I want to sort out specific files depending on their names, i want a regex that returns true for file names like : 01.mp4, 99.avi, 05.mpg.

the file extensions must match exactly to the ones that i want and the filename must start with characters which can not be longer than 2 characters. the first part is done but the file extensions aren't working. need some help the regex that I have is

/^[0-9]{1,2}\.[mp4|mpg|avi]*/

but it also returns true for 01.4mp4, 01.4mp4m.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this:

/^[0-9]{1,2}\.(?:mp4|mpg|avi)$/
  • 1
    can you tell me what does ?: do here, i what i think is that is somehow limits the characters of extension – Umair Jabbar Jun 8 '10 at 8:12
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    To explain: the square brackets, [], denote a character class; [abc] means "match either a or b or c", and [a-z] means "match any character between a and z". Thus, [mp4|mpg|avi] matches any of those characters, the order being irrelevant. Parentheses, (), group regular expressions, which is what you want to do. The ?: bit tells the regex engine not to allocate a capturing group for that set of parentheses, otherwise it would be accessible with $1. – Antal Spector-Zabusky Jun 8 '10 at 8:18
  • oh alright, if I am not wrong then this simply means that () match exactly whats given, while having ?: or not wont matter that much – Umair Jabbar Jun 8 '10 at 8:22
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    Yes, in a way; you get a slight performance benefit if you use (?:...), and it might help later on in regexes where you have several capturing groups and several non-capturing groups to keep the numbering of backreferences simple. Apart from that, (...) will match exactly the same as (?:...). – Tim Pietzcker Jun 8 '10 at 13:05

I played a bit with my original regex and came up with this

/^[0-9]{1,2}\.[mp4|mpg|avi]{3}$/

and this works like a charm :)

  • 1
    Try 11.mmm. _ – kennytm Jun 8 '10 at 8:21
  • thak you for pointing this out Kenny, it didnt work indeed – Umair Jabbar Jun 8 '10 at 8:26
/^[0-9]{1,2}\.[mp4|mpg|avi]?/
  • That would make the extension optional (but non repeating), but it wouldn't solve the original problem. – Thorarin Jun 8 '10 at 8:06
  • How is it different from OP's regex and how does it solve the problem - you're confused between parenthetic groups () and character class [] – Amarghosh Jun 8 '10 at 8:08

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