I'm trying to do something that I thought would be pretty basic but either I'm just ignoring something obvious or it is actually a bit tricky. My problem is: I have an array of 4 chars that contains 4 hex values. For example:

array[0] = 0xD8
array[1] = 0xEC
array[2] = 0xA2 
array[3] = 0x83

I want to store this array in an integer with the combined value, in this case 0xD8ECA283

I've tried doing logical OR and then shifting the bits and with this method I managed to store the value of 0xD8 in the integer, but not the rest. Any tips would be appreciated.

  • 1
    Show the code and we'll help you from there. – Filipe Gonçalves Apr 30 '15 at 13:31
  • Why not just work with the array as if it were a pointer to an integer? E.g. int integer = *((int*)array). – Witiko Apr 30 '15 at 13:31
  • 3
    @Witiko Because of Endianness. – dasblinkenlight Apr 30 '15 at 13:32
  • 1
    @Witiko That may not work due to endianness issues. The value you get will be different depending on whether it's a big-endian or little-endian plaform – Filipe Gonçalves Apr 30 '15 at 13:33
  • 1
    @Witiko: Also you might face alignment issues. – alk Apr 30 '15 at 13:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should do it:

int i;
int combined = 0;
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
    combined = (combined << 8) | ((unsigned char) array[i]);
}
  • 1
    Wow, this is actually pretty close to what I was trying so at least I was at the right track. Should have kept at it longer. Anyway, thanks for the help – Jesper Evertsson Apr 30 '15 at 13:51

Use the binary or operator, and an integer whose precision is guaranteed to be at least 32 bits, which is the type unsigned long (although the type uint_least32_t could be also used).

Unsigned integer is used so any potential undefined and/or implementation defined behavior that is present when shifting signed integers is avoided.

This solution is independent of endianness.

unsigned long a = ( ( ( unsigned long )array[0] & 0xFF ) << 24 ) |
                  ( ( ( unsigned long )array[1] & 0xFF ) << 16 ) |
                  ( ( ( unsigned long )array[2] & 0xFF ) << 8 ) |
                  ( ( ( unsigned long )array[3] & 0xFF ) << 0 ) ;

Casts to ( unsigned long ) are made to avoid intermediate implicit conversion to int.
The & 0xFF operation is there to remove unnecessary bits(if there were any in an unlikely scenario where CHAR_BIT != 8).

  • The << 0is redundant, of course – DrKoch Apr 30 '15 at 13:43
  • 2
    redundant but helps readability in my opinion. – rfreytag Apr 30 '15 at 13:44
  • 1
    @DrKoch Yes, it was intentional for consistency and readability. – 2501 Apr 30 '15 at 13:46
  • 1
    This solved my problem, but I accepted another answer because I thought it was a bit easier to read. But thanks anyway – Jesper Evertsson Apr 30 '15 at 13:53

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.