1

This question already has an answer here:

Suppose I want to make a function like

int indexOf ( char * str, char c )
{
   // returns the index of the chracter c in the string str 
   // returns -1 if c is not a character of str
  int k = 0;  
  while (*str)
  { 
      if (*str == c) break;
      else ++str;
  }
  return *str ? k : -1;  
}

but I want to make it as reliable as possible. For instance, the above only works if the largest int is guaranteed to be greater than or equal to the maximum size of a character array. How can I cover all my bases in pure C?

marked as duplicate by vsoftco, Jens Gustedt, Community Apr 30 '15 at 15:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Why reinvent the wheel? – dasblinkenlight Apr 30 '15 at 14:54
  • 1
    size_t is present in C99 standard, what do you mean by saying "pure C"? – myaut Apr 30 '15 at 14:56
  • Were you supposed to be incrementing k inside that loop? – Hurkyl Apr 30 '15 at 14:59
  • What exactly means "For instance, the above only works if the largest int is guaranteed to be greater than or equal to the maximum size of a character array"? I'm trying to understand the question. – Shondeslitch Apr 30 '15 at 15:02
  • 1
    @Shondeslitch he means if INT_MAX>=strlen(str) – eventHandler Apr 30 '15 at 15:05
9

size_t

No, seriously. size_t is a standard C type. It's defined in <stddef.h>.

(that was the answer to "What is the equivalent of “size_t” in C?")

For the exact function like you wrote, strchr would be more suitable - the caller could use it like this:

const char* str = "Find me!find mE";
char* pos = strchr(str, '!');
if(pos) // found the char
{
    size_t index = (pos - str); // get the index
    // do the other things
}
else
{
    // char not found
}

So, in general, if you want to find something in the array provided by user, returning a pointer is most idiomatic in C.

You could return ssize_t (which includes all the possible values of size_t, and -1), but it's not standard C, so I don't recommend it. I only mention it for completeness.

  • 1
    I think OP would be curious of how to deal with return -1 part of his code. – dasblinkenlight Apr 30 '15 at 14:57
  • 1
    OP is aware of size_t existing. However your answer doesn't show how to return a -1 or equivalent. – 2501 Apr 30 '15 at 15:02
  • @2501 I think that the question only need how to know if the char is in the string and the index. If the return is different to -1, while you know which is the return that confirm what you want is ok. (However, you are correct) – Shondeslitch Apr 30 '15 at 15:06
4

Use a pointer.

You will always be able to return a pointer to a valid element in an array. The not-found condition is signaled by returning a NULL.

  • 2
    Why the downvote? This is the proper way of doing strchr in C, no questions about it. – dasblinkenlight Apr 30 '15 at 14:57
0

Interpreting your question as:

How to not rely in index size for pointer arithmetic?

The answer would be:

int indexOf ( char * str, char c )
{
    // returns the index of the chracter c in the string str 
    // returns -1 if c is not a character of str
    char *aux = str;  
    while (*aux != c )
    { 
        if (*aux == '\0')
            return -1;
        aux++;
    }
    return aux - str; 
}
  • The division is wrong anyway, if it was for another type. ptr + 1 points at the next element, not at the next byte. – milleniumbug Apr 30 '15 at 15:25
  • You are right, I though the operation between two pointers would ignore the type size. – Jonatan Goebel Apr 30 '15 at 15:36

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