5

In all of the JavaScript operator precedence charts I can find (like this one and this one), the logical AND (&&) has slightly higher precedence to the logical OR (||).

I can't seem to figure out an expression where the result is different than it would be if they had the same precedence. I figure there must be some way for it to matter or they'd be listed as having the same precedence if it didn't.

For example:

0 || 2 && 0 || 3

is 3, but it doesn't matter how I slice that up, it's always going to be 3:

(0 || 2) && 0 || 3

0 || (2 && 0) || 3

(0 || 2 && 0) || 3

0 || 2 && (0 || 3)

0 || (2 && 0 || 3)

If I make that first 0 something else (like 4), the result is always 4 because the first || doesn't even look at the right-hand side. If I swap the 0 and 3 in the last || around, the result remains 3.

The closest I've come is

0 || false && "" || NaN

...which is NaN, whereas

0 || false && ("" || NaN)

...is false, but I think that's explained purely by the left-to-right semantics, not by && being higher precedence.

I must just be missing it, for what expression does it matter that && has a higher precedence than ||?

  • just making a guess: as a fallback maybe? – maioman May 1 '15 at 10:36
  • 3
    true || false && false – Ôrel May 1 '15 at 10:36
3

If they had the same precedence and were left-associative, then e.g. the expression

1 || 0 && 2

would be

((1 || 0) && 2) // evaluates to 2

instead of the

(1 || (0 && 2)) // evaluates to 1

that we get from the "usual" precedence rules.


For your structure … || … && … || … (which would be (((… || …) && …) || …) instead of normal ((… || (… && …)) || …)), you'd get different results for values like 0 0 1 0.


Why does the logical AND have slightly higher precedence to the logical OR?

So that the canonical form of boolean expressions, the disjunctive normal form, does not need any parenthesis.

  • I was sure I'd tried that, but clearly not! Thanks. – T.J. Crowder May 1 '15 at 12:30
3
true || false && false

is true

(true || false) && false

is false

true || (false && false)

is true

  • It's also easy to see a difference if you use objects instead of booleans. For instance, {a:1} || {b:2} && {c:3} || {d:4} && {e:5} gives {a:1}, while ({a:1} || {b:2}) && ({c:3} || {d:4}) && {e:5} gives {e:5}. – aroth May 1 '15 at 11:11
  • @aroth: Except that all objects are truthy. But using (say) 1 || 0 && "" would make this clearer, as it's 1 but (1 || 0) && "" is "". – T.J. Crowder May 1 '15 at 12:27
1

Example:

1 || 0 && 0 -> (1 || 0) && 0 -> (1) && 0 -> 0
1 || 0 && 0 -> 1 || (0 && 0) -> 1 || (0) -> 1

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