70

Is ClassName.staticVaribale the only way to access static variable within the class? I want something like self, but for class. Like class.staticVariable.

2
  • 1
    you can use: type(of: self).staticVaribale
    – soumil
    Jan 11, 2020 at 10:06
  • @soumil Even better, if you have some unknown object (struct) that meets some protocol, and the protocol has a static variable/function, then your suggestion works perfectly!
    – David H
    Feb 24, 2020 at 19:05

7 Answers 7

115

There are two ways to access a static property/method from a non-static property/method:

  1. As stated in your question, you can prefix the property/method name with that of the type:

    class MyClass {
        static let staticProperty = 0
    
        func method() {
            print(MyClass.staticProperty)
        }
    }
    
  2. Swift 2: You can use dynamicType:

    class MyClass {
        static let staticProperty = 0
    
        func method() {
            print(self.dynamicType.staticProperty)
        }
    }
    

    Swift 3: You can use type(of:) (thanks @Sea Coast of Tibet):

    class MyClass {
        static let staticProperty = 0
    
        func method() {
            print(type(of: self).staticProperty)
        }
    }
    

If you're inside a static property/method you do not need to prefix the static property/method with anything:

class MyClass {
    static let staticProperty = 0

    static func staticMethod() {
        print(staticProperty)
    }
}
3
  • 5
    So if we in the same class, but in instance method, we necessary need to write that class name? It just seems weird for me since compiler can definitely infer the class of instance. I just dont want to type the same class name. Would be great if I just can type like class.staticVaribale, but it is not the case? Apr 29, 2015 at 21:21
  • 1
    I've updated my answer, sounds like you were looking to use dynamicType. Sep 27, 2015 at 20:43
  • 5
    In Swift 3 #2 would be type(of: self).staticProperty Oct 6, 2016 at 9:17
46

This is solved elegantly in Swift 5.1 you can access it via

Self.yourConstant

Reference: https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/0068-universal-self.md

36

There is a way in Swift to make Marcel's answer satisfy even most picky style-guide gods

class MyClass {

    private typealias `Self` = MyClass

    static let MyConst = 5

    func printConst() {
        print(Self.MyConst)
    }
}

That makes Self available like in protocols when you want access associated type declaration. I am not sure about Swift 1 because never tried it but in Swift 2 it works perfectly

5
  • 1
    Would be an ideal solution, if it could be more generic. Like some extension for all classes, or even for NSObject subclasses. But I think it's not possible to get dynamic class in extension statics. Nov 1, 2015 at 18:34
  • 4
    This is the best solution. There is an accepted proposal to add this to the language anyway. It would be subtly different in that Self would mean the dynamic type so if the member accessed was overridden it would use the overridden value. Basically this is the best solution as a stop-gap until this is officially part of the language.
    – jhabbott
    Jan 6, 2017 at 14:52
  • 1
    FWIW, this approach doesn't work for subclassed class functions. e.g. if you have class func thing(), Self.thing() will always call the parent class and never the sub classes.
    – GetSwifty
    Jul 18, 2018 at 18:43
  • @Peej Since the type alias is explicitly declared as private, you shouldn't assume it works for subclasses Nov 15, 2019 at 6:26
  • 1
    @EugeneBerdnikov right, but printConst() is not. Regardless, Self solves the OP issue anyway :)
    – GetSwifty
    Nov 15, 2019 at 17:53
7

In a future Swift 3 version (yet to be released) you can use Self (yes, that's with a capital) to reference to the containing class. A proposal for this was accepted, but the feature is not implemented yet.

For example:

struct CustomStruct {          
 static func staticMethod() { ... } 

 func instanceMethod() {          
   Self.staticMethod() // in the body of the type          
 }          
}

Source: https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/0068-universal-self.md

3
  • @PEEJWEEJ hence my remark that it will be coming in Swift 3.1. I'm sure implementation will follow before 3.1 is released.
    – edwardmp
    Apr 26, 2017 at 23:30
  • @PEEJWEEJ right, seems I am not up to date in this case. Then we'll have to wait but since it is accepted, it should be released in the near future.
    – edwardmp
    Apr 27, 2017 at 17:14
  • Status: Accepted with revisions. not implemented yet?
    – lee
    Oct 26, 2017 at 10:44
3

You could work around this by defining a self referencing typealias.

class MyClassWithALongName {
  typealias CLASS = MyClassWithALongName

  static let staticFoo = "foo"

  func someInstanceMethod() -> String {
    return CLASS.staticFoo
  }
}

Though the style-guide gods may not approve.

1

It looks like in Swift 4.2 the inner class and instance variable can directly access the static variable without the prefix of the class name. However, you still need the class name within a function.

class MyClass {
    static let staticProperty = 0
    let property = staticProperty //YES

    class Inner {
        func method() {
            print(staticProperty) //YES
        }
    }

    func method() {
        print(staticProperty) //NO
        print(MyClass.staticProperty) //YES
    }
}
0

I don't like the typealias way in this case. My workaround is:

class MyClass {

   static let myStaticConst: Int = 1
   var myStaticConst:Int {
      return type(of: self).myStaticConst
   }

   func method() {
      let i:Int = myStaticConst
   }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.