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I have

library(ISLR)
attach(Wage)

# Polynomial Regression and Step Functions

fit=lm(wage~poly(age,4),data=Wage)
coef(summary(fit))

fit2=lm(wage~poly(age,4,raw=T),data=Wage)
coef(summary(fit2))

plot(age, wage)
lines(20:350, predict(fit, newdata = data.frame(age=20:350)), lwd=3, col="darkred")
lines(20:350, predict(fit2, newdata = data.frame(age=20:350)), lwd=3, col="darkred")

The prediction lines seem to be the same, however why are the coefficients so different? How do you intepret them in raw=T and raw=F.

I see that the coefficients produced with poly(...,raw=T) match the ones with ~age+I(age^2)+I(age^3)+I(age^4).

If I want to use the coefficients to get the prediction "manually" (without using the predict() function) is there something I should pay attention to? How should I interpret the coefficients of the orthogonal polynomials in poly().

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    Did you read this:inside-r.org/r-doc/stats/poly ? raw means whether using orthogonal polynomials. – Haochen Wu May 2 '15 at 8:08
  • Yes I did. What a probably need is a small explanation regarding orthogonal polynomials in model building – ECII May 2 '15 at 8:09
  • I think it's more about how R store the model internally and it makes little difference when come to prediction, only numerical precision is of concern, but I'm not a statistician and such kind of question may better fit mathematics stack exchange. – Haochen Wu May 2 '15 at 8:15
  • well it effects the coefficients dramatically, so I dont think its much internal – ECII May 2 '15 at 8:16
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    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthogonal_polynomials Wikipedia has a page about it. It's kind of like you are changing the axis system and your coordinate change dramatically but the vector will stay the same. (Probably not the best analogy but again I'm not a mathematician.) – Haochen Wu May 2 '15 at 8:18
65

By default, with raw = FALSE, poly() computes an orthogonal polynomial. It internally sets up the model matrix with the raw coding x, x^2, x^3, ... first and then scales the columns so that each column is orthogonal to the previous ones. This does not change the fitted values but has the advantage that you can see whether a certain order in the polynomial significantly improves the regression over the lower orders.

Consider the simple cars data with response stopping distance and driving speed. Physically, this should have a quadratic relationship but in this (old) dataset the quadratic term is not significant:

m1 <- lm(dist ~ poly(speed, 2), data = cars)
m2 <- lm(dist ~ poly(speed, 2, raw = TRUE), data = cars)

In the orthogonal coding you get the following coefficients in summary(m1):

                Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept)       42.980      2.146  20.026  < 2e-16 ***
poly(speed, 2)1  145.552     15.176   9.591 1.21e-12 ***
poly(speed, 2)2   22.996     15.176   1.515    0.136    

This shows that there is a highly significant linear effect while the second order is not significant. The latter p-value (i.e., the one of the highest order in the polynomial) is the same as in the raw coding:

                            Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)
(Intercept)                  2.47014   14.81716   0.167    0.868
poly(speed, 2, raw = TRUE)1  0.91329    2.03422   0.449    0.656
poly(speed, 2, raw = TRUE)2  0.09996    0.06597   1.515    0.136

but the lower order p-values change dramatically. The reason is that in model m1 the regressors are orthogonal while they are highly correlated in m2:

cor(model.matrix(m1)[, 2], model.matrix(m1)[, 3])
## [1] 4.686464e-17
cor(model.matrix(m2)[, 2], model.matrix(m2)[, 3])
## [1] 0.9794765

Thus, in the raw coding you can only interpret the p-value of speed if speed^2 remains in the model. And as both regressors are highly correlated one of them can be dropped. However, in the orthogonal coding speed^2 only captures the quadratic part that has not been captured by the linear term. And then it becomes clear that the linear part is significant while the quadratic part has no additional significance.

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    Fantastic answer. Thank you very much. Just a small question: How should one interpret the coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial? – ECII May 2 '15 at 8:45
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    I think the exact units are difficult to interpret but this is true in either polynomial, I think. But in the orthogonal case, the quadratic term gives you the deviations from just the linear polynomial; and the cubic term the deviations from just the quadratic polynomial etc. – Achim Zeileis May 2 '15 at 9:04
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    @ECII @ Achim In an answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/31457230/… I've given a function to translate the orthogonal polynomial to "conventional" coefficients of powers. Although it seems to work I don't like that function, it really is ugly :-0, I'd appreciate suggestions for alternative approaches. – user20637 Jul 17 '15 at 11:29
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    @AchimZeileis Since I would have run dist~speed+I(speed^2), which is equivalent to poly(speed,2,raw=T) in your example, I would have concluded that neither speed, nor speed^2 seem statistically significant based on the p-values of .656 or .136. On the other hand, model m1 shows speed is statistically significant, but not speed^2. I'm having trouble understanding this... two contradictory pieces of information. Could you help me grasp the concept better? – Rahul Jan 22 '17 at 18:51
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    @Rahul That's the whole point of the orthogonalization. In the raw coding you can only interpret the p-value of speed of speed^2 remains in the model. And as both regressors are highly correlated one of them can be drooped. However, in the orthogonal coding speed^2 only captures the quadratic part that has not been captured by the linear term. And then it becomes clear that the linear part is significant while the quadratic part has no additional significance. – Achim Zeileis Jan 22 '17 at 20:44
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I believe the way the polynomial regression would be run based on raw=T, is that one would look at the highest power term and assess its significance based on the pvalue for that coefficient.

If found not significant (large pvalue) then the regression would be re-run without that particular non-significant power (ie. the next lower degree) and this would be carried out one step at a time reducing if not significant.

If at any time the higher degree is significant then the process would stop and assert that, that degree is the appropriate one.

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