
            }
            min_bucket = num_buckets+1;
            assert(empty());
        }
    }
    int* zone_counts;
    int num_nodes;
    int num_buckets;
    int min_bucket;
    Bucket* buckets;
    Node* free_nodes;
    Pool* pools;
};

/// Test Parameters
enum {num_keys = 1000000};
enum {buckets = 100000};

static double sys_time()
{
    return static_cast<double>(clock()) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
}

struct KeyToIndex
{
    int operator()(double val) const
    {
        return static_cast<int>(val * buckets);
    }
};

int main()
{
    vector<double> keys(num_keys);
    for (int j=0; j < num_keys; ++j)
        keys[j] = static_cast<double>(rand()) / RAND_MAX;

    for (int k=0; k < 5; ++k)
    {
        // Multimap
        {
            const double start_time = sys_time();
            multimap<double, int> q;
            for (int j=0; j < num_keys; ++j)
                q.insert(make_pair(keys[j], j));

            // Pop each key, modify it, and reinsert.
            for (int j=0; j < num_keys; ++j)
            {
                pair<double, int> top = *q.begin();
                q.erase(q.begin());
                top.first = static_cast<double>(rand()) / RAND_MAX;
                q.insert(top);
            }
            cout << (sys_time() - start_time) << " secs for multimap" << endl;
        }

        // Balanced Queue
        {
            const double start_time = sys_time();
            BalancedQueue<double, int, KeyToIndex> q(buckets);
            for (int j=0; j < num_keys; ++j)
                q.push(keys[j], j);

            // Pop each key, modify it, and reinsert.
            for (int j=0; j < num_keys; ++j)
            {
                pair<double, int> top = q.pop();
                top.first = static_cast<double>(rand()) / RAND_MAX;
                q.push(top.first, top.second);
            }
            cout << (sys_time() - start_time) << " secs for BalancedQueue" << endl;
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
}

Results on my machine:

3.023 secs for multimap
0.34 secs for BalancedQueue

2.807 secs for multimap
0.351 secs for BalancedQueue

2.771 secs for multimap
0.337 secs for BalancedQueue

2.752 secs for multimap
0.338 secs for BalancedQueue

2.742 secs for multimap
0.334 secs for BalancedQueue

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