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how would one go about parsing a random string (which contains all sorts of characters) into something coherent?

For example, string = '{"letters" : '321"}{}"'}{'{}{{}"': "stack{}}{"}' I'd like to make separate into: {"letters" : '321"}{}"'} and {'{}{{}"': "stack{}}{"}

I've tried iterating through string and counting each open bracket { and subtracting when a close bracket } shows up. However this doesn't work because there are instances wherein the brackets are inside "" or '' my code was something along the lines of:

list1 = []  # list1 is where we build up the first string
list2 = []  # list2 is where we keep the strings after building
for c in string:
    list1.append(c)
    if c == "{":
        bracket_counter += 1
    elif c == "}":
        bracket_counter -= 1
        if bracket_counter == 0:
            list2.append("".join(item)) 
            list1 = []

using this code, the first string that is considered "complete" is {"letters" : '321"} even though it should be {"letters" : '321"}{}"'}

I'm pretty unfamiliar with regex, so I'm not sure if this is something I should be using it for. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks!

  • 1
    Regular expressions are a bad choice for parsing, which is what you need to do here. – Steven Rumbalski Apr 30 '15 at 18:18
  • You realize your brackets are unbalanced, right? – Shashank Apr 30 '15 at 18:19
  • this isn't really something Regex would do, more importantly a human can't look at that an discern anything... – abc123 Apr 30 '15 at 18:21
  • you wouldn't use a regex, you'd use many regexes to match the tokens in the input and then a parser to build structures of the tokens. – Antti Haapala Apr 30 '15 at 18:22
  • 1
    Your separation in the example does not seem to follow any obvious logic. You need to explain further why you separated at that point. – Shashank Apr 30 '15 at 18:23
2

You'd use a regular expression to tokenize your string, and then you'd iterate over these tokens. For example:

SQ = r"'[^']*'"   # single-quoted string
DQ = r'"[^"]*"'   # double-quoted string
OPS = r'[{}:]'    # operators
WS = r'\s+'       # whitespace
     # add more types as needed...
tokens = '(?:' + '|'.join([OPS, SQ, DQ, WS]) + ')'
pattern = re.compile(tokens, re.DOTALL)

def tokenize(source):
    start = 0
    end = len(source)
    while start < end:
        match = pattern.match(source, start)
        if match:
            yield match.group(0)
        else:
            raise ValueError('Invalid syntax at character %d' % start)

        start = match.end()

Then you can run your for loop on these tokens:

for token in tokenize(string):
    ...

The tokens in case of your example input are:

>>> for token in tokenize(string):
...     print(token)
'{'
'"letters"'
' '
':'
' '
'\'321"}{}"\''
'}'
'{'
'\'{}{{}"\''
':'
' '
'"stack{}}{"'
'}'

And as you can see, from this you can count the '{' and '}' correctly.


Notice that the regular expression above has no notion of escaping the ' or " in the strings; if you want \ to escape the end letter, and it tokenized properly, you can change the SQ and DQ regexes into

SQ = r"'(?:[^\\']|\\.)*'"
DQ = r'"(?:[^\\"]|\\.)*"'

Also, if you want any other characters to be also allowed but not handled specially, you can add the

NON_SPECIAL = r'[^\'"]'

as the last branch to the regex:

tokens = '(?:' + '|'.join([OPS, SQ, DQ, WS, NON_SPECIAL]) + ')'
| improve this answer | |
0

You would also have to check whether you are in a string or not. A simple way would be to make another variable and skip loops if you are in a string and it is not the closing character.

bracket_counter = 0
quote = ""
list1 = []  # list1 is where we build up the first string
list2 = []  # list2 is where we keep the strings after building
for c in string:
    list1.append(c)
    if not quote or c == quote:  # If quote is blank or found the closing quote
        quote = ""
        if c == "{":
            bracket_counter += 1
        elif c == "}":
            bracket_counter -= 1
            if bracket_counter == 0:
                list2.append("".join(item)) 
                list1 = []
        elif c in "'\"":  # If the character is a quote character
            quote = c  # Will skip loops until quote is found

If you wanted a regex, you're first would emulate:

{.*?}

But you want to ignore quotes, so you would do:

{((".*?")|('.*?')|.)*?}

Basically, this takes advantage of lazy quantifiers. It tries to find quoted things as "…", then '…' then finally picks any character.

If you would not like to use lazy quantifiers, use the regex:

{("[^"]*"|'[^']*'|[^{}])*}

This gives the code:

import re

def parse(s):
    return [group[0] for group in re.findall("({((\".*?\")|('.*?')|.)*?})", s)]

Usage:

>>> string = """{"letters" : '321"}{}"'}{'{}{{}"': "stack{}}{"}"""
>>> parse(string)
['{"letters" : \'321"}{}"\'}', '{\'{}{{}"\': "stack{}}{"}']
>>> print(", ".join(parse(string)))
{"letters" : '321"}{}"'}, {'{}{{}"': "stack{}}{"}
| improve this answer | |

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