23

Consider the following example:

struct S {
    a: String,
    b: String,
}

I have a macro which is called like this:

my_macro!(S);

I want to access the field names of the struct in the macro like this:

macro_rules! my_macro {
    ($t:ty) => {{
        let field_names = get_field_names($t);
        // do something with field_names
    }};
}

I'm new to Rust and macros, so maybe I'm missing something obvious.

2
  • One idea was to create a command line interface for the given struct using the macro. I wanted to deconstruct the struct and create appropriate options/flags based on the type of each field. However, while I'm talking about it now, I'm not sure if macros are the best way to do this... Commented May 1, 2015 at 12:04
  • Well, maybe it's also possible to do that using just Generics and Traits. Commented May 1, 2015 at 12:10

4 Answers 4

40

A macro is expanded during parsing, more or less; it has no access to the AST or anything like that—all it has access to is the stuff that you pass to it, which for my_macro!(S) is purely that there should be a type named S.

If you define the struct as part of the macro then you can know about the fields:

macro_rules! my_macro {
    (struct $name:ident {
        $($field_name:ident: $field_type:ty,)*
    }) => {
        struct $name {
            $($field_name: $field_type,)*
        }

        impl $name {
            // This is purely an example—not a good one.
            fn get_field_names() -> Vec<&'static str> {
                vec![$(stringify!($field_name)),*]
            }
        }
    }
}

my_macro! {
    struct S {
        a: String,
        b: String,
    }
}

// S::get_field_names() == vec!["a", "b"]

… but this is, while potentially useful, often going to be a dubious thing to do.

0
5

Here is another possibility that does not require to write a macro (however, the field names will be resolved at run time):

extern crate rustc_serialize;

use rustc_serialize::json::{Encoder, Json};
use rustc_serialize::json::Json::Object;
use rustc_serialize::Encodable;

#[derive(Default, RustcEncodable)]
struct S {
    a: String,
    b: String,
}

fn main() {
    let mut json = "".to_owned();
    {
        let mut encoder = Encoder::new(&mut json);
        S::default().encode(&mut encoder).unwrap();
    }

    let json = Json::from_str(&json).unwrap();
    if let Object(object) = json {
        let field_names: Vec<_> = object.keys().collect();
        println!("{:?}", field_names);
    }
}

(this solution needs the rustc-serialize crate)

The derive(Default) has been added to avoid having to manually create a struct as you wanted (but a struct will still be created).

This solution works by encoding the struct to a String in JSON format and decoding it to a Json. From the Json object, we can extract the field names (if it is an Object variant).

A possibly more efficient method is to write its own encoder:

struct FieldNames {
    names: Vec<String>,
}

impl FieldNames {
    fn new() -> FieldNames {
        FieldNames {
            names: vec![],
        }
    }
}

struct FieldsEncoder<'a> {
    fields: &'a mut FieldNames,
}

impl<'a> FieldsEncoder<'a> {
    fn new(fields: &mut FieldNames) -> FieldsEncoder {
        FieldsEncoder {
            fields: fields,
        }
    }
}

type EncoderError = ();

impl<'a> Encoder for FieldsEncoder<'a> {
    fn emit_struct<F>(&mut self, _name: &str, _len: usize, f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> {
        f(self)
    }

    fn emit_struct_field<F>(&mut self, f_name: &str, _f_idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> {
        self.fields.names.push(f_name.to_owned());
        Ok(())
    }

    type Error = EncoderError;
    fn emit_nil(&mut self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_usize(&mut self, _v: usize) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_u64(&mut self, _v: u64) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_u32(&mut self, _v: u32) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_u16(&mut self, _v: u16) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_u8(&mut self, _v: u8) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_isize(&mut self, _v: isize) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_i64(&mut self, _v: i64) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_i32(&mut self, _v: i32) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_i16(&mut self, _v: i16) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_i8(&mut self, _v: i8) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_bool(&mut self, _v: bool) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_f64(&mut self, _v: f64) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_f32(&mut self, _v: f32) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_char(&mut self, _v: char) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_str(&mut self, _v: &str) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_enum<F>(&mut self, _name: &str, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_enum_variant<F>(&mut self, _v_name: &str, _v_id: usize, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_enum_variant_arg<F>(&mut self, _a_idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_enum_struct_variant<F>(&mut self, _v_name: &str, _v_id: usize, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_enum_struct_variant_field<F>(&mut self, _f_name: &str, _f_idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_tuple<F>(&mut self, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_tuple_arg<F>(&mut self, _idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_tuple_struct<F>(&mut self, _name: &str, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_tuple_struct_arg<F>(&mut self, _f_idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_option<F>(&mut self, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_option_none(&mut self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_option_some<F>(&mut self, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_seq<F>(&mut self, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_seq_elt<F>(&mut self, _idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_map<F>(&mut self, _len: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_map_elt_key<F>(&mut self, _idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
    fn emit_map_elt_val<F>(&mut self, _idx: usize, _f: F) -> Result<(), Self::Error> where F: FnOnce(&mut Self) -> Result<(), Self::Error> { Err(()) }
}

which can be used as such:

fn main() {
    let mut fields = FieldNames::new();
    {
        let mut encoder = FieldsEncoder::new(&mut fields);
        S::default().encode(&mut encoder).unwrap();
    }

    println!("{:?}", fields.names);
}
0
5

I wanted to do the same: access the field names of a struct. But with the added complication that the struct was already using a #[derive()] style macro, which is incompatible with macro_rules! solution. As I expect my use case to be rather common, here's a quick write-down of my solution.

My ultimate goal was to write a CSV header line corresponding to a struct Record with the csv crate, even when no record is written (writing records is usually done via serialize(), but we sometimes filter all records and still want a valid empty CSV file as output). This exact problem has also been formulated in another SO question and that this is not possible with just the csv crate is a known and currently unresolved issue.

My solution to the extra complication with the #[derive()] macro on the struct is to use the #[derive(FieldNamesAsArray)] macro defined by the struct-field-names-as-array crate.

You need to define the dependency in Cargo.toml:

[dependencies]
struct-field-names-as-array = "0.1"

Then you can simply annotate the struct Record in your something.rs module with the respective derive macro and use the resulting constant Record::FIELD_NAMES_AS_ARRAY for header writing:

// csv-specific imports
use csv::WriterBuilder;
use serde::Serialize;

// import for getting the field names array
use struct_field_names_as_array::FieldNamesAsArray;

// Serialize from serde, to write `Record`s systematically
// FieldNamesAsArray to get the field names
#[derive(Serialize,FieldNamesAsArray)]
struct Record {
    field_1: String,
    field_2: u64,
}

// ensure that serializing records does not write a header with
// the `.has_headers(false)`
let mut csv_writer = csv::WriterBuilder::new()
    .has_headers(false)
    .from_path("foo.csv")?;

// Manually write out the header.
csv_writer.write_record(Record::FIELD_NAMES_AS_ARRAY)?;

// `serialize()` records later, if some condition is met.
// But we also have a correct header if this condition is never met.
if some_condition {
    csv_writer.serialize(Recor {
        field_1: "some_string",
        field_2: 71028743,
    })?;
}
0

This procedural macro will return the fields of an annotated struct

use proc_macro::TokenStream;
use quote::quote;
use syn;

#[proc_macro_derive(GetAttributesMacro)]
pub fn get_attributes_derive(input: TokenStream) -> TokenStream {
    // Construct a representation of Rust code as a syntax tree
    // that we can manipulate
    let ast = syn::parse(input).unwrap();

    // Build the trait implementation
    impl_get_attributes(&ast)
}

fn impl_get_attributes(ast: &syn::DeriveInput) -> TokenStream {
    let name = &ast.ident;
    let fields = match ast.data {
        syn::Data::Struct(ref data) => match data.fields {
            syn::Fields::Named(ref fields) => fields.named.iter().map(|f| f.ident.clone().unwrap()),
            _ => unimplemented!(),
        },
        _ => unimplemented!(),
    };

    let gen = quote! {

    impl GetAttributesMacro for #name {
            fn get_attributes(&self) -> Vec<&str> {
             let mut vec = Vec::new();

                #(
                    vec.push(stringify!(#fields));
                )*
            return vec;
            }
        }
    };

    gen.into()
}

example:

#[derive(Default, Debug, Clone, PartialEq, Serialize, Deserialize, GetAttributesMacro)]
#[serde(rename_all = "camelCase")]
pub struct Asset {
    pub id: String,
}
fn main() {
    let d = deployment::Asset {
        id: String::from("test"),
    };

    for i in v {
            println!("{}", i)
    }
}
   Finished dev [unoptimized + debuginfo] target(s) in 0.17s
     Running `target/debug/proc`
id

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