4

When I'm in C++, and I call an overloaded function foo, like so:

foo('e' - (char) 5)

it can output "this is a char" or "this is an int" based on the type result. I get "this is an int" from my program, like this:

#include <iostream>

void foo(char x)
{
    std::cout << "output is a char" << std::endl;
}
void foo(int x)
{
    std::cout << "output is an int" << std::endl;
}
int main()
{
    foo('a' + (char) 5);
}

My instructor says that in C, the expression above, ('a' + (char) 5), evaluates as a char. I see in the C99 standard that chars are promoted to ints to find the sum, but does C recast them back to chars when it's done? I can't find any references that seem credible saying one way or another what C actually does after the promotion is completed, and the sum is found.

Is the sum left as an int, or given as a char? How can I prove this in C, or is there a reference I'm not understanding/finding?

  • 3
    Hence, prove your instructor wrong by citing the standard an providing the test! – user2249683 May 4 '15 at 16:57
  • 3
    @chris , now there's a <iostream> and cout in a question tagged C – Arun A S May 4 '15 at 16:59
  • 3
    @ArunA.S and function overloading..... – user3528438 May 4 '15 at 17:00
  • 1
    @ArunA.S I think that's okay. The question is actually about C, even though it uses C++ code as examples/comparison. – aschepler May 4 '15 at 17:02
  • 1
    @ArunA.S, I know, it's not an easy decision, but the OP looks like he wants a C answer, and the C++ looks to be there as an assumption that C and C++ have the same answer. This is harder to test in C for the OP. My main reason for removing it was to keep the C++ answers away. – chris May 4 '15 at 17:02
6

From the C Standard, 6.3.1.8 Usual arithmetic conversions, emphasis mine:

Many operators that expect operands of arithmetic type cause conversions and yield result types in a similar way. The purpose is to determine a common real type for the operands and result. For the specified operands, each operand is converted, without change of type domain, to a type whose corresponding real type is the common real type. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, the common real type is also the corresponding real type of the result, whose type domain is the type domain of the operands if they are the same, and complex otherwise. This pattern is called the usual arithmetic conversions:

  • First, if the correspeonding real type of either operand is long double...
  • Otherwise, if the corresponding real type of either operand is double...
  • Otherwise, if the corresponding real type of either operand is float...
  • Otherwise, the integer promotions are performed on both operands. Then the following rules are applied to the promoted operands:
    • If both operands have the same type, then no further conversion is needed.

So you are exactly correct. The type of the expression 'a' + (char) 5 is int. There is no recasting back to char, unless explicitly asked for by the user. Note that 'a' here has type int, so it's only the (char)5 that needs to be promoted. This is stipulated in 6.4.4.4 Character Constants:

An integer character constant is a sequence of one or more multibyte characters enclosed in single-quotes, as in 'x'.
...
An integer character constant has type int.

There is an example demonstrating the explicit recasting to char:

In executing the fragment

char c1, c2;
/* ... */
c1 = c1 + c2

the ‘‘integer promotions’’ require that the abstract machine promote the value of each variable to int size and then add the two ints and truncate the sum. Provided the addition of two chars can be done without overflow, or with overflow wrapping silently to produce the correct result, the actual execution need only produce the same result, possibly omitting the promotions.

The truncation here only happens because we assign back to a char.

|improve this answer|||||
3

No, C does not recast them back to chars.

The standard (ISO/IEC 9899:1999) says (6.3.1.8 Usual arithmetic conversions):

Many operators that expect operands of arithmetic type cause conversions and yield result types in a similar way. The purpose is to determine a common real type for the operands and result. For the specified operands, each operand is converted, without change of type domain, to a type whose corresponding real type is the common real type. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, the common real type is also the corresponding real type of the result, whose type domain is determined by the operator.

|improve this answer|||||
2

You can't determine the type of an expression as easily in C, but you can easily determine the size of an expression:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
    printf("sizeof(char)==1\n");
    printf("sizeof(int)==%u\n", sizeof(int));
    printf("sizeof('a' + (char) 5)==%u\n", sizeof('a' + (char) 5));
    return 0;
}

This gives me:

sizeof(char)==1
sizeof(int)==4
sizeof('a' + (char) 5)==4

which at least proves that 'a' + (char) 5 is not of type char.

|improve this answer|||||
  • This is not a reliable solution. It would fail on machines like ones whose sizeof(int40_t) and sizeof(int64_t) are both 8, which I work with every day. – user3528438 May 4 '15 at 17:11
  • I didn't claim it determined the exact type, just that it ruled out char. – aschepler May 4 '15 at 17:12
  • I'm just saying that different types, including char and int, can have same size, but still be distinct types because of range and overflow behaviour. – user3528438 May 4 '15 at 17:15
  • This was extremely helpful as well. I understood that this wasn't proof that it's an int, but it was helpful for me to provide in my response as proof that, at the very least, it's not a char either. Thanks! – MagnaVis May 4 '15 at 19:42
2

Your instructor seems to be wrong. Additional to your standard find that the arithmetic promotes to int, we can use a simple test program to show the behavior (no standard prove of course, but the same level of proof as your C++ test):

#include <stdio.h>

int main () {
   printf("%g",'c' - (char)5);
}

produces

Warning: format specifies type 'double' but argument has type 'int'

with gcc and clang.

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0

It's promoted to an int, and there's nothing to tell the compiler it should use anything else. You can convert back to a char like this:

foo((char)('a' + 5));

This tells the compiler to treat the result of the calculation as a char, otherwise it leaves it as an int.

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0

Section 6.5.2.2/6

If the expression that denotes the called function has a type that does not include a prototype, the integer promotions are performed on each argument...

So the answer to your question depends on the function prototype. If the function is declared as

void foo(int x)

or

void foo()

then the function argument will be passed as an int.

OTOH, if the function is declared as

void foo( char x )

then the result of the expression will be implicitly cast to char.

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0

In C (unlike C++), the character literal 'a' has type int (§6.4.4.4¶10: "An integer character constant has type int.")

Even if that were not the case, the C standard clearly states that prior to the evaluation of the operator +, "[i]f both operands have arithmetic type, the usual arithmetic conversions are performed on them." (C11, §6.5.6 ¶4) In this respect, C and C++ have identical semantics. (See [expr.add] §5.7¶1 of C++)

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-1

From the C++ Standard (C++ Working Draft N3797, 5.7 Additive operators)

1 The additive operators + and - group left-to-right. The usual arithmetic conversions are performed for operands of arithmetic or enumeration type.

and (5 Expressions)

10 Many binary operators that expect operands of arithmetic or enumeration type cause conversions and yield result types in a similar way. The purpose is to yield a common type, which is also the type of the result. This pattern is called the usual arithmetic conversions, which are defined as follows:

...

— Otherwise, the integral promotions (4.5) shall be performed on both operands.62 Then the following rules shall be applied to the promoted operands:

Thus the expression in the function call

foo('a' + (char) 5);

has type int. To call the overloaded function with parameter of type char you have to write for example

foo( char( 'a' + 5 ) );

or

foo( ( char )( 'a' + 5 ) );

or you can use C++ casting like

foo( static_cast<char>( 'a' + 5 ) );

The above quotes from the C++ Standard also are valid for C Standard. The visible difference is that in C++ character literals have type char while in C they have type int.

So in C++ the output of the statement

std::cout << sizeof( 'a' ) << std::endl;

will be equal to 1.

While in C the output of the statement

printf( "%zu\n", sizeof( 'a' ) );

will be equal to sizeof( int ) that is usually equal to 4.

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  • @Dieter Lücking It depends on what working draft you refer to. – Vlad from Moscow May 4 '15 at 17:24
  • Please add the version to your answer – user2249683 May 4 '15 at 17:43

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