With Django REST Framework, a standard ModelSerializer will allow ForeignKey model relationships to be assigned or changed by POSTing an ID as an Integer.

What's the simplest way to get this behavior out of a nested serializer?

Note, I am only talking about assigning existing database objects, not nested creation.

I have hacked away around this in the past with additional 'id' fields in the serializer and with custom create and update methods, but this is such a seemingly simple and frequent issue for me that I'm curious to know the best way.

class Child(models.Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=20)

class Parent(models.Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=20)
    phone_number = models.ForeignKey(PhoneNumber)
    child = models.ForeignKey(Child)

class ChildSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Child

class ParentSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    # phone_number relation is automatic and will accept ID integers
    children = ChildSerializer() # this one will not

    class Meta:
        model = Parent
up vote 33 down vote accepted

The best solution here is to use two different fields: one for reading and the other for writing. Without doing some heavy lifting, it is difficult to get what you are looking for in a single field.

The read-only field would be your nested serializer (ChildSerializer in this case) and it will allow you to get the same nested representation that you are expecting. Most people define this as just child, because they already have their front-end written by this point and changing it would cause problems.

The write-only field would be a PrimaryKeyRelatedField, which is what you would typically use for assigning objects based on their primary key. This does not have to be write-only, especially if you are trying to go for symmetry between what is received and what is sent, but it sounds like that might suit you best. This field should have a source set to the foreign key field (child in this example) so it assigns it properly on creation and updating.


This has been brought up on the discussion group a few times, and I think this is still the best solution. Thanks to Sven Maurer for pointing it out.

  • Kevin thanks for your answer. I was struggling with the same kind of a problem. I've added two fields to ChildSerializer. parent = ParentSerializer(read_only=True) and parent_id =serializers.PrimaryKeyRelatedField(...., write_only=True, ....) I also added both parent and parent_id to fields of the ChildSerializer. But, I do not see any child_id field in the response. Which is good & convenient actually, but I wonder what's the reason for this? Do you have any idea? – hnroot Nov 21 '15 at 21:56
  • good answer. just missing some sample code as in skinny's answer (probably below) – molecular Jun 9 '16 at 11:27

Here's an example of what Kevin's answer is talking about, if you want to take that approach and use 2 separate fields.

In your models.py...

class Child(models.Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=20)

class Parent(models.Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=20)
    phone_number = models.ForeignKey(PhoneNumber)
    child = models.ForeignKey(Child)

then serializers.py...

class ChildSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Child

class ParentSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    # if child is required
    child = ChildSerializer(read_only=True) 
    # if child is a required field and you want write to child properties through parent
    # child = ChildSerializer(required=False)
    # otherwise the following should work (untested)
    # child = ChildSerializer() 

    child_id = serializers.PrimaryKeyRelatedField(
        queryset=Child.objects.all(), source='child', write_only=True)

    class Meta:
        model = Parent

Setting source=child lets child_id act as child would by default had it not be overridden (our desired behavior). write_only=True makes child_id available to write to, but keeps it from showing up in the response since the id already shows up in the ChildSerializer

  • 1
    I got the following error msg: Got a TypeError when calling Parent.objects.create(). This may be because you have a writable field on the serializer class that is not a valid argument to Parent.objects.create(). You may need to make the field read-only, or override the ParentSerializer.create() method to handle this correctly. – Gobi Dasu Jan 19 '17 at 7:45

Using two different fields would be ok (as @Kevin Brown and @joslarson mentioned), but I think it's not perfect (to me). Because getting data from one key (child) and sending data to another key (child_id) might be a little bit ambiguous for front-end developers. (no offense at all)


So, what I suggest here is, override the to_representation() method of ParentSerializer will do the job.

def to_representation(self, instance):
    response = super().to_representation(instance)
    response['child'] = ChildSerializer(instance.child).data
    return response



Complete representaion of Serializer

class ChildSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Child
        fields = '__all__'


class ParentSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Parent
        fields = '__all__'

    def to_representation(self, instance):
        response = super().to_representation(instance)
        response['child'] = ChildSerializer(instance.child).data
        return response



Advantage of this method?

By using this method, we don't need two separate fields for creation and reading. Here both creation and reading can be done by using child key.


Sample payload to create parent instance

{
        "name": "TestPOSTMAN_name",
        "phone_number": 1,
        "child": 1
    }



Screenshot
POSTMAN screenshot

  • 2
    I've been looking for an answer like this for days. The simplicity of this is beautiful. +1 for sure. – Bigbob556677 Oct 18 at 15:32

There is a way to substitute a field on create/update operation:

class ChildSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Child

class ParentSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    child = ChildSerializer() 

    # called on create/update operations
    def to_internal_value(self, data):
         self.fields['child'] = serializers.PrimaryKeyRelatedField(
             queryset=Child.objects.all())
         return super(ParentSerializer, self).to_internal_value(data)

    class Meta:
        model = Parent
  • If you are using DRF 3.0 this is a good solution but one thing to note is that the Parent item returned after creating Parent will not have a nested Child serialization, it will be flat (just the primary key). To fix that you need to also override the to_representation method. I add this in my answer to a duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/26561640/… – jeffjv Sep 7 '16 at 6:47
  • Thanks! I wasted my day trying to solve this issue... The selected answer doesn't work for me... – Gutimore Aug 28 at 22:44

Here's how I've solved this problem.

serializers.py

class ChildSerializer(ModelSerializer):

  def to_internal_value(self, data):
      if data.get('id'):
          return get_object_or_404(Child.objects.all(), pk=data.get('id'))
      return super(ChildSerializer, self).to_internal_value(data)

You'll just pass your nested child serializer just as you get it from the serializer ie child as a json/dictionary. in to_internal_value we instantiate the child object if it has a valid ID so that DRF can further work with the object.

I think the approach outlined by Kevin probably would be the best solution, but I couldn't ever get it to work. DRF kept throwing errors when I had both a nested serializer and a primary key field set. Removing one or the other would function, but obviously didn't give me the result I needed. The best I could come up with is creating two different serializers for reading and writing, Like so...

serializers.py:

class ChildSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Child

class ParentSerializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        abstract = True
        model = Parent
        fields = ('id', 'child', 'foo', 'bar', 'etc')

class ParentReadSerializer(ParentSerializer):
    child = ChildSerializer()

views.py

class ParentViewSet(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    serializer_class = ParentSerializer
    queryset = Parent.objects.all()
    def get_serializer_class(self):
        if self.request.method == 'GET':
            return ParentReadSerializer
        else:
            return self.serializer_class

A few people here have placed a way to keep one field but still be able to get the details when retrieving the object and create it with only the ID. I made a little more generic implementation if people are interested:

First off the tests:

from rest_framework.relations import PrimaryKeyRelatedField

from django.test import TestCase
from .serializers import ModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField, ProductSerializer
from .factories import SomethingElseFactory
from .models import SomethingElse


class TestModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField(TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        self.serializer = ModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField(
            model_serializer_class=SomethingElseSerializer,
            queryset=SomethingElse.objects.all(),
        )

    def test_inherits_from_primary_key_related_field(self):
        assert issubclass(ModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField, PrimaryKeyRelatedField)

    def test_use_pk_only_optimization_returns_false(self):
        self.assertFalse(self.serializer.use_pk_only_optimization())

    def test_to_representation_returns_serialized_object(self):
        obj = SomethingElseFactory()

        ret = self.serializer.to_representation(obj)

        self.assertEqual(ret, SomethingElseSerializer(instance=obj).data)

Then the class itself:

from rest_framework.relations import PrimaryKeyRelatedField

class ModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField(PrimaryKeyRelatedField):
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        self.model_serializer_class = kwargs.pop('model_serializer_class')
        super().__init__(**kwargs)

    def use_pk_only_optimization(self):
        return False

    def to_representation(self, value):
        return self.model_serializer_class(instance=value).data

The usage is like so, if you have a serializer somewhere:

class YourSerializer(ModelSerializer):
    something_else = ModelRepresentationPrimaryKeyRelatedField(queryset=SomethingElse.objects.all(), model_serializer_class=SomethingElseSerializer)

This will allow you to create an object with a foreign key still only with the PK, but will return the full serialized nested model when retrieving the object you created (or whenever really).

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.