96

I have a Mocha test file that looks like this:

var expect = require('chai').expect
var muting = require('../muting')

describe('muting', function () {
  describe('init()', function () {
    it('should inject an object into twitter', function () {
      var twitter = 'twitter'
      muting.init(twitter)
      expect(muting.twitter).to.equal(twitter)
    })
  })
})

When I run mocha from the CLI, it runs the test successfully.

When I run standard (the executable for JavaScript Standard Style) I get errors on Mocha's framework functions like so:

standard: Use JavaScript Standard Style (https://github.com/feross/standard)   
c:\..\test\index.js:5:0: 'describe' is not defined.  
c:\..\test\index.js:6:2: 'describe' is not defined.  
c:\..\test\index.js:7:4: 'it' is not defined.

What's the cleanest way to make Standard not complain about these functions?

0
150

Actually, you don't need to list every single global variable in your package.json

You can specify environments instead like this:

"standard": {
  "env": [ "mocha" ]
}

Source: Official ESLint configuration docs.

5
  • 2
    Good solution. Doesn't that mean I can call it in regular non-test code and it will pass linting? In other words. Can it be restricted only to test classes? – Ashley Dec 4 '16 at 17:44
  • 3
    Yeah, that's the problem... package.json settings are 'global' for linter. You can bypass it by providing different CLI arguments for different files: something like standard --env mocha test/**/js for lint-tests (not tested), but IRL i never had a need to tweak settings like this. – Krzysztof Kaczor Dec 4 '16 at 19:48
  • 4
    If using jest, you also can: "standard": { "env": [ "jest" ]} – palafox_e Jul 3 '18 at 22:30
  • To add to the comment by @palafox_e you can find out which values are available by navigating to: github.com/sindresorhus/globals/blob/master/globals.json – Wil Moore III Jul 9 '18 at 22:26
  • I'm using jest but I don't know why only works for mocha and not jest! – Developerium Jan 11 '20 at 6:30
164

I prefer to edit my .eslintrc and add mocha to env section:

...
"env": {
  "commonjs": true,
  "node": true,
  "mocha": true
},
...

this way my package.json file is kept clean, also vscode plugin for eslint understands it better

2
  • 9
    Yes, this should be the approved answer. – Raymond Wachaga Jun 26 '19 at 12:17
  • 5
    I also second the fact that this should be the approved answer. – Ezrqn Kemboi Mar 11 '20 at 6:55
62

while eslint's comment configuration works great for a single file, I prefer to use standard's package.json globals configuration to do this for my projects. E.g.

{
  "name": "my-package",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "standard": {
    "globals": [
      "describe",
      "context",
      "before",
      "beforeEach",
      "after",
      "afterEach",
      "it",
      "expect"
    ]
  }
}
0
53

for eslint use this line on the beginning of test_file.js

/* eslint-env mocha */
4
  • 3
    I prefer this solution! – Michael Ozeryansky Nov 29 '18 at 10:31
  • 6
    That's not a solution if you have to add it for every test file – Peadar Jul 25 '19 at 8:38
  • @Peadar Creating multiple .eslintrc.json is also not really beautiful, just because you do not want to add one line to the test. On the other hand creating another .eslintrc.json makes sense if you need more than that config for mocha, for example an extra plugin or so. – Ini Feb 2 at 18:39
  • Only solution that worked so far – Julien Reszka Feb 23 at 17:10
39

You can use the same solution as for web workers

/* global describe it */
var expect = require('chai').expect
var muting = require('../muting')

describe('muting', function () {
  describe('init()', function () {
    it('should inject an object into twitter', function () {
     var twitter = 'twitter'
     muting.init(twitter)
     expect(muting.twitter).to.equal(twitter)
    })
  })
})
2

As pointed out by Nick Tomlin you just need to declare globals.

I use to put it in the command line, since I have different globals for tests as for sources or different parts of the project.

For tests we should use

standard --global describe --global it test/

elsewhere in my project I want to lint code that uses jQuery so I use

standard --global $ src/client/

Bonus tip

If you are using vim with Syntastic you maybe want to add to your .vimrc

let b:syntastic_checkers = ['standard']
let g:syntastic_javascript_standard_args = "--global $ --global it --global describe"

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