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How do I generate

[(0,), (1,), (2,), (0,1), (0,2), (1,2), (0,1,2)]

programmatically (that is, without writing everything out by hand)? That is, a list of all nonempty subtuples of the tuple (0,1,2).

(Note this is not asking for subsets but subtuples.)

1
  • It is asking for subsets, specifically non-empty ones that are ordered as a subsequence.
    – Shashank
    Commented May 1, 2015 at 19:17

3 Answers 3

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>>> from itertools import combinations
>>> t = (0, 1, 2)
>>> print [subset for r in range(1,4) for subset in itertools.combinations(t,r)]
[(0,), (1,), (2,), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2), (0, 1, 2)]

Itertools is a powerful resource. You should check out the documentation

0
4

You can use the powerset() recipe and remove the empty set:

from itertools import chain, combinations

def powerset(iterable):
    "powerset([1,2,3]) --> () (1,) (2,) (3,) (1,2) (1,3) (2,3) (1,2,3)"
    s = list(iterable)
    return chain.from_iterable(combinations(s, r) for r in range(len(s)+1))

as follows:

In [3]: [ss for ss in powerset([0,1,2]) if ss]
Out[3]: [(0,), (1,), (2,), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2), (0, 1, 2)]
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  • Aside from any details regarding order, I need usually the powerset without the empty set and without the full set - so I use the recipe above but use range(1,len(s)) - not sure it is bulletproof...
    – nate
    Commented Feb 2, 2018 at 22:36
  • 1
    @nate I think this is safe: letting r range between 1 and n-1 inclusive omits the empty set and the full set from the call to combinations.
    – xnx
    Commented Feb 3, 2018 at 9:36
2

What you want is basically powerset but without the empty set. By modifying the recipe from the python itertools page to start with a combinations size of 1:

from itertools import combinations, chain

def almost_powerset(seq):
    return list(chain.from_iterable(combinations(seq, r) 
                for r in range(1, len(seq)+1)))

and then just pass in your sequence

lst = [0, 1, 2]
res = almost_powerset(lst)

This generates all the combinations of size 1, then size 2, etc, up to the total length of your sequence, then uses chain to connect them.

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