4

I'm adding a UI to some code I wrote for a messenger, some while ago. It seems to be going OK, apart from when I try to display new messages from a different thread.

The program flows thusly:

  1. The MainWindow gets created and instantiated. The constructor for MainWindow:

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    
        _messageContainer = (StackPanel)FindName("Messages");
        _messageStatus = (StatusBarItem)FindName("MessageStatus");
        _messageCountElement = (StatusBarItem)FindName("MessageCount");
        _messageBox = (TextBox)FindName("MessageToSend");
        _sendButton = (Button)FindName("SendMessage");
    
        _ipAddress = GetIPAddress();
        try
        {
            Client.Initialize(_ipAddress, this);
            _sendButton.IsEnabled = true;
            _messageBox.IsEnabled = true;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            DisplayMessage("Could not connect to " + _ipAddress.ToString() + ". The error given was '" + e.Message + "'.", "Server", Colors.Red);
        }
    }
    
  2. The sending client (Client class) is initialized using Client.Initialize from the MainWindow constructor. Client.Initialize:

    public static void Initialize(IPEndPoint endPoint, MainWindow window)
    {
        windowInstance = window;
        client = new TcpClient();
        client.ReceiveTimeout = 500;
        listenerThread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(Receiver.Start));
        listenerThread.Start((object)new StartupData(endPoint, windowInstance));
        client.Connect(endPoint);
    }
    
  3. The listener thread is started from Client.Initialize. The listener thread's Start method is long and complicated, but works fine. It boils down to calling another method, ProcessMessage to process what it receives. ProcessMessage:

    public static void ProcessMessage(string response)
    {
        response = response.Trim();
    
        MessageBox.Show(response);
    
        if (response.StartsWith("[Message]"))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Message");
            response = response.Substring(9);
    
            int openIndex = response.IndexOf("<");
            int closeIndex = response.IndexOf(">");
    
            if (openIndex < 0 || closeIndex < 0 || closeIndex < openIndex)
            {
                throw new FormatException("Could not find ID tag in message");
            }
    
            int diff = closeIndex - openIndex;
            int id = Int32.Parse(response.Substring(openIndex + 1, diff - 1));
            if (id != Client.GetClientId())
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Them");
                string message = response.Substring(closeIndex + 1);
                window.DisplayMessage(message, "Them", Colors.Yellow);
            }
            else
            {
                MessageBox.Show("You");
                string message = response.Substring(closeIndex + 1);
                window.DisplayMessage(message, "You", Colors.Blue);
            }
        }
        else if (response.Length == 5 && response.StartsWith("[") && response.EndsWith("]"))
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Response code");
            Client.HandleResponse(ResponseCodes.GetResponse(response));
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                Int32.Parse(response);
                MessageBox.Show("ID");
                Client.SetClientId(Int32.Parse(response));
                return;
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                window.DisplayMessage(response, "Server", Colors.Red);
            }
        }
    }
    
  4. The DisplayMessage method is called. DisplayMessage:

    public void DisplayMessage(string message, string name, Color nameColor)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Called");
    
        UpdateMessageStatus(ProcessingStatus.Processing);
    
        Grid fullMessage = new Grid();
        fullMessage.ColumnDefinitions.Add(new ColumnDefinition { Width = new GridLength(50.00) });
        fullMessage.ColumnDefinitions.Add(new ColumnDefinition { Width = new GridLength(600.00) });
    
        Label nameLabel = new Label
        {
            Content = string.Format("[{0}]", name),
            Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(nameColor)
        };
        Grid.SetColumn(nameLabel, 0);
    
        TextBlock textLabel = new TextBlock
        {
            Text = message,
            TextWrapping = TextWrapping.Wrap,
            Margin = new Thickness(0, 5, 0, 5)
        };
        Grid.SetColumn(textLabel, 1);
    
        fullMessage.Children.Add(nameLabel);
        fullMessage.Children.Add(textLabel);
    
        UpdateMessageStatus(ProcessingStatus.Displaying);
        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(delegate()
        {
            _messageContainer.Children.Add(fullMessage);
        }));        
    
        _messageCount += 1;
        UpdateMessageCount();
        UpdateMessageStatus(ProcessingStatus.Ready);
    }
    

Here is the problem. When I call window.DisplayMessage from the listener thread, literally nothing happens. Not even an exception - but importantly, the message Grid doesn't get created.

What's up with this? I added Dispatcher.BeginInvoke on the advice of another SO question to make sure the thread ownership wasn't a problem, though the same thing happened before this.

(note: all the MessageBoxes are just for debugging. Interestingly, the MessageBox at the top of DisplayMessage does show when called from the listener thread.)

  • 1
    Are you sure you're actually on the UI thread with that call to BeginInvoke? Try Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke and see if that yields different results. – Chris May 3 '15 at 18:16
2

I do suspect this is an issue of cross-thread UI element invokation. Since you are creating your new UI element (fullMessage and its children) on a different thread.

If your window instance is a WPF UserControl or a WPF Window you can use it's synchronization context to perform the cross-thread marshaling.

  • Capture its synchronization context in your MainWindow constructor

    _syncContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;
  • Add a method that uses the captured context, to marshal to the correct dispatcher.

    public void InvokeDisplayMessage(string message, string name, Color nameColor)
    {
        // In the already started spirit of message box debugging ;-)
        MessageBox.Show("InvokeDisplayMessage Called");
        this._syncContext.Post(
            new SendOrPostCallback(x => DisplayMessage(message, name, nameColor)), 
            null);
    }
    
  • And finally change all of the window.DisplayMessage calls in your ProcessMessage to window.InvokeDisplayMessage.

  • Works a treat :) – ArtOfCode May 3 '15 at 18:35
  • @ArtOfCode, A better way is possible, I will update my answer to reflect that. – Alex May 3 '15 at 18:36

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