To implement a status bar like below:

[==========                ]  45%
[================          ]  60%
[==========================] 100%

I want to this to be printed out to stdout, and keep refreshing it, not print to another line. How to do this?

12 Answers 12

up vote 94 down vote accepted

There's a Python module that you can get from PyPI called progressbar that implements such functionality. If you don't mind adding a dependency, it's a good solution. Otherwise, go with one of the other answers.

A simple example of how to use it:

import progressbar
from time import sleep
bar = progressbar.ProgressBar(maxval=20, \
    widgets=[progressbar.Bar('=', '[', ']'), ' ', progressbar.Percentage()])
bar.start()
for i in xrange(20):
    bar.update(i+1)
    sleep(0.1)
bar.finish()

To install it, you can use easy_install progressbar, or pip install progressbar if you prefer pip.

  • 3
    Or maybe a classier alternative: pypi.python.org/pypi/fish – Ian Bicking Jun 9 '10 at 4:19
  • 6
    Perhaps this example needs something like bar.start()? – Jim Raynor Mar 31 '15 at 22:26
  • 2
    Does't work on my machine— needed to add bar.start() – Zach Oct 7 '15 at 21:31
  • 4
    tqdm supports Python 3 natively. – gaborous Dec 1 '15 at 21:57
  • 2
    Installation: sudo -H pip install progressbar2. – Martin Thoma Aug 9 '17 at 7:20

The '\r' character (carriage return) resets the cursor to the beginning of the line and allows you to write over what was previously on the line.

from time import sleep
import sys

for i in range(21):
    sys.stdout.write('\r')
    # the exact output you're looking for:
    sys.stdout.write("[%-20s] %d%%" % ('='*i, 5*i))
    sys.stdout.flush()
    sleep(0.25)

I'm not 100% sure if this is completely portable across all systems, but it works on Linux and OSX at the least.

  • 7
    it works on windows too. – Adrien Plisson Jun 9 '10 at 5:50
  • Very nice, sir. – Gyan Veda Sep 10 '14 at 18:30
  • 3
    This is better than the marked answer, because it works with Python 3, too. – Gerhard Hagerer Jun 2 '16 at 9:32
  • any idea why I get strange characters at the end of a line at times, even if i null-terminate the string that is being written? – reservoirman Feb 20 '17 at 20:19
  • 3
    As written, the code does not make it clear how to adapt this to whatever size you are iterating over (not 21). I would let n=21, replace range(21) with range(n), then add j = (i + 1) / n inside the loop, and replace the write statement with this slight modification: sys.stdout.write("[%-20s] %d%%" % ('='*int(20*j), 100*j)). Now the only change you need to make is to n=21 before the loop (more likely n=len(iterable)), then enumerate over the iterable object. I recommended this edit but it was rejected; apparently functionality "deviates from the original intent of the post". – Steven C. Howell Oct 17 '17 at 20:55

I found useful library tqdm (https://github.com/tqdm/tqdm/, previously: https://github.com/noamraph/tqdm). It automatically estimates time of completion and can be used as iterator.

Usage:

import tqdm
import time

for i in tqdm.tqdm(range(1000)):
    time.sleep(0.01)
    # or other long operations

Results in:

|####------| 450/1000  45% [elapsed: 00:04 left: 00:05, 99.15 iters/sec]

tqdm can wrap any iterable.

  • 3
    The tqdm project is now maintained here by a new team of developpers. – gaborous Dec 1 '15 at 21:58
  • waw, this tqdm is just amazing, and so easy to use :) . – Sidahmed Feb 28 '16 at 21:44
  • 3
    this is easily the most simple solution – kd88 Dec 26 '16 at 16:21
  • it's come bundled with the Anaconda distrib too ! (as for python 3.5 and above at least) – Jacquot Feb 4 at 13:20

You can use \r (carriage return). Demo:

import sys
total = 10000000
point = total / 100
increment = total / 20
for i in xrange(total):
    if(i % (5 * point) == 0):
        sys.stdout.write("\r[" + "=" * (i / increment) +  " " * ((total - i)/ increment) + "]" +  str(i / point) + "%")
        sys.stdout.flush()
  • Try total as 10, then you get error message ZeroDivisionError: long division or modulo by zero – unseen_rider Oct 15 '17 at 15:27

Here you can use following code as a function:

def drawProgressBar(percent, barLen = 20):
    sys.stdout.write("\r")
    progress = ""
    for i in range(barLen):
        if i < int(barLen * percent):
            progress += "="
        else:
            progress += " "
    sys.stdout.write("[ %s ] %.2f%%" % (progress, percent * 100))
    sys.stdout.flush()
  • For me the first line does not get amended by the cursor - only the second line does. Hence multiple lines obtained for progress bar, and one for eg ] percent * 100 % – unseen_rider Oct 15 '17 at 16:04

based on the above answers and other similar questions about CLI progress bar, I think I got a general common answer to all of them. Check it at https://stackoverflow.com/a/15860757/2254146

Here is a copy of the function, but modified to fit your style:

import time, sys

# update_progress() : Displays or updates a console progress bar
## Accepts a float between 0 and 1. Any int will be converted to a float.
## A value under 0 represents a 'halt'.
## A value at 1 or bigger represents 100%
def update_progress(progress):
    barLength = 20 # Modify this to change the length of the progress bar
    status = ""
    if isinstance(progress, int):
        progress = float(progress)
    if not isinstance(progress, float):
        progress = 0
        status = "error: progress var must be float\r\n"
    if progress < 0:
        progress = 0
        status = "Halt...\r\n"
    if progress >= 1:
        progress = 1
        status = "Done...\r\n"
    block = int(round(barLength*progress))
    text = "\rPercent: [{0}] {1}% {2}".format( "="*block + " "*(barLength-block), progress*100, status)
    sys.stdout.write(text)
    sys.stdout.flush()

Looks like

Percent: [====================] 99.0%

  • The progress bar doesn't appear for me – unseen_rider Oct 15 '17 at 16:23

I came upon this thread today and after having tried out this solution from Mark Rushakoff

from time import sleep
import sys

for i in range(21):
sys.stdout.write('\r')
# the exact output you're looking for:
sys.stdout.write("[%-20s] %d%%" % ('='*i, 5*i))
sys.stdout.flush()
sleep(0.25)

I can say that this works fine on W7-64 with python 3.4.3 64-bit but only in the native console. However when using the built-in console of spyder 3.0.0dev, the line breaks are still/again present. As this took me some time to figure out, I'd like to report this observation here.

Building on some of the answers here and elsewhere, I've written this simple function which displays a progress bar and elapsed/estimated remaining time. Should work on most unix-based machines.

import time
import sys

percent = 50.0
start = time.time()
draw_progress_bar(percent, start)


def draw_progress_bar(percent, start, barLen=20):
sys.stdout.write("\r")
progress = ""
for i in range(barLen):
    if i < int(barLen * percent):
        progress += "="
    else:
        progress += " "

elapsedTime = time.time() - start;
estimatedRemaining = int(elapsedTime * (1.0/percent) - elapsedTime)

if (percent == 1.0):
    sys.stdout.write("[ %s ] %.1f%% Elapsed: %im %02is ETA: Done!\n" % 
        (progress, percent * 100, int(elapsedTime)/60, int(elapsedTime)%60))
    sys.stdout.flush()
    return
else:
    sys.stdout.write("[ %s ] %.1f%% Elapsed: %im %02is ETA: %im%02is " % 
        (progress, percent * 100, int(elapsedTime)/60, int(elapsedTime)%60,
         estimatedRemaining/60, estimatedRemaining%60))
    sys.stdout.flush()
    return

This is quite a simple approach can be used with any loop.

#!/usr/bin/python
for i in range(100001):
    s =  ((i/5000)*'#')+str(i)+(' %')
    print ('\r'+s),
  • What does the '#' do? – unseen_rider Oct 15 '17 at 14:58
  • @unseen_rider Here '#' is just a symbol that will be repeated as loop iteration increases. – NILESH KUMAR Oct 21 '17 at 17:05

If you are developing a command line interface, I suggest you to take a look at click which is very nice:

import click
import time

for filename in range(3):
    with click.progressbar(range(100), fill_char='=', empty_char=' ') as bar:
        for user in bar:
            time.sleep(0.01)

Here the output you get:

$ python test.py
  [====================================]  100%
  [====================================]  100%
  [=========                           ]   27%

Try PyProg. PyProg is an open-source library for Python to create super customizable progress indicators & bars.

It is currently at version 1.0.2; it is hosted on Github and available on PyPI (Links down below). It is compatible with Python 3 & 2 and it can also be used with Qt Console.

It is really easy to use. The following code:

import pyprog
from time import sleep

# Create Object
prog = pyprog.ProgressBar(" ", " ", total=34, bar_length=26, complete_symbol="=", not_complete_symbol=" ", wrap_bar_prefix=" [", wrap_bar_suffix="] ", progress_explain="", progress_loc=pyprog.ProgressBar.PROGRESS_LOC_END)
# Update Progress Bar
prog.update()

for i in range(34):
    # Do something
    sleep(0.1)
    # Set current status
    prog.set_stat(i + 1)
    # Update Progress Bar again
    prog.update()

# Make the Progress Bar final
prog.end()

will produce exactly what you want (even the bar length!):

[===========               ] 45%
[===============           ] 60%
[==========================] 100%

For more options to customize the progress bar, go to the Github page of this website.

I actually made PyProg because I needed a simple but super customizable progress bar library. You can easily install it with: pip install pyprog.

PyProg Github: https://github.com/Bill13579/pyprog
PyPI: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pyprog/

Easiest is still

import sys
total_records = 1000
for i in range (total_records):
    sys.stdout.write('\rUpdated record: ' + str(i) + ' of ' + str(total_records))
    sys.stdout.flush()

Key is to convert the integer type to string.

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