17

I am comparing node.js versus PHP in terms of write performance to MySQL database. I am using Apache Benchmark, linux Mint in virtual machine, newest mysql-server(5.5.43) and driver for MySQL with node.js from here. The code I used is

server.js

var http = require('http');
var mysql = require('mysql');
var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {

var connection = mysql.createConnection({
    host     : 'localhost',
    user     : 'root',
    password : 'root',
    database : 'testDB'
});

connection.connect();
connection.query("INSERT INTO Persons (LastName, FirstName, Address, City) VALUES ('Futterkiste', 'Alfreds', 'Obere Str. 57', 'Berlin')", function(err, rows, fields) {
    if (!err)
        console.log('The solution is: ', rows);
    else
        console.log('Error while performing Query.');
});

connection.end();

res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
res.end('Hello World');
});

server.listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');
console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:1337/');

index.php

$servername = "localhost";
$username = "root";
$password = "root";
$dbname = "testDB";

try {
    $conn = new PDO("mysql:host=$servername;dbname=$dbname", $username, $password);
    // set the PDO error mode to exception
    $conn->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
    $sql = "INSERT INTO Persons (LastName, FirstName, Address, City) VALUES ('Futterkiste', 'Alfreds', 'Obere Str. 57', 'Berlin')";
    // use exec() because no results are returned
    $conn->exec($sql);
    echo "New record created successfully";
    }
catch(PDOException $e)
    {
    echo $sql . "<br>" . $e->getMessage();
    }

$conn = null;
echo "Hello world";
?>

Apache Benchmark to Apache2 server with index.php file

ab -n 1000 -c 100 http://localhost/

PHP MySQL write performance

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   1.328 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      230000 bytes
HTML transferred:       43000 bytes
Requests per second:    752.99 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       132.804 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       1.328 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          169.13 [Kbytes/sec] received

Apache Benchmark to node.js server in server.js file

ab -n 1000 -c 100 http://localhost:1337/

node.js MySQL write performance

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   3.896 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      113000 bytes
HTML transferred:       12000 bytes
Requests per second:    256.68 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       389.585 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       3.896 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          28.33 [Kbytes/sec] received

I was under the impression that node.js outperforms PHP in I/O database operations. So it surprises me that no matter which SQL statement I try (also tried SELECT * FROM Persons) node.js turns out worse.

Not only that but also when cuncurrency level is 100, node logs a ton of 'Error while performing Query.' messages to the console and only ~500 out of 1000 requests get written to the database. Are mysql node drivers just that bad or I am doing something very wrong here? I would really appreciate your help :)

Thank you

5
  • 2
    which test do you run first? node or php? you should reset the DB after each test to have consistent results, or just use 2 different DBs with same schema
    – Nikos M.
    May 3 '15 at 13:19
  • tried reseting DB after each test and the results are the same :( May 3 '15 at 13:30
  • You can't measure things like that. You're running everything on a single machine, including benchmarking program. What you just tested was how well each of those programs handles concurrent connections. Also, the write operation belongs exclusively to MySQL. That's the main authority when it comes to stuffing data to disk. Neither PHP or node have anything to say there. I suggest using better tools for benchmarking, using different machines as well so you don't take up cores or hdd I/O needlessly and run the CLI versions of the program. You just tested http concurrency there essentially.
    – N.B.
    May 3 '15 at 15:34
  • Then why is node.js so bad at cuncurrent MySQL queryes when compared to PHP? I found that node.js is much faster at cuncurrent reads/writes to a file on hard disk, why is this behaviour not seen with MySQL database? May 4 '15 at 7:46
  • 1
    When you write to a file on the disk, you are not forcing the drive to really write the data. OS and the hard drive cache are queueing the write operation and the write occurs at the later stage, when there's more data to be written in a single write operation. When you issue a database update or insert, database forces the disk and OS to avoid this queueing mechanism and to really write the data - this is the D of ACID - durability. This is why NoSQLs appear faster than relational databases - they delay writes. Node works the same way.
    – N.B.
    May 4 '15 at 8:02
30

First of all you didn't finish server.js code. There is a bug with too many connections opened to DB. To fix this I used connectionPool. And second of all Apache use workers to run many copies of same script in parallel.

Now the result for Apache + PHP + MySQL (XAMP) as a reference point:

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   7.476 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      230000 bytes
HTML transferred:       42000 bytes
Requests per second:    133.77 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       747.557 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       7.476 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          30.05 [Kbytes/sec] received

Now to equal the chances I fixed server.js

var http = require('http');
var mysql = require('mysql');
var connection = mysql.createPool({
    connectionLimit: 10,
    host     : 'localhost',
    user     : 'test',
    password : 'test',
    database : 'testDB'
});
var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    connection.query("INSERT INTO Persons (LastName, FirstName, Address, City) VALUES ('Futterkiste', 'Alfreds', 'Obere Str. 57', 'Berlin')", function(err, rows, fields) {
        if (!err)
            console.log('The solution is: ', rows);
        else {
            console.log('Error while performing Query.');
        }
        res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
        res.end('Hello World');
    });
});
server.listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');
server.on('close', function() {
    connection.end();
})
console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:1337/');

And results of Node + MySQL:

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   7.289 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      112000 bytes
HTML transferred:       11000 bytes
Requests per second:    137.19 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       728.899 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       7.289 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          15.01 [Kbytes/sec] received

As you can see the results are very close. But this is one node process against 11 Apache workers. What happens if I add clusters to the equation? Here is the modified code:

var http = require('http');
var mysql = require('mysql');
var cluster = require('cluster');

if (cluster.isMaster) {
    cluster.fork();
    cluster.fork();
    cluster.fork();
    cluster.fork();
} else {
    var connection = mysql.createPool({
        connectionLimit: 10,
        host     : 'localhost',
        user     : 'test',
        password : 'test',
        database : 'testDB'
    });
    var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
        connection.query("INSERT INTO Persons (LastName, FirstName, Address, City) VALUES ('Futterkiste', 'Alfreds', 'Obere Str. 57', 'Berlin')", function(err, rows, fields) {
            if (!err)
                console.log('The solution is: ', rows);
            else {
                console.log('Error while performing Query.');
            }
            res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
            res.end('Hello World');
        });
    });

    server.listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');
    server.on('close', function() {
        connection.end();
    })
    console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:1337/ worker:' + cluster.worker.id);
}

Four node workers results:

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   2.782 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      112000 bytes
HTML transferred:       11000 bytes
Requests per second:    359.48 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       278.179 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       2.782 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          39.32 [Kbytes/sec] received

For curiosity I add results for node with 10 workers:

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   2.647 seconds
Complete requests:      1000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      112000 bytes
HTML transferred:       11000 bytes
Requests per second:    377.84 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       264.665 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       2.647 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          41.33 [Kbytes/sec] received

My laptop is Core2Duo T6600, Ubuntu 14.04.3, php 5.5.9, node 0.10.37, mysql 5.5.44

3
  • I'm on a FX 6300, using just one node process and I am getting: ` Concurrency Level: 100 Time taken for tests: 1.045 seconds Complete requests: 1000 Failed requests: 0 Total transferred: 112000 bytes HTML transferred: 11000 bytes Requests per second: 956.94 [#/sec] (mean) Time per request: 104.500 [ms] (mean) Time per request: 1.045 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests Transfer rate: 104.66 [Kbytes/sec] received ` my innodb is innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit=0 innodb_thread_concurrency=8 innodb_log_buffer_size = 32MB Feb 7 '16 at 21:12
  • With cluster, I am getting: Requests per second: 1392.73 [#/sec] (mean) Time per request: 71.801 [ms] (mean) Time per request: 0.718 [ms] (mean, across all Transfer rate: 152.33 [Kbytes/sec] received Holy shit! :) Feb 7 '16 at 21:16
  • I don't see where the PHP reference was taken from in this answer? The performance result from PHP that I see above is 752 requests per second. Yet this answer shows one that is 133 requests per second. Why the disparity? did I miss something?
    – Derrek
    Oct 31 '16 at 14:18

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