7

The following produces a C-contiguous numpy array:

import numpy

a = numpy.ones((1024,1024,5))

Now if I slice it, the result may not longer be the same. For example:

bn = a[:, :, n]

with n from 0 to 4. My problem is that I need bn to be C-contiguous, and I need to do this for many instances of a. I just need each bn once, and want to avoid doing

bn  = bn.copy(order='C')

I also don't want to rewrite my code such that

a = numpy.ones((5,1024,1024))

Is there a faster, cheaper way to get bn than doing the copy?

Background:

I want to hash each slice of every a, using

import hashlib

hashlib.sha1(a[:, :, n]).hexdigest()

Unfortunately, this will throw a ValueError, complaining about the order. So if there is another fast way to get the hash I want, I'd also use it.

  • On a related note, I only learned about the behavior of hashlib by doing a lot of debugging until I found where that exception really came from. Shouldn't the python docs mention this? – Daniel Sk Apr 29 '15 at 15:07
4

As things stand, any attempt to coerce the slice bn to C contiguous order is going to create a copy.

If you don't want to change the shapes you're starting with (and don't need a itself in C order), one possible solution is to start with the array a in Fortran order:

>>> a = numpy.ones((1024, 1024, 5), order='f')

The slices are also then F-contiguous:

>>> bn = a[:, :, 0]
>>> bn.flags
  C_CONTIGUOUS : False
  F_CONTIGUOUS : True
  OWNDATA : False
  ...

This means that the transpose of the slice bn will be in C order and transposing does not create a copy:

>>> bn.T.flags
  C_CONTIGUOUS : True
  F_CONTIGUOUS : False
  OWNDATA : False
  ...

And you can then hash the slice:

>>> hashlib.sha1(bn.T).hexdigest()
'01dfa447dafe16b9a2972ce05c79410e6a96840e'
  • 3
    This seems to me like the correct path to a solution, but you are changing the order of the other two axes when transposing the view, which isn't nice. Something like a = numpy.ones((5, 1024, 1024)).transpose(1, 2, 0) gives you an array which is neither C nor Fortran contiguous, but which produces C-contiguous slices when indexed along the last dimension. – Jaime Apr 29 '15 at 16:20
6

To force a numpy array x to be C-contiguous, without making unnecessary copies when it's already that way to begin with, you should use,

 x = numpy.asarray(x, order='C')

Note, that if this array was not C-contiguous, it would probably be similar in terms of efficiency to x.copy(order='C'). I don't think there is a way around it. You can't reorganize the alignment of an array in memory otherwise than by making a copy of the data to a new location.

Rewriting your code so it uses the sliced index first, as in numpy.ones((5,1024,1024)) seems to be the only reasonable way of optimizing this.

5

This is a standard operation when interfacing numpy with C. Have a look at numpy.ascontiguousarray

x=numpy.ascontiguousarray(x)

is the proper way of dealing with it.

Use numpy.asfortranarray if you need fortran order.

As mentioned the function will copy if necessary. So there is no way around it. You can try rollaxis before your operation, such that the short axis is the first axis. This gives you a view on the array

In [2]: A=np.random.rand(1024,1024,5)
In [3]: B=np.rollaxis(A,2)
In [4]: B.shape
Out[4]: (5, 1024, 1024)
In [5]: B.flags
Out[5]:
  C_CONTIGUOUS : False
  F_CONTIGUOUS : False
  OWNDATA : False
  WRITEABLE : True
  ALIGNED : True
  UPDATEIFCOPY : False

In [6]: A.flags
Out[6]:
  C_CONTIGUOUS : True
  F_CONTIGUOUS : False
  OWNDATA : True
  WRITEABLE : True
  ALIGNED : True
  UPDATEIFCOPY : False

So rollaxis does not solve this either.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.