11

I have a database.yml file like

development:
  adapter: mysql2
  encoding: utf8
  database: d360
  host: localhost
  username: root
  password: password

test:
  adapter: mysql2
  encoding: utf8
  database: sample
  host: localhost
  username: root
  password: password

Now, I want value of database of test environment (that is sample for the YAML shown). How can we do that using sed?

11

That is fairly easy, not using sed, but with appropriate shell tools. First, if you need to preserve sample in a variable for later use, then something like the following will work using bash substring replacement to isolate sample on the Test:/database: line:

$ db=$(grep -A3 'test:' database.yml | tail -n1); db=${db//*database: /}; echo "$db"
sample

or for a shorter solution that you can dump to the command line, remove the variable and command substitution and use a tool like cut:

$ grep -A3 'test:' database.yml | tail -n1 | cut -c 13-
sample

or, with awk, simply:

$ grep -A3 'test:' database.yml | tail -n1 | awk '{ print $2}'
sample

All of the different ways can be used inside command substitution (i.e. var=$(stuff) ) to store sample in var, it is just a matter of which you would rather use. I think you get the idea.

  • Thank you so much David. This is what i was looking for :) – user3078630 May 5 '15 at 12:40
  • I've seen this before db=${db//*database: /}, but what/how do we call this? – bretonics Jan 16 at 18:24
  • 1
    @bretonics - that is a parameter expansion with substring replacement. It takes the existing variable db in =${db then will replace every occurrence // of *database: with /... (nothing). (note the closing '/' is implied). So you are simply removing every occurrence of *database: from db and assigning the modified result back to db. – David C. Rankin Jan 16 at 23:00
3

YAML obviously isn't natively supported in shell. But sed also isn't a YAML parser. Neither are grep, tail, cut, etc. I'm pretty sure you'd need an actual language in which to write a proper parser. Awk, perl, python, erlang, etc.

You could use sed or shell or somesuch if you know that your YAML data will always be formatted in a certain way or hold certain values in a particular order, but to make a parser that will work generally, and on any ol' YAML file you point it at, you'll need to emulate the parsers that already exist in other languages.

If you don't want to write your own (perhaps asking the StackOverflow community for help once you have some code to consider), then one option might be to install a tool like shyaml which can accurately parse files and give you authoritative content. A quick solution easily implemented into your scripts, though it has some dependencies (python).

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