9

I'm trying to write a function that takes a variable pointer and a descriptor/key and sets a new value for the variable. Ideally the pointer should be either of an object or a primitive, but I could also live with separate functions (or an additional parameter). In my code I retrieve the new value from a database also using the key, but in the following example I simplified it with dummy values so that it can be used easily in a playground:

import UIKit

func setValue(inout object: AnyObject, key: String) {
    switch key {
    case "String":
        object = "A String"
    case "UIColor":
        object = UIColor.whiteColor()
    case "Bool":
        object = true
    default:
        println("Unhandled key: \(key)")
    }
}

var string: String = "Default String"
var color: UIColor = UIColor.blackColor()
var bool: Bool = false

setValue(&string, "String")
setValue(&color, "UIColor")
setValue(&bool, "Bool")

I get the following error:

"Cannot invoke 'setValue' with an argument list of type '(inout String, key String)'"

I understand that I'm mixing Objects and Primitives here. I also tried to break it down and separate these into two functions, but even that fails:

func setValue(inout object: AnyObject, key: String) {
    switch key {
    case "UIColor":
        object = UIColor.whiteColor()
    default:
        println("Unhandled key: \(key)")
    }
}

var color: UIColor = UIColor.blackColor()
setValue(&color, "UIColor")

This also gives the same error:

"Cannot invoke 'setValue' with an argument list of type '(inout UIColor, key String)'"

If I change 'AnyObject' to 'UIColor' it works, but the point of the function is, that it takes any variable type or at least any object type (I'd write a second function using "Any" for primitives then or add another parameter)

In Objective-C I was using pointers, transferring the approach to Swift also doesn't work, same result:

func setValue(object: UnsafeMutablePointer<AnyObject>, key: String) {
    switch key {
    case "String":
        object.memory = "A String"
    case "UIColor":
        object.memory = UIColor.whiteColor()
    case "Bool":
        object.memory = true
    default:
        println("Unhandled key: \(key)")
    }
}

Does anybody have an idea what I'm missing here? Any help is much appreciated!

Thanks!

9

Better you can create a generic method like below:

func setValue<T>(inout object:T, key: String) {
    switch key {
    case "String":
        object = ("A String" as? T)!
    case "UIColor":
        object = (UIColor.whiteColor() as? T)!
    case "Bool":
        object = (true as? T)!
    default:
        println("Unhandled key: \(key)")
    }
}

And calling will be like this:

setValue(&string, key: "String")
setValue(&color, key: "UIColor")
setValue(&bool, key: "Bool")

Hope it helps!

  • 3
    If you are going to force-cast (and please don’t, there are better solutions), you can do value as! Thing rather than (value as? Thing)!. – Airspeed Velocity Apr 30 '15 at 9:52
  • 1
    This is what I was looking for! Thanks a lot! – Django Apr 30 '15 at 9:54
  • I was struggling with the same error message as the OP, so thank you for this answer! I still don't quite understand why we need to use a generic function if we're just trying to cast a subclass to its superclass, though. – Alexander Oct 1 '15 at 19:59
7

The right way to do this is to use overloading, and letting the compiler choose the appropriate bit of code at compile time, instead of switching off a string at runtime:

func setValue(inout object: String) {
    object = "A String"
}

func setValue(inout object: UIColor) {
    object = UIColor.whiteColor()
}

func setValue(inout object: Bool) {
    object = true
}

func setValue(inout object: Any) {
    println("Unhandled key: \(key)")
}

This approach wouldn’t work when you have an Any and you want to indicate to the function what type is contained in the Any… but in this case, the reason you have problems is that the compiler does know what the types are, so you can take advantage of that.

  • Thanks a lot! For the simple example a great solution. In my code I'd rather have it in one method since there's also code to retrieve the value from the DB. – Django Apr 30 '15 at 9:56
  • 1
    Factor that code out into a separate function, and then have the overloaded calls call it… – Airspeed Velocity Apr 30 '15 at 9:58
0

-Use Any instead of AnyObject to cover value types and structs.

-You may need to cast to Any before calling your method.

Example:

func swapAny( inout obj1: Any, inout obj2: Any )
{
    let temp = obj1
    obj1 = obj2
    obj2 = temp
}

use:

var fooString: Any = "Foo"
var barString: Any = "Bar"

swapAny(&fooString, obj2: &barString)
println(fooString)//prints "Bar"
  • This won’t work in combination with inout (well, it might compile… but it probably won’t have the desired effect) – Airspeed Velocity Apr 30 '15 at 9:42
  • Added example, which compiles and behaves as expected. What do you mean by 'won't have the desired effect' ? – Gregzo Apr 30 '15 at 9:47
  • This isn’t casting (i.e. someVar as Any), this is declaring the values themselves as of type Any. However, presumably the questioner has values of type String, and wants to manipulate that string in-place. Your suggestion requires them to declare that type as Any. There are better ways in most circumstances (i.e. overloading or generics). Any is rarely a good choice. – Airspeed Velocity Apr 30 '15 at 9:49
  • Thanks for the input. I have a feeling that the pattern the OP is implementing in itself may not be the most appropriate... – Gregzo Apr 30 '15 at 9:52
0

Protocol support for inout

When you cast a class to a protocol you end up with an immutable reference, which cant be used in inout function parameters. So you can:

  1. Use Method overloading (which can duplicate your code and make it congenitally harder to read, even if you refactor)
  2. Not use inout (this is what you should do)
  3. Or you can do this:

-

protocol IPositional{
    func setPosition(position:CGPoint)
}
extension IPositional{
    var positional:IPositional {get{return self as IPositional}set{}}
}
class A:IPositional{
    var position:CGPoint = CGPoint()
    func setPosition(position:CGPoint){
        self.position = position
    }
}
func test(inout positional:IPositional){
    positional.setPosition(CGPointMake(10,10))
}
var a = A()
test(&a.positional)
a.position//output: (10.0, 10.0)

Conclusion:
The benefit of doing it this way: Is that you can now have one "inout method" for all classes that implements IPositional But I recommend going with option 2. (Not using inout)

0

The type of object should match the type of parameter, including AnyObject:

func setValue(inout object: AnyObject, key: String) {
    switch key {
    case "String":
        object = "A String"
    case "UIColor":
        object = UIColor.whiteColor()
    case "Bool":
        object = true
    default:
        print("Unhandled key: \(key)")
    }
}

var string: AnyObject = "Default String"
var color: AnyObject = UIColor.blackColor()
var bool: AnyObject = false

setValue(&string, key: "String")
setValue(&color, key: "UIColor")
setValue(&bool, key: "Bool")

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