15

I was wondering if there is any performance difference between running a constructor from within a constructor (aka. constructor delegation) and not.

Please don't interpret this question as me supporting redundancy, like copying long constructors for a performance boost. I understand that in most cases, calling a constructor within a constructor is desirable for many reasons other than performance. (Readability, for example)

As an example, this is a Vector3D class that I've recently created:

public class Vector3D {

    public final int x, y, z;

    public Vector3D() {
        this(0, 0, 0);
    }

    public Vector3D(int x, int y, int z) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}

Will I benefit from not calling this(0, 0, 0) and simply setting the variables myself like this?

public class Vector3D {

    public final int x, y, z;

    public Vector3D() {
        this.x = 0;
        this.y = 0;
        this.z = 0;
    }

    public Vector3D(int x, int y, int z) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
    }
}
11
  • Even if there is a difference, you won't be able to notice it.
    – isnot2bad
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:00
  • 1
    There is no performance impact; you just have an overloaded version...and if so, it would be irrelevant (for this case). You can try and do a benchmark on this by yourself
    – user4695271
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:01
  • All methods called from constructors, should be final (according to PMD)...
    – xerx593
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:09
  • 1
    @xerx593 or private. But a constructor cannot be overriden, it does not apply
    – Dici
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:24
  • @DIci: pmd.sourceforge.net/pmd-4.3.0/rules/… ... and since when/why can't constructors be overwritten? (the "default constructor" can even be overwritten from private to public)
    – xerx593
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

10

You will never benefit from duplicating code. This is premature optimization. A method call costs nothing, unless you perform it very often in a short while. In this case, it is acceptable to inline the code if it is not used in too many places of the system, but that is not your case.

Imagine that one day you add another feature to your class. If you inlined the code, you will have to update two constructors instead of a single one. All the bits of code which logic is related should be related in code (basically calling the same nethods/using the same classes). That's how you build reusable code.

Don't overthink about performance, first think about design, clarity and reusability. The parts of your system that really need to be performant are algorithmic ones, this should not impact the design.

7
  • 1
    I would understand if you have a long constructor and copying it would be redundant, but for a Vector3D? This is a real class, and realistically there's no harm in picking three lines over one. In this case, doing it one way is just as easy as doing it the other. The question would then be: which way do I do it?
    – octopod
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:04
  • 3
    Because code is for humans, and has to be readable. You don't know what happens to your code when it gets compiled, but my guess is that it will compile into separate constructors however you write it. There is a syntax for calling other constructors of the same class, trust the language creators and use it, they must have thought about it.
    – Dici
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:06
  • ..unless "someone" comes and overwrites his int, int, int constructor.
    – xerx593
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:08
  • 1
    @xerx593 Then this "someone" should come up with a good reason and find an alternative. What's the problem with this ? Should we not write methods just because another member of the team will potentially remove it in a refactoring ?
    – Dici
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:12
  • 1
    @assylias I meant that the individual cost of a method is virtually nothing if it is not call very often. The JIT might inline a method called often, but the JIT has its own cost, and what about a method which might be called very often in some burst periods but not always ? Personnaly, I would never rely on the JIT to optimize my code unless I have a deep knowledge of it.
    – Dici
    Commented May 7, 2015 at 22:30
6

Main.java

package pokus1;

public class Main {

    public int m_a;
    public int m_b;

    public Main(int a, int b) {

        m_a = a;
        m_b = b;

    }

    public Main() {
        this(0,0);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Main main = new Main();

    }

}

Javap output (javap -v Main.class) for pokus1.Main():

Do you see the invokespecial instruction on the offset 3? This is the call to pokus1.Main(int a,int b). So fundamentaly yes, it is more effective to not call the second constructor. But there are many optimizations in current JVM implementations, like method inlining, just-in-time compilation etc., so I think you doesn't need to think about it, otherwise you can think about every java call, if it is necessary.

public pokus1.Main();
    flags: ACC_PUBLIC
    Code:
      stack=3, locals=1, args_size=1
         0: aload_0       
         1: iconst_0      
         2: iconst_0      
         3: invokespecial #24                 // Method "<init>":(II)V
         6: return        
      LineNumberTable:
        line 16: 0
        line 17: 6
      LocalVariableTable:
        Start  Length  Slot  Name   Signature
               0       7     0  this   Lpokus1/Main;
5
  • Surprised that this was not inlined ! Is this the Oracle JDK ?
    – Dici
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:15
  • 1
    Dici: it is compiled with Eclipse compiler. But it can be inlined at runtime, so it is ok.
    – Krab
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:17
  • I don't know... this could be done statically so why doing it at runtime ?
    – Dici
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:22
  • 2
    @Dici: because the JVM is very good in that. If you have short time running program, it doesn't matter if you inline few instructions. If your program will run for a long time, JVM will take care of it.
    – Krab
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 12:26
  • @Dici the javac compiler does not inline anything - inlining is performed by the JVM.
    – assylias
    Commented May 7, 2015 at 22:16
5

Generally, there is no difference at all, because the just in time compiler inlines short methods.

Moreover, even if the code was not inlined, the overhead caused by the two branch instructions in machine code is unlikely to materially affect the runtime of the entire program, unless the program spends most of its time working with these vectors.

1
  • I thought that the JIT leaves constructors specifically alone from inline op. No?
    – user4229245
    Commented May 2, 2015 at 15:46

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