14

I was forwarded a p12 file from a client with the push cert.

Can I change the password of this p12 file without any ramifications and if yes, can I use something like this:

openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates.p12 -out temp.pem -passin pass: -passout        
pass:temppassword
openssl pkcs12 -export -in temp.pem -out Certificates-final.p12 -passin     
pass:temppassword -passout pass:newpa­ssword
rm -rf temp.pem

I found this on this website here

  • Are you asking if there will be a problem with using the p12 file or if there is a problem with the command? – Oliver Atkinson Feb 2 '16 at 17:09
  • I was asking if there would be a problem with the p12 file – heLL0 Feb 3 '16 at 19:06
3

There will be no problem.

PFX is an encrypted container, changing the password of the container will have no effect on the certificates inside the container.

  • But you have not explained a way of "changing the password of the container". Re-creating the PKCS#12 container definitely has an effect. – nyov Jun 17 '18 at 16:35
5

No you cannot do so without ramifications.
Exporting PKCS#12 contents with openssl will lose information which won't be restored upon re-creation of the PKCS#12.
Whether that metadata is important to you will depend on your PKCS#12 contents and your use-case.

There does not seem to be a way of simply "changing the password of the container" with openssl. (However, you can use Java's keytool to do this, as I explain later.)

TL;DR: use this instead of your openssl command: keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore source.p12 -srcstoretype PKCS12 -srcstorepass:file ssp -destkeystore dest.p12 -deststoretype PKCS12 -deststorepass:file dsp -destkeypass:file dsp

OpenSSL

Here is a comparison between a re-created PKCS#12 and it's original, from an old (and invalid) german tax login keystore I had for testing.

In my case a PKCS#12 re-created in this way was no longer valid/working for the intended application (certificate-based login) so I had to find a different solution.

Short overview (the original, then the re-created file):

$ openssl pkcs12 -info -in Certificates.p12 -noout
Enter Import Password:
MAC:sha1 Iteration 1024
PKCS7 Data
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 1024
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 1024
PKCS7 Encrypted data: pbeWithSHA1And40BitRC2-CBC, Iteration 1024
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag

$ openssl pkcs12 -info -in Certificates-final.p12 -noout
Enter Import Password:
MAC:sha1 Iteration 2048
PKCS7 Encrypted data: pbeWithSHA1And40BitRC2-CBC, Iteration 2048
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
PKCS7 Data
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 2048

And now a diff between the original exported PEM file contents, and the re-exported PEM of the re-created PKCS#12. (I have redacted some base64 lines and also re-ordered the PEM data in the output to make the diff shorter and the changes more obvious.)
You can see the original had two private keys (a signaturekey and an encryptionkey) while the new one only has one, as well as lost metadata on the Certificate bags. Also note how the localKeyID's have been changed:

$ openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates.p12 -out temp.pem
$ openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates-final.p12 -out temp2.pem

$ diff -up temp.pem temp2.pem
--- temp.pem
+++ temp2.pem
@@ -1,74 +1,38 @@
 Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: encryptionkey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 47 44
+    localKeyID: DD 42 1D 23 0E 11 BB D7 0D 54 B7 10 D0 C6 F5 40 B6 B5 2C A4
 Key Attributes: <No Attributes>
 -----BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
-MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQIpJIbNX5suS8CAggA
-MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECEUOqFMc2ya4BIIEyKcSq/QtaSQe
-KaGI+xHwWXmJ8kPova4Ypjy9ELFYH/qpOlfyvE2NUE8sTPfMmTGZfVgmzajZiAkv
-2bGbJJqotmBnX7Kq4R+p8rAsMNQeyc6Hz6HOFHB2u51m/+v6U89BnxZjzYPfBLrL
-mtEJJoEKLrwjh4lCZuEQjQ==
+MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQIStmsb0FWO6ECAggA
+MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECFnnIOcMl607BIIEyJeDvQMny+9a
+g38QaURLMHGW1ZcSl1SQL3aISeF9OOVNDT6SdpH9ta+ZiBL47KYYRmzb/mrkAk8w
+xEdaY/v8/l4zo86XS3ZXX9/59rieb3YAm6GfyTAYyAwU+xMz0FHPtWjN0sWKFamx
+49Gel9yYCtfc9oRKdvaBuQ==
 -----END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
 Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: signaturekey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 41 41
-Key Attributes: <No Attributes>
------BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
-MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQIw8wbVkc1YxICAggA
-MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECCUFgpxoljgKBIIEyCIseTm0Y7uL
-6IaAqRqwPxb64iBLLN9E/XOkA5ZAzO4MgSsZieZQfpXLJPdTdnKx9WauzpDGVfs5
-p+i5Dmrl9olI2wEOCGdoG7YzzVh4SoTAf/4v9yJRylCXREoYDdK/EM09Am1XWRVa
-fqNaWVRO/1vfv7Rgc2Mwbw==
------END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: encryptionkey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 47 44
+    localKeyID: DD 42 1D 23 0E 11 BB D7 0D 54 B7 10 D0 C6 F5 40 B6 B5 2C A4
 subject=/serialNumber=991954729C/CN=991954729
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -96,8 +60,7 @@ QmpEFSHJxYXOtyar3x9Viad9r9KtcVViJxe/cpVE
 u4rfbLegLqZsXPVlY+6+k/vokTD9Oc0IdXHNk1u1dSTUc4rvxohZAxKW+5/EoLar
 +AajwQNu5CmFz76Y6tDOS7XqUFkdu6JNMvBfuFNAng2GXwo/l8LsstAz/w==
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA,OU=CA,O=Elster,C=DE
+Bag Attributes: <No Attributes>
 subject=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -126,8 +89,7 @@ SxtMZZVZ6RuHLwfz+QYJ+uKghjImnZ7Gy93+S1yD
 FwWQnJ1RBEUTIwMI9rrIGH5R4sUzfeS6YvJOCTcO372IC1CKRpx3odvLFR+FYM7/
 nO/mlyfpTHkJrRm1IavqyBq0rUKbTUP7
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: CN=ElsterRootCA,OU=RootCA,O=Elster,C=DE
+Bag Attributes: <No Attributes>
 subject=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -156,9 +118,7 @@ EgzvybfTPjUTXr4G1FZyAJkUAw4EdHZ8K2fIijy6
 VThgfYVrIfjKr00WsIW1QC3aWWCfgs19UjeLOPtydDgsU+UBAZg/fFTKYwQpx1Jg
 n8L8DNLudrfbsj6m7Ir39fVi634a+v9k
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: signaturekey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 41 41
+Bag Attributes: <No Attributes>
 subject=/serialNumber=991954729A/CN=991954729
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -186,8 +146,7 @@ vByFoXLDf57jp0k2wGws31IBsPDmzlhlwziMstzk
 u4rfbLegLqZsXPVlY+6+k/vokTD9Oc0IdXHNk1u1dSTUc4rvxohZAxKW+5/EoLar
 zH7xfL59iS81Ok7F3kyWroq7Y6L5iG3+aXEVJyA9FfuGY2dKSVliqNQzEA==
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA,OU=CA,O=Elster,C=DE
+Bag Attributes: <No Attributes>
 subject=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -216,8 +175,7 @@ SxtMZZVZ6RuHLwfz+QYJ+uKghjImnZ7Gy93+S1yD
 jftsxZFkkWV/2zx5Lw/pTruKSlWx4bSC9oWB9Tk1w10ST80JsVCFoeezonHq8zLF
 nO/mlyfpTHkJrRm1IavqyBq0rUKbTUP7
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
-Bag Attributes
-    friendlyName: CN=ElsterRootCA,OU=RootCA,O=Elster,C=DE
+Bag Attributes: <No Attributes>
 subject=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=RootCA/CN=ElsterRootCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

Besides the lost metadata, losing a private key on import here, seems actually quite problematic to me. So make certain to test your new PKCS#12, and possibly back up your old one in a safe location!
Tested with

$ openssl version
OpenSSL 1.1.0f  25 May 2017

keytool

keytool is a key and certificate management utility and is part of the Java JRE, for managing Java's keystore. In this case I use OpenJDK's version.
You might find this (on Linux) as /usr/bin/keytool, or in your Java installation, e.g. at /usr/lib/jvm/java-8-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/keytool.

With keytool you can change only the container password (keystore password), without touching any keys inside (which is probably not what you want, though):

$ keytool -list -storetype pkcs12 -keystore Certificates.p12
Enter keystore password:
Keystore type: PKCS12
Keystore provider: SunJSSE

Your keystore contains 2 entries

encryptionkey, Jan 1, 2012, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): DD:42:1D:23:0E:11:BB:D7:0D:54:B7:10:D0:C6:F5:40:B6:B5:2C:A4
signaturekey, Jan 1, 2012, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): 18:F6:3F:FA:29:79:08:18:34:9A:99:CA:B7:47:AD:B0:36:49:A2:EB

Now we change the container password: This overwrites the old file

$ keytool -storetype pkcs12 -keystore Certificates.p12 -storepasswd
Enter keystore password:
New keystore password:
Re-enter new keystore password:

And compare the results:

$ keytool -list -storetype pkcs12 -keystore Certificates.p12
Enter keystore password:
Keystore type: PKCS12
Keystore provider: SunJSSE

Your keystore contains 2 entries

encryptionkey, Jan 1, 2012, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): DD:42:1D:23:0E:11:BB:D7:0D:54:B7:10:D0:C6:F5:40:B6:B5:2C:A4
signaturekey, Jan 1, 2012, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): 18:F6:3F:FA:29:79:08:18:34:9A:99:CA:B7:47:AD:B0:36:49:A2:EB

$ openssl pkcs12 -info -in Certificates.p12 -noout
Enter Import Password:
MAC:sha1 Iteration 100000
PKCS7 Data
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 1024
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 1024
PKCS7 Encrypted data: pbeWithSHA1And40BitRC2-CBC, Iteration 50000
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag

So keytool upgraded the iteration count, but the key alias information (encryptionkey/signaturekey) and file order in the container has been retained.

Note, however, that this only changes the password of the PKCS#12 keystore, it does not touch the passwords of any encrypted private keys. This is useful if you use PKCS#12 to store different keys with different encryption passphrases. But it also means that you need to remember all of them, and you can no longer export these keys using openssl, as openssl can only handle keys that share the same password as the PKCS#12 container:

$ openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates.p12 -out temp0.pem
Enter Import Password:
Error outputting keys and certificates
140661347983616:error:06065064:digital envelope routines:EVP_DecryptFinal_ex:bad decrypt:../crypto/evp/evp_enc.c:535:
140661347983616:error:23077074:PKCS12 routines:PKCS12_pbe_crypt:pkcs12 cipherfinal error:../crypto/pkcs12/p12_decr.c:63:
140661347983616:error:2306A075:PKCS12 routines:PKCS12_item_decrypt_d2i:pkcs12 pbe crypt error:../crypto/pkcs12/p12_decr.c:94:

You can then only export certificates from this file, using -nokeys:

$ openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates.p12 -out temp0.pem -nokeys

Finally, to actually change the keystore/container password and the encrypted key password(s) inside (WHICH IS most likely WHAT YOU WANT), you can use this magic invocation:

$ keytool -importkeystore \
    -srckeystore "${SRCFILE}" -srcstoretype PKCS12 -srcstorepass:file ssp \
    -destkeystore "${DSTFILE}" -deststoretype PKCS12 -deststorepass:file dsp -destkeypass:file dsp

Importing keystore Certificates.p12 to Certificates-final.p12...
Entry for alias encryptionkey successfully imported.
Entry for alias signaturekey successfully imported.
Import command completed:  2 entries successfully imported, 0 entries failed or cancelled

$ rm ssp dsp

Where SRCFILE and DSTFILE are your PKCS#12 files respectively, and ssp and dsp are files that you safely wrote your source- and dest-passphrases to, earlier (keytool can also read from environment variables using :env instead of :file. And you can pass the passphrases on the commandline, but remember that that is unsafest and logged in your shell history.)

After now having re-created the PKCS#12, you can verify that the metadata and order of the contents was preserved:

$ keytool -list -storetype pkcs12 -keystore Certificates-final.p12
Enter keystore password:
Keystore type: PKCS12
Keystore provider: SunJSSE

Your keystore contains 2 entries

encryptionkey, Jun 17, 2018, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): DD:42:1D:23:0E:11:BB:D7:0D:54:B7:10:D0:C6:F5:40:B6:B5:2C:A4
signaturekey, Jun 17, 2018, PrivateKeyEntry,
Certificate fingerprint (SHA1): 18:F6:3F:FA:29:79:08:18:34:9A:99:CA:B7:47:AD:B0:36:49:A2:EB

$ openssl pkcs12 -info -in Certificates-final.p12 -noout
Enter Import Password:
MAC:sha1 Iteration 100000
PKCS7 Data
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 50000
Shrouded Keybag: pbeWithSHA1And3-KeyTripleDES-CBC, Iteration 50000
PKCS7 Encrypted data: pbeWithSHA1And40BitRC2-CBC, Iteration 50000
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag
Certificate bag

$ openssl pkcs12 -in Certificates-final.p12 -out temp3.pem
Enter Import Password:
Enter PEM pass phrase:
Verifying - Enter PEM pass phrase:
Enter PEM pass phrase:
Verifying - Enter PEM pass phrase:

(again, I have redacted some base64 lines of the PEM for brevity)

$ diff -up temp.pem temp3.pem
--- temp.pem
+++ temp3.pem
@@ -1,74 +1,74 @@
 Bag Attributes
     friendlyName: encryptionkey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 47 44
+    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 45 62 39 32 65 75 33 40 45 47 47 42
 Key Attributes: <No Attributes>
 -----BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
-MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQI/f7cW8Pvi6MCAggA
-MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECErznPIoMLg5BIIEyImqsql6iZH7
-I+ig1yWIlimEVNmSlgT1klEFnR83b8rIohq4cvX8lcrCs/5POc22023zlHx8dSnB
-+3OxV/uoGIwU3IhXlNb41dt3fF349dbnwJrDcv4Fw3lfc0v2Wl3P1b17P9/LJeUa
-EmmUy4UHQU2THwLQctyD1A==
+MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQI9UYIDREjVVYCAggA
+MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECLWYUFhHE9lJBIIEyOIA+7TqLJ+V
+lpHBcm4GIwfiEuCRHBBxHg1QGeEN7MHW5imXe4ktFPlYJFU5jCZeHVyP+mkEEiNL
+PbozodEkdGweAGnpE2+wbOQOl67q+XdICgqRZAosjBUSnBOFYH0Lk8Gr/n0NNrdR
+yohBYL8PfeKyAzL4wKm5hQ==
 -----END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
 Bag Attributes
     friendlyName: signaturekey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 41 41
+    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 45 62 39 32 65 75 33 40 45 46 43 40
 Key Attributes: <No Attributes>
 -----BEGIN ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
-MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQI8VzhkYDa8/oCAggA
-MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECIP5tmyQb2b/BIIEyNGpbxkv286e
-5gjectU9q6yecwP6/w2jGLN3jNwsUN3+3Zn92BRoPKsn5j5WryP4G/mu0QJnLmFM
-Cy92Cu41oUeR+q9ePmj+Z1Tjj//8uq4D5F0wZhcPjnhNqdnENfLxkt+CGywoX25A
-4Ia+Pt5EmZmx9vpca4j13Q==
+MIIFHDBOBgkqhkiG9w0BBQ0wQTApBgkqhkiG9w0BBQwwHAQIN7z1PFx1ONACAggA
+MAwGCCqGSIb3DQIJBQAwFAYIKoZIhvcNAwcECFI18ERY6QXpBIIEyIDmBKgCkqbK
+HF9qm8etjBpoyuBtElaNNyeQA9QwYCD2I0vYsPVcOGRE8VO6LmmFXIvx/KcK8rxi
+QSb4K6eM2VcrZqBqw6hHONi5/CkxYQpBcHCLOH+V/CR4i2BHu7pl/JdAIx/7emMX
+ul0+m+zoGCHlpWuOkCSe+A==
 -----END ENCRYPTED PRIVATE KEY-----
 Bag Attributes
     friendlyName: encryptionkey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 47 44
+    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 45 62 39 32 65 75 33 40 45 47 47 42
 subject=/serialNumber=991954729C/CN=991954729
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ n8L8DNLudrfbsj6m7Ir39fVi634a+v9k
 -----END CERTIFICATE-----
 Bag Attributes
     friendlyName: signaturekey
-    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 43 63 35 33 6D 7A 30 45 44 47 41 41
+    localKeyID: 54 4B 6A 30 42 67 45 62 39 32 65 75 33 40 45 46 43 40
 subject=/serialNumber=991954729A/CN=991954729
 issuer=/C=DE/O=Elster/OU=CA/CN=ElsterIdNrSoftCA
 -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----

And we see that the private keys have been re-encrypted (updated timestamp shown by keytool), but compared to openssl's output, this time, aside from the change in iteration count, only the localKeyID has changed.
Everything is still in there, and in the original order. Much better!

Whether that is close enough to the original file, again, depends on your use-case. The upgraded iteration count better protects against brute-force attacks on the keys, but could potentially be fatal if you need to use them with an old Browser or OS which can't handle such high iteration counts. (Since those are of the IE 4.0 and WinNT age, however, this should not be a problem in most cases.)

Using this procedure with keytool, I could change the password of my PKCS#12 keys in a way that was still useable and valid for my application.

4

I just stumbled across this page. Does it work?

To avoid dead links here is the contents of the blog post:

With following procedure you can change your password on an .pfx certificate using openssl.

Export you current certificate to a passwordless pem type: [user@hostname]>openssl pkcs12 -in mycert.pfx -out tmpmycert.pem -nodes Enter Import Password: MAC verified OK

Convert the passwordless pem to a new pfx file with password: [user@hostname]openssl pkcs12 -export -out mycert2.pfx -in tmpmycert.pem Enter Export Password: Verifying - Enter Export Password:

Remove the temporary file: [user@hostname]rm tmpmycert.pem

Now you are done and can use the new mycert2.pfx file with your new password.

1

Using keytool there is no need to export anything and you won't lose any information. keytool can be used to change both passwords (keystore and private key). The key (excuse the pun) here is to change to password of the private key first. Otherwise, if the keystore password is different than the private key, keytool will not be able to change the password of the private key.

First change the password of the private key: keytool -keystore <your.p12> -keypasswd -alias <alias_of_private_key>

Then change the password of the keystore: keytool -keystore <your.p12> -storepasswd

That's all there is to it.

(Note: This method will still modify the iteration count the same way that @nyov's method does.)

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