93

Possible Duplicate:
IDictionary<string, string> or NameValueCollection

Any reason I should use Dictionary<string,string> instead of NameValueCollection?

(in C# / .NET Framework)

Option 1, using NameValueCollection:

//enter values:
NameValueCollection nvc = new NameValueCollection()
{
  {"key1", "value1"},
  {"key2", "value2"},
  {"key3", "value3"}
};

// retrieve values:
foreach(string key in nvc.AllKeys)
{
  string value = nvc[key];
  // do something
}

Option 2, using Dictionary<string,string>...

//enter values:
Dictionary<string, string> dict = new Dictionary<string, string>()
{
  {"key1", "value1"},
  {"key2", "value2"},
  {"key3", "value3"}
};

// retrieve values:
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> kvp in dict)
{
  string key = kvp.Key;
  string val = kvp.Value;
  // do something
}

For these use cases, is there any advantage to use one versus the other? Any difference in performance, memory use, sort order, etc.?

123

They aren't semantically identical. The NameValueCollection can have duplicate keys while the Dictionary cannot.

Personally if you don't have duplicate keys, then I would stick with the Dictionary. It's more modern, uses IEnumerable<> which makes it easy to mingle with Linq queries. You can even create a Dictionary using the Linq ToDictionary() method.

  • 1
    You can also use .ToLookup(o => [key], o => [value(s)]) if you have duplicate keys, and it should (?) behave like a readonly dictionary. – drzaus Mar 10 '15 at 14:31
  • 6
    NameValueCollection inherits from NameObjectCollectionBase which implements IEnumerable so it is also enumerable and usable with LINQ. – Fred Apr 20 '16 at 14:23
16

NameValueCollection is string typed whereas Dictionary leverages generics to allow type variance. See Benefits of Generics.

  • 1
    NameValueCollection is strongly typed. It's using strings everywhere. No object references at all. – Bryan Legend Oct 29 '15 at 21:24
  • Thanks @LoneCoder, fixed it. – John K Oct 30 '15 at 16:34
10

Dictionary will be much faster. NameValueCollection allows duplicate keys. Which could be bad in certain situations, or desired in other. Dictionary does not allow duplicate keys.

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508.aspx

The Dictionary<(Of <(TKey, TValue>)>) generic class provides a mapping from a set of keys to a set of values. Each addition to the dictionary consists of a value and its associated key. Retrieving a value by using its key is very fast, close to O(1), because the Dictionary<(Of <(TKey, TValue>)>) class is implemented as a hash table.

  • But why do you claim that NameValueCollection is not implimented as a hash table? I see many people claim such, but i've found no documentation or references indicating such. Altho i do recognize that if a NameValueCollection was made for use for QueryStrings, then they shud not use a hash table because the hash table wud be slower for most instances. You claim the Dictionary is faster, but that's only true for large lists. Small lists, like with 10 keys, are normally faster without hash tables. So i ask you to be careful to call anything 'faster' as a blanket statement; it depends. – Shawn Kovac Jan 22 '16 at 16:56
  • @ShawnKovac: That's not me claiming that NVC is not implemented as a hash table. That's a direct quote from MSDN. Feel free to back-check my copy-paste text! :) – code4life Jan 22 '16 at 19:15
  • where does MSDN claim than NVC is not not implemented as a hash table? i can't find that, and i actually found the opposite, altho not stated directly. But MSDN shows the NameValueCollection is inherited from NameObjectCollectionBase and on the NameObjectCollectionBase page, the first sentence under Remarks is "The underlying structure for this class is a hash table." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Shawn Kovac Jan 26 '16 at 0:52
  • 1
    thanks for the link, but i find the exact opposite of what you are claiming in that article. The article you just linked has this exact text: "NameValueCollection actually delegates the hash key lookups to an internal Hashtable, which may contain multiple entries associated with that key." So according to this article, a NVC does use a hashtable lookup for names, with the added feature that it can contain multiple items with the same key. But i don't understand why they don't just use a normal hashtable and combine the values if the key already exists. – Shawn Kovac Jun 22 '16 at 15:40
  • 1
    And this link at Microsoft clearly states that it indeed DOES use a 'hash key lookup', which is what my initial question was. I also understand now that when i wrote 'hash table' you understood me to mean a .NET HashTable which is NOT what i meant. I meant it generically, which could otherwise be expressed as a 'quick binary search' for the key name. And this is indeed what NVC uses. So i think we both agree that that a NVC is not a .NET HashTable but it does use a quick binary search algorithm to find the key quickly (which .NET calls a 'hash key lookup', and i called a 'hashtable'). – Shawn Kovac Jun 30 '16 at 15:15

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