13

This code has passed several online validation tests. I don't know what is wrong. After the CONCAT function, it says I need a semicolon, though there already is one there. And on the end it says it is extraneous input when it is expecting an end of statement. What gives?

create procedure AddColumnUnlessExists(
    IN dbName tinytext,
    IN tableName tinytext,
    IN fieldName tinytext,
    IN fieldDef text)
begin
    IF NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT * FROM information_schema.COLUMNS
        WHERE column_name=fieldName
        and table_name=tableName
        and table_schema=dbName
        )
    THEN
        set @ddl = CONCAT('ALTER TABLE ', dbName, '.', tableName, ' ADD COLUMN ', fieldName, ' ', fieldDef);
        prepare stmt from @ddl;
        execute stmt;
    END IF;
end;
3
  • do you use phpMyAdmin to set this stored procedure?
    – Alex
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 16:25
  • Nope, I'm working in MySQL Workbench, directly in a query window. Commented May 4, 2015 at 16:31
  • did you try my answer?
    – Alex
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

28

I think the problem is : you are not using DELIMITER.

So just put it this way:

DELIMITER //
create procedure AddColumnUnlessExists(
    IN dbName tinytext,
    IN tableName tinytext,
    IN fieldName tinytext,
    IN fieldDef text)
begin
    IF NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT * FROM information_schema.COLUMNS
        WHERE column_name=fieldName
        and table_name=tableName
        and table_schema=dbName
        )
    THEN
        set @ddl = CONCAT('ALTER TABLE ', dbName, '.', tableName, ' ADD COLUMN ', fieldName, ' ', fieldDef);
        prepare stmt from @ddl;
        execute stmt;
    END IF;
end //
DELIMITER ;

EDIT https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/stored-programs-defining.html

If you use the mysql client program to define a stored program containing semicolon characters, a problem arises. By default, mysql itself recognizes the semicolon as a statement delimiter, so you must redefine the delimiter temporarily to cause mysql to pass the entire stored program definition to the server.

To redefine the mysql delimiter, use the delimiter command. The following example shows how to do this for the dorepeat() procedure just shown. The delimiter is changed to // to enable the entire definition to be passed to the server as a single statement, and then restored to ; before invoking the procedure. This enables the ; delimiter used in the procedure body to be passed through to the server rather than being interpreted by mysql itself.

4
  • 2
    I'm not quite clear as to what exactly this changed, but this got things to work. But I had to delete the last DELIMITER. It was giving extraneous input found Commented May 4, 2015 at 20:27
  • yes you have a reason, you should add semicolon there. check my update.
    – Alex
    Commented May 4, 2015 at 20:30
  • 1
    Extra space between last DELIMITER and semicolon worked for me. DELIMITER ;
    – VK321
    Commented Oct 3, 2016 at 14:18
  • the same problem as in the command line since the ; in the procedure body conflicts with the final end ; Commented Oct 29, 2016 at 2:45
5

The problem is the delimiter, you should change the delimiter. I hadthe same problem and changing the delimiter solved the issue. Refer to @Alex Answer.

Here is an simple explanation, quoting MySQL documentation:

The example uses the mysql client delimiter command to change the statement delimiter from ; to // while the procedure is being defined. This enables the ; delimiter used in the procedure body to be passed through to the server rather than being interpreted by mysql itself. See Section 22.1, “Defining Stored Programs”.

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/create-procedure.html

DELIMITER // 
create procedure some_procedure() 
# Do what you need here

END // 

DELIMITER ; # change the delimiter back again.

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