0

In a loop, I'm repeatedly doing this:

 for (int r=1;r<100;r++)
 {
     for (int c=1;c<100;c++)
     {
          Bitmap b = new Bitmap(
              GetResourceStream("myapp.res.icon.png",
              System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());

          grid.SetCellImage(r, c, b);
     }
 }

The Bitmap is a small icon (16x16 Pixels). But after a while I get "Invalid Parameter".

Can it be that repeated calling of this procedure fills up the memory? I have somehow assumed that this statement just delivers a pointer to the Bitmap in the resources, but it seems that it ACTUALLY CREATES A COPY of a Bitmap every time, is that true?

  • 2
    Do you dispose b? – CodeCaster May 4 '15 at 14:11
  • do not just paste code like that without showing the entire Method and or Event where the code resides.. also post all relevant code.. if you have a repeated call of new Bitmap() then show where the repeated call is being made.. it appears that you have a single call here only if you want you can use the following to dispose of b GC.Collect(); and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); – MethodMan May 4 '15 at 14:11
  • This will create a new bitmap. – Christo May 4 '15 at 14:12
  • You need to dispose of the bitmap when you're done with it - Bitmap is an unmanaged resource (wrapped in a managed type) and you must release it when you don't need it anymore. – xxbbcc May 4 '15 at 14:12
  • 1
    Well, b is assigned to a cell's icon of a grid, and then b is disposed. But I understand the problem now. This way, I am creating thousands of copies of the Bitmap in memory, and every single copy is assigned to a single cell. I could also create just one single icon, and put the reference to each cell. – SQL Police May 4 '15 at 14:22
1

It creates new object from your stream. What is worse it allocates native resources, than you have to dispose it if you don't need it. To use copy of image simply copy the bitmap object reference:

Bitmap b = new Bitmap(
    GetResourceStream("myapp.res.icon.png",
    System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
var b2 = b;
var b3 = b;
  • Yes, indeed, that's the solution. What means "native resources"? I can faintly remember that in early windows versions there was a restricted memory area for resources, but is this still true for Windows 8 ? – SQL Police May 4 '15 at 14:24
  • native resource is allocated by GDI+ – Aik May 4 '15 at 14:40
1

As the class Bitmap is derived from Image, it implements IDisposable. Consequently, you need to dispose the Bitmap when it is no longer needed, which can be done via an explicit call to Dispose, but the preferred way is using the using keyword if possible.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.