2

I'm new to Restlet and REST in general and want to implement a RESTful API for a running server / database. Routing and addressing seems to work fine so far but I'll need a few hints at how to handle authentication and authorization.

The situation: There are some resources with which only some users can interact in only some ways. For example, User1 might be able to GET a resource, but not PUT anything, while User2 can do both, User3 might not even read it, and User4 ist the only one allowed to use DELETE.

There is, of course, the MethodAuthorizer that sounded promising but it seems that it only discriminates between anonymous and (all) authenticated users. A RoleAuthorizer, on the other claw, won't distinguish between GET, PUT or other request methods, only between resources.

How would I go about authorizing only certain users to do only certain tasks? Is there a way to combine Authorizers, or have them execute multiple tests? Do I have to write a custom Authorizer (how would I do that)?

Also, would it be possible to use the credentials given to an Authenticator somewhere else, for example by propagating them as Strings to another method? (How) can you get the Identifier and Secret of a current request?

2

In fact, I think that you should leverage the role support of Restlet. In fact, Restlet provides two additional elements regarding security:

  • Verifier that actually authenticates the user based on provided credentials within the request
  • Enroler that loads the roles of the authenticated user.

Here is a sample for a basic authentication:

@Override
public Restlet createInboundRoot() {
    Router router = (...)

    Verifier verify = new MyVerifier(...);
    Enroler enroler = new MyEnroler(...);

    ChallengeAuthenticator guard = new ChallengeAuthenticator(getContext(),
            ChallengeScheme.HTTP_BASIC, "connector");
    guard.setVerifier(verifier);
    guard.serEnrole(enroler);
    guard.setNext(router);

    return guard;
}

The implementation of the Verifier looks like this:

public class MyVerifier extends SecretVerifier {
    public int verify(String identifier, char[] secret)
                     throws IllegalArgumentException {
        ApplicationUser user = loadUser(identifier);
        //user contains both user hints and roles
        if (user!=null
              && compare(user.getPassword().toCharArray(), secret)) {
            Request request = Request.getCurrent();
            request.getClientInfo().setUser(user);
            return SecretVerifier.RESULT_VALID;
        } else {
            return SecretVerifier.RESULT_INVALID;
        }
    }
}

The implementation of the Enroler looks like this:

public class MyEnroler implements Enroler {
    public void enrole(ClientInfo clientInfo) {
        Request request = Request.getCurrent();
        User user = request.getClientInfo().getUser();
        if (user!=null) {
            List<UserRole> roles = user.getRoles();
            if (roles!=null) {
                for (UserRole userRole : roles) {
                    // example of role creation
                    Role role = new Role(userRole.getName(), "");
                    clientInfo.getRoles().add(role);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Then within the resources, you can check the roles available within the Restlet request to determine if the authenticated user is allowed to execute the method:

public MyServerResource extends ServerResource {
    private boolean hasRole(String expectedRole) {
        List<Role> roles = request.getClientInfo().getRoles();
        for (Role role : roles) {
            if (role.getName().equals(expectedRole)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    private void checkRole(String role) {
        if (!hasRole(role)) {
            throw new ResourceException(
               Status.CLIENT_ERROR_FORBIDDEN);
        }
    }

    @Get
    public Representation getElement() {
        checkRole("read");
    }

    @Put
    public void updateElement(Representation repr) {
        checkRole("update");
    }

    @Delete
    public void deleteElement() {
        checkRole("delete");
    }
}

This approach is a bit intrusive. You could also have something more general but based on the HTTP method used and roles. For this, we need to implement a custom Authorizer and register it like this:

    Router router = (...)

    Authorizer authorizer = new MyAuthorizer();
    authorizer.setNext(router);

    Verifier verify = new MyVerifier(...);
    Enroler enroler = new MyEnroler(...);

    ChallengeAuthenticator guard = new ChallengeAuthenticator(getContext(),
            ChallengeScheme.HTTP_BASIC, "connector");
    guard.setVerifier(verifier);
    guard.serEnrole(enroler);
    guard.setNext(authorizer);

    return guard;
}

The implementation of this Authorizer could be something like that:

public class MyAuthorizer extends Authorizer {
    private String[] getRoles = new String[] { "read"};
    private String[] putRoles = new String[] { "update"};
    private String[] deleteRoles = new String[] { "delete"};

    private boolean hasRoles(String[] expectedRoles) {
        List<Role> roles = request.getClientInfo().getRoles();
        for (String expectedRole : expectedRoles) {
            for (Role role : roles) {
                if (role.getName().equals(expectedRole)) {
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    private void checkRoles(String[] roles) {
        if (!hasRole(roles)) {
            throw new ResourceException(
               Status.CLIENT_ERROR_FORBIDDEN);
        }
    }

    public boolean authorize(Request request, Response response) {
        if (!request.getClientInfo().isAuthenticated()) {
            throw new ResourceException(
               Status.CLIENT_ERROR_FORBIDDEN);
        }

        if ("GET".equals(request.getMethod().getName())) {
            checkRoles(getRoles);
        } else if ("PUT".equals(request.getMethod().getName())) {
            checkRoles(putRoles);
        } else if ("DELETE".equals(request.getMethod().getName())) {
            checkRoles(deleteRoles);
        }

        return false;
    }
}

Hope it helps you, Thierry

1
  • Thanks a bunch, Thierry! That managed to get me an Enroler/Authorizer combination letting only users with certain roles perform their respective requests. Some things didn't work out exactly as written. For example "GET".equals(request.getMethod()) and the like return false for their methods unless I toString() them, or ´request.getAttributes().put("currentUser");´ had to be changed to ´User user = (User) clientInfo.getUser();´. The code was a great help, though, and it wasn't too hard to go from there. Maybe I just have a different Restlet version.
    – buggy
    May 4 '15 at 14:47

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