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In Python you can append a list to itself and it will accept the assignment.

>>> l = [0,1]
>>> l.append(l)
>>> l
[0, 1, [...]]
>>> l[-1]
[0, 1, [...]]

My question is why?

Python allows this rather than throwing an error, is that because there's a potential use for it or is it just because it wasn't seen as necessary to explicitly forbid this behaviour?

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    Maybe you should see this – Bhargav Rao Apr 29 '15 at 13:47
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    Directed cyclic graphs come to mind. One simple contrived example: we want to express the relationships of a group of people. Each person is a list whose first element is their name, and every following element is a person they like. If Alice likes Bob and Carol, and Bob likes Alice, the data structure looks like ["Alice", ["Carol"], ["Bob", [...]]]. – Kevin Apr 29 '15 at 13:47
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    Given that a Python list just holds references to arbitrary objects, there's no reason it can't hold references to lists, including itself. The smart bit is in displaying an ellipsis rather than printing forever! – jonrsharpe Apr 29 '15 at 13:53
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    @BhargavRao Recursion much? – RevanProdigalKnight Apr 29 '15 at 13:53
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    @BhargavRao Best response I've gotten on here. – SuperBiasedMan Apr 29 '15 at 14:01
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is that because there's a potential use for it or is it just because it wasn't seen as necessary to explicitly forbid this behaviour?

Both. Lists store references, and there is no reason to prevent them from storing certain otherwise-valid references.

As for potential uses, consider a generic top-down-shooter type video game:

  • A Level contains a reference to each Enemy, so that it can draw and update them each frame.
  • An Enemy contains a reference to its Level, so that it can (for example) query the distance to the Player or spawn a Bullet in the Level.
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