36

How do I make it so the code runs only if there was no exception thrown?

With finally code runs whether there was an exception or not.

try {
   //do something
} catch (Exception e) {}
//do something only if nothing was thrown
1
  • 5
    Why not put it in the try block below the exception throwing call?
    – kuporific
    May 3, 2015 at 21:12

7 Answers 7

63

Here are two ways:

try {
    somethingThatMayThrowAnException();
    somethingElseAfterwards();
} catch (...) {
    ...
}

Or if you want your second block of code to be outside the try block:

boolean success = false;
try {
    somethingThatMayThrowAnException();
    success = true;
} catch (...) {
    ...
}
if (success) {
    somethingElseAfterwards();
}

You could also put the if statement in a finally block, but there is not enough information in your question to tell if that would be preferable or not.

2
  • The first way is really the natural way to do. The second that introduces a local variable and a reading indirection brings no advantage here.
    – davidxxx
    Mar 30, 2018 at 11:31
  • 6
    @davidxxx "brings no advantage" -- It depends on the use case. There are situations where you might want the second task to be executed outside the try block instead of inside. You might not want executions from the second block to be handled the same way as exceptions in the first block.
    – khelwood
    Jul 10, 2018 at 8:11
21
try {
    doSomething();
    doSomething2();
} catch (Exception e) {
    doSomething3();
}

In this example, doSomething2() will only be executed if no exception is thrown by doSomething().

If an exception is thrown by doSomething(), doSomething2(); will be skipped and execution will jump to doSomething3();

Also note, doSomething3() will be executed if there is an exception thrown by doSomething2();

If no exception is thrown, doSomething3(); will not be executed.

5
  • 7
    But what if doSomething2 throws an exception? I don't want it to be catched.
    – spalac24
    Dec 11, 2015 at 17:06
  • So you'd want doSomething2() to stay in that order, but if it throws an exception it won't get caught and execute doSomething3()? You could place doSomething2() in a try catch block of its own (nested try block), and your catch could do nothing like catch (Exception e) {}.
    – Rani Kheir
    Apr 10, 2016 at 9:10
  • 1
    I want to initialize some final value at doSomething(), and if exception is thrown, I then want the final value to hold some fall-back value. How to do that then? Apr 17, 2016 at 20:49
  • If you want to change the value, it isn't final.
    – ThePerson
    Apr 20, 2016 at 22:00
  • try { doSomething1(); doSomething2(); doSomething3(); } catch (Exception e) { doSomething4(); } @ThePerson I want to do someting like doSomething1,2,3 execute only file all three have no exception how can I achive that?
    – pavitran
    Jan 8, 2017 at 15:15
5

Just put the code in the try block. If an exception is thrown, it will skip to the catch block. If no exception is thrown, the code will just run.

try {
    someMethodThatMayThrowException();
    codeThatShouldBeRunIfNoExceptionThrown();
} catch (Exception e) {...}
2
  • 3
    Problem with this becomes: If SomeException is very general – if it could be thrown down the line by codeThatShouldBeRunIfNoExceptionThrown, or if that method changes to throw that exception in the future – then your catch block will (silently) no longer handle just the original exception.
    – T_T
    Jun 16, 2015 at 19:39
  • @pathfinderelite You answer is fine (+1). I updated by focusing on the original requirement.
    – davidxxx
    Mar 30, 2018 at 11:34
3

An enhancement to the proposed

try {
    somethingThatMayThrowAnException();
    somethingElseAfterwards();
} catch (...) {
    ...
}

from the accepted answer. What you should do is:

void foo() {
  try {
    doStuff();
  } catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

The above feels like overkill to someone who hasn't been exposed to "clean code thinking".

But the point here: you do not want to mix different abstractions within one method. In other words: you don't have one try block, and more code following behind that within the same method.

You make sure that each and any method contains a straight forward path - you avoid anything that complicates your reading flow. As soon as you get used to writing and reading such kind of code you will find that it takes you dramatically less time to understand your code.

2
  • Best part of the accepted answer (first part and not the second :)) with a bonus ! :)
    – davidxxx
    Mar 30, 2018 at 11:36
  • @davidxxx Thanks. Always a pleasure hearing from you ;-)
    – GhostCat
    Mar 30, 2018 at 12:26
1

Exceptions for flow control is kind of a bad practice. If you insist, use a boolean variable.

boolean thrown = false;

try {
   //do something
} catch (Exception e) {
   thrown = true;
}

//do something only if nothing was thrown

if (!thrown) { 
    // do stuff
}
0

I was trying to solve this exact problem when I came across this question, and the answers here helped me think it through and realize, at least in my particular case, this was the wrong question I should have been asking.

I wanted to create this method because I was already doing it in main() and wanted to do it elsewhere for portability. So I copied a block of code that contained a try/catch block. However, it turns out, I don't want to copy the catch block at all, because if the creation of the Connection failed, I just wanted to fail completely.

It seems obvious now, but I never wanted to actually catch the exception in the first place. That code was only there because I copy and pasted it. So if you find yourself asking this question because you're in a try block and you might not generate a value, then consider if you just wanted to fail completely and not return anything that way this extra code is unnecessary.

0

In my opinion the cleanest way to solve this, if you don't need the function to anything extra if an exception was raised, is return.

try  {
    doSomthing();
}
catch (Exception e) {
    handleException();
    return;
}

onlyIfSuccess();

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.