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Assume for a moment I have a file in a repository called LICENSE.txt. The contents looks as follows:

Copyright 2014 MyCompany. All Rights Reserved.

Since its 2015 I changed the year so its 2015:

Copyright 2015 MyCompany. All Rights Reserved.

And then staged the file

git add LICENSE.txt

Being a tad distracted, I made another change to LICENSE.txt to reflect that another organization shares in the copyright.

Copyright 2015 MyCompany and Affiliates. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright 2015 Other Company. All Rights Reserved.

I'm able to see the difference between my working copy and staged copy by running

git diff 

And I'm able to see the difference between the staged copy and committed copy by running

git diff --cached

How do I compare the committed copy (the one without the year change) with working copy (the one with the additional copyright)?

This is purely an example. There are cases much more complex where I had the need to compare what I have staged with changes I subsequently made to the file. Comparing the contents of the working copy and the staged copy will determine whether I should replaced the staged copy or not.

I'm running git 1.9.5 on Windows Server 2012 R2.

  • git diff does not do what you claim, see the accepted answer. Can you edit your post so that future readers are not mis-lead? – Matthieu Moy May 4 '15 at 6:17
  • I made the change. The confusion stems from the fact that when you have not staged any changed, but made a change to your working copy, git diff will show the difference between the working copy and the committed copy. – bloudraak May 4 '15 at 6:22
  • When you have not staged any changes, git diff behaves the same as when you have staged changes. But both diffs are equal. – Matthieu Moy May 4 '15 at 6:26
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How do I compare the staged copy (the one with the year change) with working copy.
[...] I had the need to compare what I have staged with changes I subsequently made to the file

That would still be git diff.

(edit by OP: How do I compare the committed copy (the one with the year change) with working copy

Then it would be git diff HEAD.)

http://images.abizern.org.s3.amazonaws.com/365git/Feb11/Git%20Diff%202.png

(365git: Getting a diff between the working tree and other commits)

If you are looking for something different from git diff and diff --cached, that leaves you with:

git diff HEAD

That is: the difference between the version already committed and the working tree.

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  • 2
    You covered all the scenarios I was looking for with a very clear illustration too. Thanks for taking the time. – bloudraak May 4 '15 at 6:03
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    It should be noted that if you haven't staged any changes, git diff will show the difference between the committed copy and working copy. – bloudraak May 4 '15 at 6:21
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    @bloudraak true: HEAD and index would be identical before the first git add. – VonC May 4 '15 at 6:31
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  • git diff - Compare working area to index.
  • git diff --staged - Compare stage area to repository.
  • git diff HEAD - Compare working area to repository

To illustrate that, I changed a file with “Name Staged” text and then I added it (git add .). After that, I changed the file again, now I replaced the text to “Name Working Area” and then I run the following commands:

enter image description here

Now, you can see clearly how it works. Pretty cool, right?

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