59

I am trying to convert List<CompletableFuture<X>> to CompletableFuture<List<T>>. This is quite useful as when you have many asynchronous tasks and you need to get results of all of them.

If any of them fails then the final future fails. This is how I have implemented:

  public static <T> CompletableFuture<List<T>> sequence2(List<CompletableFuture<T>> com, ExecutorService exec) {
        if(com.isEmpty()){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
        Stream<? extends CompletableFuture<T>> stream = com.stream();
        CompletableFuture<List<T>> init = CompletableFuture.completedFuture(new ArrayList<T>());
        return stream.reduce(init, (ls, fut) -> ls.thenComposeAsync(x -> fut.thenApplyAsync(y -> {
            x.add(y);
            return x;
        },exec),exec), (a, b) -> a.thenCombineAsync(b,(ls1,ls2)-> {
            ls1.addAll(ls2);
            return ls1;
        },exec));
    }

To run it:

ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
        Stream<CompletableFuture<Integer>> que = IntStream.range(0,100000).boxed().map(x -> CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(() -> {
            try {
                Thread.sleep((long) (Math.random() * 10));
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            return x;
        }, executorService));
CompletableFuture<List<Integer>> sequence = sequence2(que.collect(Collectors.toList()), executorService);

If any of them fails then it fails. It gives output as expected even if there are a million futures. The problem I have is: Say if there are more than 5000 futures and if any of them fails, I get a StackOverflowError:

Exception in thread "pool-1-thread-2611" java.lang.StackOverflowError at java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture.internalComplete(CompletableFuture.java:210) at java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture$ThenCompose.run(CompletableFuture.java:1487) at java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture.postComplete(CompletableFuture.java:193) at java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture.internalComplete(CompletableFuture.java:210) at java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture$ThenCompose.run(CompletableFuture.java:1487)

What am I doing it wrong?

Note: The above returned future fails right when any of the future fails. The accepted answer should also take this point.

  • 1
    If I were you I'd implement a Collector instead... – fge May 4 '15 at 8:13
  • @fge That is actually a very good suggestion. I am coming from scala world where we have a similar thing. Collector might be a better fit here. But then the implementation i suppose might be similar. – Jatin May 4 '15 at 8:19
74

Use CompletableFuture.allOf(...):

static<T> CompletableFuture<List<T>> sequence(List<CompletableFuture<T>> com) {
    return CompletableFuture.allOf(com.toArray(new CompletableFuture<?>[com.size()]))
            .thenApply(v -> com.stream()
                .map(CompletableFuture::join)
                .collect(toList())
            );
}

A few comments on your implementation:

Your use of .thenComposeAsync, .thenApplyAsync and .thenCombineAsync is likely not doing what you expect. These ...Async methods run the function supplied to them in a separate thread. So, in your case, you are causing the addition of the new item to the list to run in the supplied executor. There is no need to stuff light-weight operations into a cached thread executor. Do not use thenXXXXAsync methods without a good reason.

Additionally, reduce should not be used to accumulate into mutable containers. Even though it might work correctly when the stream is sequential, it will fail if the stream were to be made parallel. To perform mutable reduction, use .collect instead.

If you want to complete the entire computation exceptionally immediately after the first failure, do the following in your sequence method:

CompletableFuture<List<T>> result = CompletableFuture.allOf(com.toArray(new CompletableFuture<?>[com.size()]))
        .thenApply(v -> com.stream()
                .map(CompletableFuture::join)
                .collect(toList())
        );

com.forEach(f -> f.whenComplete((t, ex) -> {
    if (ex != null) {
        result.completeExceptionally(ex);
    }
}));

return result;

If, additionally, you want to cancel the remaining operations on first failure, add exec.shutdownNow(); right after result.completeExceptionally(ex);. This, of course, assumes that exec only exist for this one computation. If it doesn't, you'll have to loop over and cancel each remaining Future individually.

  • 1
    One thing that I dont understand is, allof return type is CompletableFuture<Void> and we return CompletableFuture<List<T>> without any compiler warning. I was not aware of this nature of void – Jatin May 4 '15 at 10:10
  • 1
    @Jatin I think you might be right about that. I will rethink it in the morning when I'm more awake and modify my answer accordingly. – Misha May 4 '15 at 10:31
  • 1
    @Jatin You are right, within the current implementation of reduce, so long as the stream in the sequence2 method is kept sequential, ArrayList is safe. However, it is very undesirable to write stream constructs that break if stream were made parallel. In the very least, if you rely on the stream being sequential, the 3rd argument to reduce should be (a, b) -> {throw new IllegalStateException("Parallel not allowed");} – Misha May 4 '15 at 22:20
  • 1
    That is exactly how your original solution (using thenCombine) would behave. If you want to short-circuit the computation and trigger exceptional completion immediately, it's easy to do. See updated answer. – Misha May 16 '15 at 22:10
  • 1
    @DirkHillbrecht are you using eclipse? – Misha Jan 19 '16 at 20:11
10

As Misha has pointed out, you are overusing …Async operations. Further, you are composing a complex chain of operations modelling a dependency which doesn’t reflect your program logic:

  • you create a job x which depends on the first and second job of your list
  • you create a job x+1 which depends on job x and the third job of your list
  • you create a job x+2 which depends on job x+1 and the 4th job of your list
  • you create a job x+5000 which depends on job x+4999 and the last job of your list

Then, canceling (explicitly or due to an exception) this recursively composed job might be performed recursively and might fail with a StackOverflowError. That’s implementation-dependent.

As already shown by Misha, there is a method, allOf which allows you to model your original intention, to define one job which depends on all jobs of your list.

However, it’s worth noting that even that isn’t necessary. Since you are using an unbounded thread pool executor, you can simply post an asynchronous job collecting the results into a list and you are done. Waiting for the completion is implied by asking for the result of each job anyway.

ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
List<CompletableFuture<Integer>> que = IntStream.range(0, 100000)
  .mapToObj(x -> CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(() -> {
    LockSupport.parkNanos(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toNanos((long)(Math.random()*10)));
    return x;
}, executorService)).collect(Collectors.toList());
CompletableFuture<List<Integer>> sequence = CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(
    () -> que.stream().map(CompletableFuture::join).collect(Collectors.toList()),
    executorService);

Using methods for composing dependent operations are important, when the number of threads is limited and the jobs may spawn additional asynchronous jobs, to avoid having waiting jobs stealing threads from jobs which have to complete first, but neither is the case here.

In this specific case one job simply iterating over this large number of prerequisite jobs and waiting if necessary may be more efficient than modelling this large number of dependencies and having each job to notify the dependent job about the completion.

  • 2
    One caveat is that using supplyAsync instead of allOf will consume a thread from the pool to await the completion of all tasks. If I'm not mistaken, allOf will operate within the threads assigned to respective tasks. Not a big deal for most use cases, but worth noting. – Misha May 4 '15 at 21:10
  • 1
    @Misha: I did mention that it will steal a thread if the number of threads is limited and that it works here because an unlimited thread pool executor is used (and no async sub-jobs are spawned). – Holger May 5 '15 at 8:50
  • @Holger A problem with this answer is that: If any of the later future fails, it still waits for one it is joined upon to complete. Rather, as soon as something gets failed, the returned future should be failed right then. – Jatin May 15 '15 at 10:45
  • Actually, I am even alright with this fact. but not thread stealing. – Jatin May 15 '15 at 11:15
  • 1
    @Holger you are right; I apologize. – Misha May 16 '15 at 22:14
6

You can get Spotify's CompletableFutures library and use allAsList method. I think it's inspired from Guava's Futures.allAsList method.

public static <T> CompletableFuture<List<T>> allAsList(
    List<? extends CompletionStage<? extends T>> stages) {

And here is a simple implementation if you don't want to use a library:

public <T> CompletableFuture<List<T>> allAsList(final List<CompletableFuture<T>> futures) {
    return CompletableFuture.allOf(
        futures.toArray(new CompletableFuture[futures.size()])
    ).thenApply(ignored ->
        futures.stream().map(CompletableFuture::join).collect(Collectors.toList())
    );
}
4

To add upto the accepted answer by @Misha, it can be further expanded as a collector:

 public static <T> Collector<CompletableFuture<T>, ?, CompletableFuture<List<T>>> sequenceCollector() {
    return Collectors.collectingAndThen(Collectors.toList(), com -> sequence(com));
}

Now you can:

Stream<CompletableFuture<Integer>> stream = Stream.of(
    CompletableFuture.completedFuture(1),
    CompletableFuture.completedFuture(2),
    CompletableFuture.completedFuture(3)
);
CompletableFuture<List<Integer>> ans = stream.collect(sequenceCollector());
1

In addition to Spotify Futures library you might try my code locate here: https://github.com/vsilaev/java-async-await/blob/master/net.tascalate.async.examples/src/main/java/net/tascalate/concurrent/CompletionStages.java (has a dependencies to other classes in same package)

It implements a logic to return "at least N out of M" CompletionStage-s with a policy how much errors it's allowed to tolerate. There are convinient methods for all/any cases, plus cancellation policy for the remaining futures, plus the code deals with CompletionStage-s (interface) rather than CompletableFuture (concrete class).

1

An example sequence operation using thenCombine on CompletableFuture

public<T> CompletableFuture<List<T>> sequence(List<CompletableFuture<T>> com){

    CompletableFuture<List<T>> identity = CompletableFuture.completedFuture(new ArrayList<T>());

    BiFunction<CompletableFuture<List<T>>,CompletableFuture<T>,CompletableFuture<List<T>>> combineToList = 
            (acc,next) -> acc.thenCombine(next,(a,b) -> { a.add(b); return a;});

    BinaryOperator<CompletableFuture<List<T>>> combineLists = (a,b)-> a.thenCombine(b,(l1,l2)-> { l1.addAll(l2); return l1;}) ;  

    return com.stream()
              .reduce(identity,
                      combineToList,
                      combineLists);  

   }
} 

If you don't mind using 3rd party libraries cyclops-react (I am the author) has a set of utility methods for CompletableFutures (and Optionals, Streams etc)

  List<CompletableFuture<String>> listOfFutures;

  CompletableFuture<ListX<String>> sequence =CompletableFutures.sequence(listOfFutures);
  • join is a blocking operation... thats the last thing you wanna do.. . – Dominik Dorn Nov 2 '16 at 17:12
  • Yep, thenCombine is a better option, I'll update this now. – John McClean Nov 3 '16 at 11:21
1

Javaslang has a very convenient Future API. It also allows to make a future of collection out of a collection of futures.

List<Future<String>> listOfFutures = ... 
Future<Seq<String>> futureOfList = Future.sequence(listOfFutures);

See http://static.javadoc.io/io.javaslang/javaslang/2.0.5/javaslang/concurrent/Future.html#sequence-java.lang.Iterable-

  • 1
    I like the answer. But it relies on javaslang.concurrent.Future :( – Jatin Nov 22 '16 at 11:52
  • That is true - but having worked with javaslang Future you do not want to go back to the java Future or CompletableFuture – Mathias Dpunkt Nov 22 '16 at 12:23
0

Disclaimer: This will not completely answer the initial question. It will lack the "fail all if one fails" part. However, I can't answer the actual, more generic question, because it was closed as a duplicate of this one: Java 8 CompletableFuture.allOf(...) with Collection or List. So I will answer here:

How to convert List<CompletableFuture<V>> to CompletableFuture<List<V>> using Java 8's stream API?

Summary: Use the following:

private <V> CompletableFuture<List<V>> sequence(List<CompletableFuture<V>> listOfFutures) {
    CompletableFuture<List<V>> identity = CompletableFuture.completedFuture(new ArrayList<>());

    BiFunction<CompletableFuture<List<V>>, CompletableFuture<V>, CompletableFuture<List<V>>> accumulator = (futureList, futureValue) ->
        futureValue.thenCombine(futureList, (value, list) -> {
                List<V> newList = new ArrayList<>(list.size() + 1);
                newList.addAll(list);
                newList.add(value);
                return newList;
            });

    BinaryOperator<CompletableFuture<List<V>>> combiner = (futureList1, futureList2) -> futureList1.thenCombine(futureList2, (list1, list2) -> {
        List<V> newList = new ArrayList<>(list1.size() + list2.size());
        newList.addAll(list1);
        newList.addAll(list2);
        return newList;
    });

    return listOfFutures.stream().reduce(identity, accumulator, combiner);
}

Example usage:

List<CompletableFuture<String>> listOfFutures = IntStream.range(0, numThreads)
    .mapToObj(i -> loadData(i, executor)).collect(toList());

CompletableFuture<List<String>> futureList = sequence(listOfFutures);

Complete Example:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.CompletableFuture;
import java.util.concurrent.Executor;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadLocalRandom;
import java.util.function.BiFunction;
import java.util.function.BinaryOperator;
import java.util.stream.IntStream;

import static java.util.stream.Collectors.toList;

public class ListOfFuturesToFutureOfList {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ListOfFuturesToFutureOfList test = new ListOfFuturesToFutureOfList();
        test.load(10);
    }

    public void load(int numThreads) {
        final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numThreads);

        List<CompletableFuture<String>> listOfFutures = IntStream.range(0, numThreads)
            .mapToObj(i -> loadData(i, executor)).collect(toList());

        CompletableFuture<List<String>> futureList = sequence(listOfFutures);

        System.out.println("Future complete before blocking? " + futureList.isDone());

        // this will block until all futures are completed
        List<String> data = futureList.join();
        System.out.println("Loaded data: " + data);

        System.out.println("Future complete after blocking? " + futureList.isDone());

        executor.shutdown();
    }

    public CompletableFuture<String> loadData(int dataPoint, Executor executor) {
        return CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(() -> {
            ThreadLocalRandom rnd = ThreadLocalRandom.current();

            System.out.println("Starting to load test data " + dataPoint);

            try {
                Thread.sleep(500 + rnd.nextInt(1500));
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

            System.out.println("Successfully loaded test data " + dataPoint);

            return "data " + dataPoint;
        }, executor);
    }

    private <V> CompletableFuture<List<V>> sequence(List<CompletableFuture<V>> listOfFutures) {
        CompletableFuture<List<V>> identity = CompletableFuture.completedFuture(new ArrayList<>());

        BiFunction<CompletableFuture<List<V>>, CompletableFuture<V>, CompletableFuture<List<V>>> accumulator = (futureList, futureValue) ->
            futureValue.thenCombine(futureList, (value, list) -> {
                    List<V> newList = new ArrayList<>(list.size() + 1);
                    newList.addAll(list);
                    newList.add(value);
                    return newList;
                });

        BinaryOperator<CompletableFuture<List<V>>> combiner = (futureList1, futureList2) -> futureList1.thenCombine(futureList2, (list1, list2) -> {
            List<V> newList = new ArrayList<>(list1.size() + list2.size());
            newList.addAll(list1);
            newList.addAll(list2);
            return newList;
        });

        return listOfFutures.stream().reduce(identity, accumulator, combiner);
    }

}
  • You should use thenCombine() instead of thenApply() in the accumulator, to avoid the join() call. Otherwise the calling thread will actually execute that, so the collection will only return after everything has completed. You can check this by adding a print before the futureList.join(): it only gets printed after all futures have printed “Succesfully loaded test data”. – Didier L May 18 '18 at 11:52
  • @DidierL If I change thenApply() to thenCombine() then the final join() call to the CompletableFuture<List<V>> will not block anymore but return immediately with an empty result. So the future of list will not wait until all individual futures are complete. But that was the initial idea of the whole thing. – Kai Stapel May 18 '18 at 14:21
  • Yes, indeed, I forgot that a Collector relies on mutation. The problem with your code is that it is equivalent to CompletableFuture.completedFuture(listOfFutures.stream().map(CompletableFuture::join).collect(toList()));. The collection is actually returning a future that is already completed, so there is no point in returning a future any more. – Didier L May 18 '18 at 14:40
  • You may be correct that this is functionally equivalent to my "complete example". However, the example is just for illustrating purposes on how to use the toFutureList() collector. What is not equivalent is listOfFutures.stream().map(CompletableFuture::join).collect(toList()) and listOfFutures.stream().collect(toFutureList()). The former gives you a complete result with all futures completed, while the latter gives you a future of a list of values that you can pass on, or map to other values without blocking. – Kai Stapel May 18 '18 at 16:25
  • That's where you are wrong: the latter does exactly the same. Your collector simply calls join() on all futures on the calling thread, and wraps the result in an already completed CompletableFuture. It is blocking. As I said previously, just add a print right after the stream collection and you will see that this print will only occur after all futures are completed. – Didier L May 18 '18 at 17:07

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