83

If I use a pixel or em value for border-radius, the edge radius is always a circular arc or a pill shape even if the value is greater than the largest side of the element.

When I use percentages, the edge radius is elliptic and starts at the middle of each side of the element resulting in an oval or ellipse shape :

pixel (px) border radiuspercent (%) border-radius

Pixel value for border-radius :

div {
   background: teal;
   border-radius: 999px;
   width: 230px;
   height: 100px;
   padding: 40px 10px;
   box-sizing: border-box;
   font-family: courier;
   color: #fff;
 }
<div>border-radius:999px;</div>

Percent value for border-radius :

div {
  background: teal;
  border-radius: 50%;
  width: 230px;
  height: 100px;
  padding:40px 10px;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  font-family:courier;
  color:#fff;
}
<div>border-radius:50%;</div>

Why doesn't border radius in percentages act the same way as border-radius set with pixel or em values?

139

Border-radius :

First, you need to understand that the border-radius property takes 2 values. These values are the radii on the X/Y axis of a quarter ellipse defining the shape of the corner.
If only one of the values is set then the second value is equal to the first one. So border-radius: x is equivalent to border-radius:x/x;.

Percentages values

Refering to the W3C specs : CSS Backgrounds and Borders Module Level 3 border-radius property this is what we can read concerning percentage values:

Percentages: Refer to corresponding dimension of the border box.

So border-radius:50%; defines the raddi of the ellipse this way :

  • the radii on the X axis is 50% of the containers width
  • the radii on the Y axis is 50% of the containers height

Border-radius in percentage (%) make an ellipsis

Pixel and other units

Using one value other than a percentage for border radius (em, in, viewport related units, cm...) will always result in an ellipse with the same X/Y radii. In other words, a circle.

When you set border-radius:999px; the radii of the circle should be 999px. But another rule is applied when the curves overlap reducing the radii of the circle to half the size of the smallest side. So in your example it is equal to half the height of the element : 50px.

Border-radius in pixels (px) make a pill shape


For this example (with a fixed size element) you can obtain the same result with both px and percentages. As the element is 230px x 100px, border-radius: 50%; is equivalent to border-radius:115px/50px; (50% of both sides) :

div {
  display: inline-block;
  background: teal;
  width: 230px;
  height: 100px;
  padding: 40px 10px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  font-family: courier;
  font-size: 0.8em;
  color: #fff;
}
.percent {
  border-radius: 50%;
}
.pixels {
  border-radius: 115px/50px;
}
<div class="percent">border-radius:50%;</div>
<div class="pixels">border-radius:115px/50px;</div>

  • 3
    Excellent answer. It's a pity that percentage radius values are calculated separately for width and height. It means that I can't get circular corners that scale with the size of the object, without knowing the aspect ratio of the object. Wouldn't it be nice if the percentage applied to the larger of the objects dimensions? – Chris Dennis May 6 '16 at 13:11
  • 2
    @ChrisDennis That isn't true. Like OP said, you can simply use border-radius: 999px;. That way you get your circular corners and be sure that they scale with your element – Gust van de Wal Sep 25 '16 at 15:33
  • 6
    But I might not want semi-circular ends to the box. I'd like to be able to specify x-radius as, say, 10% of the box's width and y-radius equal to x-radius. – Chris Dennis Sep 25 '16 at 15:45
  • 3
    Hey did you do other self answered post like this ? I'd appreciate reading those. – Ced Jan 5 '17 at 4:12
  • 3
    But what actually works with percentage is: border-radius: 50%/100% (Tested in Chrome 60 + 61) – denns Sep 12 '17 at 9:39
3

Just divide the first value by the % you want.. so if you want a border-radius of 50%, write:

border-radius: 25%/50%; 

or another example:

border-radius: 15%/30%;

You can easily do the math in js or SASS.

0

Not an actual answer to the question but a usability advice for anyone that might stumble upon it:

If you want to use a relative unit but don't want the elliptical behaviour of % you can always use em or rem. E.g. border-readius: 1em;

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