I'm trying to convert an angular app from gulp to webpack. in gulp I use gulp-preprocess to replace some variables in the html page (e.g. database name) depending on the NODE_ENV. What is the best way of achieving a similar result with webpack?

  • 1
    Did alias work for you? – Juho Vepsäläinen May 4 '15 at 16:38
  • 1
    @bebraw: before I was able to get my head around aliases, I implemented the other solution you suggested based on DefinePlugin(). I do now see that alias would be a better solution and will probably refactor sometime - thanks. If you would like to include your two solutions in an answer I'll happily accept it. – kpg May 5 '15 at 11:00
  • 2
    Was directed here via console message. How to fix this in Browserify? – GN. Nov 30 '16 at 23:32
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    Is this question trying to configure the SPA at build time or load time? I note two types of configuration for SPAs: 1) development or production mode, and 2) deployment environment, e.g. development, staging, production. I think NODE_ENV can be used to configure for (1) at build time but how do we configure for (2) at deployment, e.g. configuring a production mode for different deployment environments. I hope this is relevant to this question. – Ashley Aitken Dec 3 '16 at 18:17
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    @AshleyAitken Great question of which I couldn't find an answer on this thread (maybe i missed it), but posted this new thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/44464504/… – David Tesar Jun 9 '17 at 18:29

13 Answers 13

up vote 386 down vote accepted

There are two basic ways to achieve this.

DefinePlugin

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
    'process.env.NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify(process.env.NODE_ENV || 'development')
}),

Note that this will just replace the matches "as is". That's why the string is in the format it is. You could have a more complex structure, such as an object there but you get the idea.

EnvironmentPlugin

new webpack.EnvironmentPlugin(['NODE_ENV'])

EnvironmentPlugin uses DefinePlugin internally and maps the environment values to code through it. Terser syntax.

Alias

Alternatively you could consume configuration through an aliased module. From consumer side it would look like this:

var config = require('config');

Configuration itself could look like this:

resolve: {
    alias: {
        config: path.join(__dirname, 'config', process.env.NODE_ENV)
    }
}

Let's say process.env.NODE_ENV is development. It would map into ./config/development.js then. The module it maps to can export configuration like this:

module.exports = {
    testing: 'something',
    ...
};
  • 2
    Thanks for pointing out the fact that it replaces the matches "as is". I was struggling for a while to figure out why my code was throwing an error and it was because I wasn't wrapping the value in a JSON.stringify() – pbojinov Jan 27 '16 at 18:46
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    If you're using ES2015, you can also use string interpolation - 'process.env.NODE_ENV': `"${process.env.NODE_ENV || 'development'}"` – user2688473 Feb 9 '16 at 6:15
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    @tybro0103 JSON.stringify('development') as is might not be really useful. Instead JSON.stringify(someVariable) can quite be! – superjos Feb 25 '16 at 12:32
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    You should set NODE_ENV to do that. How to set that depends on your platform. – Juho Vepsäläinen Aug 20 '16 at 16:56
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    @AnyulRivas Yeah. React uses process.env.NODE_ENV pattern and it works. – Juho Vepsäläinen May 5 '17 at 11:02

Just another option, if you want to use only a cli interface, just use the define option of webpack. I add the following script in my package.json :

"build-production": "webpack -p --define process.env.NODE_ENV='\"production\"' --progress --colors"

So I just have to run npm run build-production.

I investigated a couple of options on how to set environment-specific variables and ended up with this:

I have 2 webpack configs currently:

webpack.production.config.js

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
  'process.env':{
    'NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify('production'),
    'API_URL': JSON.stringify('http://localhost:8080/bands')
  }
}),

webpack.config.js

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
  'process.env':{
    'NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify('development'),
    'API_URL': JSON.stringify('http://10.10.10.10:8080/bands')
  }
}),

In my code I get the value of API_URL in this (brief) way:

const apiUrl = process.env.API_URL;

EDIT 3th of Nov, 2016

Webpack docs has an example: https://webpack.js.org/plugins/define-plugin/#usage

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
    PRODUCTION: JSON.stringify(true),
    VERSION: JSON.stringify("5fa3b9"),
    BROWSER_SUPPORTS_HTML5: true,
    TWO: "1+1",
    "typeof window": JSON.stringify("object")
})

With ESLint you need to specifically allow undefined variables in code, if you have no-undef rule on. http://eslint.org/docs/rules/no-undef like this:

/*global TWO*/
console.log('Running App version ' + TWO);

EDIT 7th of Sep, 2017 (Create-React-App specific)

If you're not into configuring too much, check out Create-React-App: Create-React-App - Adding Custom Environment Variables. Under the hood CRA uses Webpack anyway.

  • 2
    Did you find that this prevented any environment variables being passed in at run time? If you replace the whole of process.env then doesn't process.env.PORT for example resolve to undefined during the webpack build which means you can no longer override the port from the environment? – djskinner Aug 2 '16 at 12:38
  • Thanks so much. Finally an answer on this issue that is comprehensible! – Dave Sag Oct 24 '16 at 5:23
  • what is process? where is it coming from? if it's a node object, how does it get into the browser? – Birowsky Nov 2 '16 at 22:13
  • From node: nodejs.org/api/process.html – thevangelist Nov 3 '16 at 10:54
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    @BrianOgden Yep it is indeed, you should use something like webpack-merge for this: npmjs.com/package/webpack-merge - It's a bit out of scope for this question IMO. – thevangelist Feb 24 '17 at 10:34

You can directly use the EnvironmentPlugin available in webpack to have access to any environment variable during the transpilation.

You just have to declare the plugin in your webpack.config.js file:

var webpack = require('webpack');

module.exports = {
    /* ... */
    plugins = [
        new webpack.EnvironmentPlugin(['NODE_ENV'])
    ]
};

Note that you must declare explicitly the name of the environment variables you want to use.

You can pass any command-line argument without additional plugins using --env since webpack 2:

webpack --config webpack.config.js --env.foo=bar

Using the variable in webpack.config.js:

module.exports = function(env) {
    if (env.foo === 'bar') {
        // do something
    }
}

Source

To add to the bunch of answers personally I prefer the following:

const webpack = require('webpack');
const prod = process.argv.indexOf('-p') !== -1;

module.exports = {
  ...
  plugins: [
    new webpack.DefinePlugin({
      process: {
        env: {
          NODE_ENV: prod? `"production"`: '"development"'
        }
      }
    }),
    ...
  ]
};

Using this there is no funky env variable or cross-platform problems (with env vars). All you do is run the normal webpack or webpack -p for dev or production respectively.

Reference: Github issue

Since my Edit on the above post by thevangelist wasn't approved, posting additional information.

If you want to pick value from package.json like a defined version number and access it through DefinePlugin inside Javascript.

{"version": "0.0.1"}

Then, Import package.json inside respective webpack.config, access the attribute using the import variable, then use the attribute in the DefinePlugin.

const PACKAGE = require('../package.json');
const _version = PACKAGE.version;//Picks the version number from package.json

For example certain configuration on webpack.config is using METADATA for DefinePlugin:

const METADATA = webpackMerge(commonConfig({env: ENV}).metadata, {
  host: HOST,
  port: PORT,
  ENV: ENV,
  HMR: HMR,
  RELEASE_VERSION:_version//Version attribute retrieved from package.json
});

new DefinePlugin({
        'ENV': JSON.stringify(METADATA.ENV),
        'HMR': METADATA.HMR,
        'process.env': {
          'ENV': JSON.stringify(METADATA.ENV),
          'NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify(METADATA.ENV),
          'HMR': METADATA.HMR,
          'VERSION': JSON.stringify(METADATA.RELEASE_VERSION)//Setting it for the Scripts usage.
        }
      }),

Access this inside any typescript file:

this.versionNumber = process.env.VERSION;

The smartest way would be like this:

// webpack.config.js
plugins: [
    new webpack.DefinePlugin({
      VERSION: JSON.stringify(require("./package.json").version)
    })
  ]

Thanks to Ross Allen

Just another answer that is similar to @zer0chain's answer. However, with one distinction.

Setting webpack -p is sufficient.

It is the same as:

--define process.env.NODE_ENV="production"

And this is the same as

// webpack.config.js
const webpack = require('webpack');

module.exports = {
  //...

  plugins:[
    new webpack.DefinePlugin({
      'process.env.NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify('production')
    })
  ]
};

So you may only need something like this in package.json Node file:

{
  "name": "projectname",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1",
    "debug": "webpack -d",
    "production": "webpack -p"
  },
  "author": "prosti",
  "license": "ISC",
  "dependencies": {    
    "webpack": "^2.2.1",
    ...
  }
}

Just a few tips from the DefinePlugin:

The DefinePlugin allows you to create global constants which can be configured at compile time. This can be useful for allowing different behavior between development builds and release builds. For example, you might use a global constant to determine whether logging takes place; perhaps you perform logging in your development build but not in the release build. That's the sort of scenario the DefinePlugin facilitates.


That this is so you can check if you type webpack --help

Config options:
  --config  Path to the config file
                         [string] [default: webpack.config.js or webpackfile.js]
  --env     Enviroment passed to the config, when it is a function

Basic options:
  --context    The root directory for resolving entry point and stats
                                       [string] [default: The current directory]
  --entry      The entry point                                          [string]
  --watch, -w  Watch the filesystem for changes                        [boolean]
  --debug      Switch loaders to debug mode                            [boolean]
  --devtool    Enable devtool for better debugging experience (Example:
               --devtool eval-cheap-module-source-map)                  [string]
  -d           shortcut for --debug --devtool eval-cheap-module-source-map
               --output-pathinfo                                       [boolean]
  -p           shortcut for --optimize-minimize --define
               process.env.NODE_ENV="production" 

                      [boolean]
  --progress   Print compilation progress in percentage                [boolean]

To add to the bunch of answers:

Use ExtendedDefinePlugin instead of DefinePlugin

npm install extended-define-webpack-plugin --save-dev.

ExtendedDefinePlugin is much simpler to use and is documented :-) link

Because DefinePlugin lacks good documentation, I want to help out, by saying that it actually works like #DEFINE in c#.

#if (DEBUG)
        Console.WriteLine("Debugging is enabled.");
#endif

Thus, if you want to understand how DefinePlugin works, read the c# #define doucmentation. link

  • note: working only with web pack 1... – erwin Nov 21 '16 at 15:49

I found the following solution to be easiest to setup environment variable for Webpack 2:

For example we have a webpack settings:

var webpack = require('webpack')

let webpackConfig = (env) => { // Passing envirmonment through
                                // function is important here
    return {
        entry: {
        // entries
        },

        output: {
        // outputs
        },

        plugins: [
        // plugins
        ],

        module: {
        // modules
        },

        resolve: {
        // resolves
        }

    }
};

module.exports = webpackConfig;

Add Environment Variable in Webpack:

plugins: [
    new webpack.EnvironmentPlugin({
       NODE_ENV: 'development',
       }),
]

Define Plugin Variable and add it to plugins:

    new webpack.DefinePlugin({
        'NODE_ENV': JSON.stringify(env.NODE_ENV || 'development')
    }),

Now when running webpack command, pass env.NODE_ENV as argument:

webpack --env.NODE_ENV=development

// OR

webpack --env.NODE_ENV development

Now you can access NODE_ENV variable anywhere in your code.

I prefer using .env file for different environment.

  1. Use webpack.dev.config to copy env.dev to .env into root folder
  2. Use webpack.prod.config to copy env.prod to .env

and in code

use

require('dotenv').config(); const API = process.env.API ## which will store the value from .env file

Here is a way that has worked for me and has allowed me keep my environment variables DRY by reusing a json file.

let config = require('./settings.json');
if (__PROD__) {
  config = require('./settings-prod.json');
}

const envVars = {};
Object.keys(config).forEach((key) => {
  envVars[key] = JSON.stringify(config[key]);
});

new webpack.DefinePlugin({
  'process.env': envVars
}),

I don't know why but nobody really mentioning the simplest solution. This works for me for nodejs and grunt. As for many people the webpack can be confusing you can simply use the below line:

process.env.NODE_ENV = 'production';

With the above solution you don't really need to use envify or webpack. Sometimes the simple hardcoded solution may work for some people.

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