30

I wanted clone repository from github. It had lot of history, So i wanted clone without any history.

Is it possible to clone git repository without history?

40

You can get a shallow clone using the --depth option with value 1

git clone --depth 1 reponame.git

If you want more commit history, increase the value to meet your needs as required.

  • 1
    Great, got a new skill lol – Kjuly May 2 '15 at 10:51
  • that does not work, you still get history when you wanna mirror it to another repo – PositiveGuy Dec 19 '18 at 0:26
9

After cloned, you can delete the .git directory, then re-init the git to generate a totally new repo.

$ git clone ...
$ cd path/to/repo
$ rm -rf .git
$ git init
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    In fact, this is the only and perfect answer to the question. It is not possible to clone without any history, but you can erase the history afterwards and start anew. Thank you:) – viery365 Apr 30 '18 at 11:08
  • that does not work, because you then are not able to mirror it to a new repo because you've deleted the database and it loses references and can't wire up, so the mirror fails – PositiveGuy Dec 19 '18 at 0:27
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    @PositiveGuy sorry, what do u mean? Maybe let me make it more clear: after having deleted the history by $ rm -rf .git, the cmd $ git init will create a pure new repo history w/o legacy one, that's what the OP expected. However, if u expect to send PR to source repo after deleting the history, then that's not a correct workflow, cause git's PR is based on history (w/o history, the PR will have a mess conflicts), i.e., u need to keep the repo as what it was if you want to send PR. Hope it helps. :) – Kjuly Dec 19 '18 at 7:10
6

Use the --depth option in git clone:

--depth Create a shallow clone with a history truncated to the specified number of revisions.

usage: git clone --depth=1 <remote_repo_url>

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