6

I wrote the following structure for use in an Arduino software PWM library I'm making, to PWM up to 20 pins at once (on an Uno) or 70 pins at once (on a Mega).

As written, the ISR portion of the code (eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdate()), processing an array of this structure, takes 133us to run. VERY strangely, however, if I uncomment the line "byte flags1;" (in the struct), though flags1 is NOT used anywhere yet, the ISR now takes 158us to run. Then, if I uncomment "byte flags2;" so that BOTH flags are now uncommented, the runtime drops back down to where it was before (133us).

Why is this happening!? And how do I fix it? (ie: I want to ensure consistently fast code, for this particular function, not code that is inexplicably fickle). Adding one byte dramatically slows down the code, yet adding two makes no change at all.

I am trying to optimize the code (and I needed to add another feature too, requiring a single byte for flags), but I don't understand why adding one unused byte slows the code down by 25us, yet adding two unused bytes doesn't change the run-time at all.

I need to understand this to ensure my optimizations consistently work.

In .h file (my original struct, using C-style typedef'ed struct):

typedef struct softPWMpin //global struct
{
  //VOLATILE VARIBLES (WILL BE ACCESSED IN AND OUTSIDE OF ISRs)
  //for pin write access:
  volatile byte pinBitMask;
  volatile byte* volatile p_PORT_out; //pointer to port output register; NB: the 1st "volatile" says the port itself (1 byte) is volatile, the 2nd "volatile" says the *pointer* itself (2 bytes, pointing to the port) is volatile.
  //for PWM output:
  volatile unsigned long resolution;
  volatile unsigned long PWMvalue; //Note: duty cycle = PWMvalue/(resolution - 1) = PWMvalue/topValue;
                          //ex: if resolution is 256, topValue is 255
                          //if PWMvalue = 255, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 255/255 = 1 = 100%
                          //if PWMvalue = 50, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 50/255 = 0.196 = 19.6%
  //byte flags1;
  //byte flags2;

  //NON-VOLATILE VARIABLES (WILL ONLY BE ACCESSED INSIDE AN ISR, OR OUTSIDE AN ISR, BUT NOT BOTH)
  unsigned long counter; //incremented each time update() is called; goes back to zero after reaching topValue; does NOT need to be volatile, since only the update function updates this (it is read-to or written from nowhere else)
} softPWMpin_t; 

In .h file (new, using C++ style struct....to see if it makes any difference, per the comments. It appears to make no difference in any way, including run-time and compiled size)

struct softPWMpin //global struct
{
  //VOLATILE VARIBLES (WILL BE ACCESSED IN AND OUTSIDE OF ISRs)
  //for pin write access:
  volatile byte pinBitMask;
  volatile byte* volatile p_PORT_out; //pointer to port output register; NB: the 1st "volatile" says the port itself (1 byte) is volatile, the 2nd "volatile" says the *pointer* itself (2 bytes, pointing to the port) is volatile.
  //for PWM output:
  volatile unsigned long resolution;
  volatile unsigned long PWMvalue; //Note: duty cycle = PWMvalue/(resolution - 1) = PWMvalue/topValue;
                          //ex: if resolution is 256, topValue is 255
                          //if PWMvalue = 255, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 255/255 = 1 = 100%
                          //if PWMvalue = 50, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 50/255 = 0.196 = 19.6%
  //byte flags1;
  //byte flags2;

  //NON-VOLATILE VARIABLES (WILL ONLY BE ACCESSED INSIDE AN ISR, OR OUTSIDE AN ISR, BUT NOT BOTH)
  unsigned long counter; //incremented each time update() is called; goes back to zero after reaching topValue; does NOT need to be volatile, since only the update function updates this (it is read-to or written from nowhere else)
}; 

In .cpp file (here I am creating the array of structs, and here is the update function which is called at a fixed rate in an ISR, via timer interrupts):

//static softPWMpin_t PWMpins[MAX_NUMBER_SOFTWARE_PWM_PINS]; //C-style, old, MAX_NUMBER_SOFTWARE_PWM_PINS = 20; static to give it file scope only
static softPWMpin PWMpins[MAX_NUMBER_SOFTWARE_PWM_PINS]; //C++-style, old, MAX_NUMBER_SOFTWARE_PWM_PINS = 20; static to give it file scope only

//This function must be placed within an ISR, to be called at a fixed interval
void eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdate()
{
  //Forced nonatomic block (ie: interrupts *enabled*)
  byte SREG_old = SREG; //[1 clock cycle]
  interrupts(); //[1 clock cycle] turn interrupts ON to allow *nested interrupts* (ex: handling of time-sensitive timing, such as reading incoming PWM signals or counting Timer2 overflows)
  {    
    //first, increment all counters of attached pins (ie: where the value != PIN_NOT_ATTACHED)
    //pinMapArray
    for (byte pin=0; pin<NUM_DIGITAL_PINS; pin++)
    {
      byte i = pinMapArray[pin]; //[2 clock cycles: 0.125us]; No need to turn off interrupts to read this volatile variable here since reading pinMapArray[pin] is an atomic operation (since it's a single byte)
      if (i != PIN_NOT_ATTACHED) //if the pin IS attached, increment counter and decide what to do with pin...
      {
        //Read volatile variables ONE time, all at once, to optimize code (volatile variables take more time to read [I know] since their values can't be recalled from registers [I believe]).
        noInterrupts(); //[1 clock cycle] turn off interrupts to read non-atomic volatile variables that could be updated simultaneously right now in another ISR, since nested interrupts are enabled here
        unsigned long resolution = PWMpins[i].resolution;
        unsigned long PWMvalue = PWMpins[i].PWMvalue;
        volatile byte* p_PORT_out = PWMpins[i].p_PORT_out; //[0.44us raw: 5 clock cycles, 0.3125us]
        interrupts(); //[1 clock cycle]

        //handle edge cases FIRST (PWMvalue==0 and PMWvalue==topValue), since if an edge case exists we should NOT do the main case handling below
        if (PWMvalue==0) //the PWM command is 0% duty cycle
        {
          fastDigitalWrite(p_PORT_out,PWMpins[i].pinBitMask,LOW); //write LOW [1.19us raw: 17 clock cycles, 1.0625us]
        }
        else if (PWMvalue==resolution-1) //the PWM command is 100% duty cycle
        {
          fastDigitalWrite(p_PORT_out,PWMpins[i].pinBitMask,HIGH); //write HIGH [0.88us raw; 12 clock cycles, 0.75us]
        }
        //THEN handle main cases (PWMvalue is > 0 and < topValue)
        else //(0% < PWM command < 100%)
        {
          PWMpins[i].counter++; //not volatile
          if (PWMpins[i].counter >= resolution)
          {
            PWMpins[i].counter = 0; //reset
            fastDigitalWrite(p_PORT_out,PWMpins[i].pinBitMask,HIGH);
          }
          else if (PWMpins[i].counter>=PWMvalue)
          {
            fastDigitalWrite(p_PORT_out,PWMpins[i].pinBitMask,LOW); //write LOW [1.18us raw: 17 clock cycles, 1.0625us]
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
  SREG = SREG_old; //restore interrupt enable status
}

Update (5/4/2015, 8:58pm):

I've tried changing the alignment via the aligned attribute. My compiler is gcc.

Here's how I modified the struct in the .h file to add the attribute (it's on the very last line). Note that I also changed the order of the struct members to be largest to smallest:

struct softPWMpin //C++ style
{
  volatile unsigned long resolution;
  volatile unsigned long PWMvalue; //Note: duty cycle = PWMvalue/(resolution - 1) = PWMvalue/topValue;
                          //ex: if resolution is 256, topValue is 255
                          //if PWMvalue = 255, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 255/255 = 1 = 100%
                          //if PWMvalue = 50, duty_cycle = PWMvalue/topValue = 50/255 = 0.196 = 19.6%
  unsigned long counter; //incremented each time update() is called; goes back to zero after reaching topValue; does NOT need to be volatile, since only the update function updates this (it is read-to or written from nowhere else)
  volatile byte* volatile p_PORT_out; //pointer to port output register; NB: the 1st "volatile" says the port itself (1 byte) is volatile, the 2nd "volatile" says the *pointer* itself (2 bytes, pointing to the port) is volatile.
  volatile byte pinBitMask;

  // byte flags1;
  // byte flags2;
} __attribute__ ((aligned));

Source: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-3.1/gcc/Type-Attributes.html

Here's the results of what I've tried so far:

__attribute__ ((aligned));  
__attribute__ ((aligned(1)));  
__attribute__ ((aligned(2)));  
__attribute__ ((aligned(4)));  
__attribute__ ((aligned(8)));  

None of them seem to fix the problem I see when I add one flag byte. When leaving the flag bytes commented out the 2-8 ones make the run-time longer than 133us, and the align 1 one makes no difference (run-time stays 133us), implying that it is what is already occurring with the attribute not added at all. Additionally, even when I use the align options of 2, 4, 8, the sizeof(PWMvalue) function still returns the exact number of bytes in the struct, with no additional padding.

...still don't know what's going on...

Update, 11:02pm:

(see comments below) Optimization levels definitely have an effect. When I changed the compiler optimization level from -Os to -O2, for instance, the base case remained at 133us (as before), uncommenting flags1 gave me 120us (vs 158us), and uncommenting flags1 and flags2 simultaneously gave me 132us (vs 133us). This still doesn't answer my question, but I've at least learned that optimization levels exist, and how to change them.

Summary of above paragraph:

Processing time of (of eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdate() function)
Optimization   No flags     w/flags1     w/flags1+flags2
Os             133us        158us        133us
O2             132us        120us        132us

Memory Use (bytes: flash/global vars SRAM/sizeof(softPWMpin)/sizeof(PWMpins))
Optimization   No flags          w/flags1          w/flags1+flags2
Os             4020/591/15/300   3950/611/16/320   4020/631/17/340
O2             4154/591/15/300   4064/611/16/320   4154/631/17/340

Update (5/5/2015, 4:05pm):

  • Just updated the tables above with more detailed information.
  • Added resources below.

Resources:

Sources for gcc compiler optimization levels:
- https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Optimize-Options.html
- https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gnat_ugn/Optimization-Levels.html
- http://www.rapidtables.com/code/linux/gcc/gcc-o.htm

How to change compiler settings in Arduino IDE:
- http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-IDE-16x-compiler-optimisations-faster-code/

Info on structure packing:
- http://www.catb.org/esr/structure-packing/

Data Alignment:
- http://www.songho.ca/misc/alignment/dataalign.html

Writing efficient C code for an 8-bit Atmel AVR Microcontroller
- AVR035 Efficient C Coding for AVR - doc1497 - http://www.atmel.com/images/doc1497.pdf
- AVR4027 Tips and Tricks to Optimize Your C Code for 8-bit AVR Microcontrollers - doc8453 - http://www.atmel.com/images/doc8453.pdf

Additional info that may prove useful to help you help me with my problem:

FOR NO FLAGS (flags1 and flags2 commented out), and Os Optimization
Build Preferences (from buildprefs.txt file where Arduino spits out compiled code):
For me: "C:\Users\Gabriel\AppData\Local\Temp\build8427371380606368699.tmp"

build.arch = AVR
build.board = AVR_UNO
build.core = arduino
build.core.path = C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\hardware\arduino\avr\cores\arduino
build.extra_flags = 
build.f_cpu = 16000000L
build.mcu = atmega328p
build.path = C:\Users\Gabriel\AppData\Local\Temp\build8427371380606368699.tmp
build.project_name = software_PWM_fade13_speed_test2.cpp
build.system.path = C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\hardware\arduino\avr\system
build.usb_flags = -DUSB_VID={build.vid} -DUSB_PID={build.pid} '-DUSB_MANUFACTURER={build.usb_manufacturer}' '-DUSB_PRODUCT={build.usb_product}'
build.usb_manufacturer = 
build.variant = standard
build.variant.path = C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\hardware\arduino\avr\variants\standard
build.verbose = true
build.warn_data_percentage = 75
compiler.S.extra_flags = 
compiler.S.flags = -c -g -x assembler-with-cpp
compiler.ar.cmd = avr-ar
compiler.ar.extra_flags = 
compiler.ar.flags = rcs
compiler.c.cmd = avr-gcc
compiler.c.elf.cmd = avr-gcc
compiler.c.elf.extra_flags = 
compiler.c.elf.flags = -w -Os -Wl,--gc-sections
compiler.c.extra_flags = 
compiler.c.flags = -c -g -Os -w -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections -MMD
compiler.cpp.cmd = avr-g++
compiler.cpp.extra_flags = 
compiler.cpp.flags = -c -g -Os -w -fno-exceptions -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections -fno-threadsafe-statics -MMD
compiler.elf2hex.cmd = avr-objcopy
compiler.elf2hex.extra_flags = 
compiler.elf2hex.flags = -O ihex -R .eeprom
compiler.ldflags = 
compiler.objcopy.cmd = avr-objcopy
compiler.objcopy.eep.extra_flags = 
compiler.objcopy.eep.flags = -O ihex -j .eeprom --set-section-flags=.eeprom=alloc,load --no-change-warnings --change-section-lma .eeprom=0
compiler.path = {runtime.ide.path}/hardware/tools/avr/bin/
compiler.size.cmd = avr-size

Some of the Assembly: (Os, no flags):

00000328 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev>:
 328:   8f 92           push    r8
 32a:   9f 92           push    r9
 32c:   af 92           push    r10
 32e:   bf 92           push    r11
 330:   cf 92           push    r12
 332:   df 92           push    r13
 334:   ef 92           push    r14
 336:   ff 92           push    r15
 338:   0f 93           push    r16
 33a:   1f 93           push    r17
 33c:   cf 93           push    r28
 33e:   df 93           push    r29
 340:   0f b7           in  r16, 0x3f   ; 63
 342:   78 94           sei
 344:   20 e0           ldi r18, 0x00   ; 0
 346:   30 e0           ldi r19, 0x00   ; 0
 348:   1f e0           ldi r17, 0x0F   ; 15
 34a:   f9 01           movw    r30, r18
 34c:   e8 5a           subi    r30, 0xA8   ; 168
 34e:   fe 4f           sbci    r31, 0xFE   ; 254
 350:   80 81           ld  r24, Z
 352:   8f 3f           cpi r24, 0xFF   ; 255
 354:   09 f4           brne    .+2         ; 0x358 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0x30>
 356:   67 c0           rjmp    .+206       ; 0x426 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xfe>
 358:   f8 94           cli
 35a:   90 e0           ldi r25, 0x00   ; 0
 35c:   18 9f           mul r17, r24
 35e:   f0 01           movw    r30, r0
 360:   19 9f           mul r17, r25
 362:   f0 0d           add r31, r0
 364:   11 24           eor r1, r1
 366:   e4 59           subi    r30, 0x94   ; 148
 368:   fe 4f           sbci    r31, 0xFE   ; 254
 36a:   c0 80           ld  r12, Z
 36c:   d1 80           ldd r13, Z+1    ; 0x01
 36e:   e2 80           ldd r14, Z+2    ; 0x02
 370:   f3 80           ldd r15, Z+3    ; 0x03
 372:   44 81           ldd r20, Z+4    ; 0x04
 374:   55 81           ldd r21, Z+5    ; 0x05
 376:   66 81           ldd r22, Z+6    ; 0x06
 378:   77 81           ldd r23, Z+7    ; 0x07
 37a:   04 84           ldd r0, Z+12    ; 0x0c
 37c:   f5 85           ldd r31, Z+13   ; 0x0d
 37e:   e0 2d           mov r30, r0
 380:   78 94           sei
 382:   41 15           cp  r20, r1
 384:   51 05           cpc r21, r1
 386:   61 05           cpc r22, r1
 388:   71 05           cpc r23, r1
 38a:   51 f4           brne    .+20        ; 0x3a0 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0x78>
 38c:   18 9f           mul r17, r24
 38e:   d0 01           movw    r26, r0
 390:   19 9f           mul r17, r25
 392:   b0 0d           add r27, r0
 394:   11 24           eor r1, r1
 396:   a4 59           subi    r26, 0x94   ; 148
 398:   be 4f           sbci    r27, 0xFE   ; 254
 39a:   1e 96           adiw    r26, 0x0e   ; 14
 39c:   4c 91           ld  r20, X
 39e:   3b c0           rjmp    .+118       ; 0x416 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xee>
 3a0:   46 01           movw    r8, r12
 3a2:   57 01           movw    r10, r14
 3a4:   a1 e0           ldi r26, 0x01   ; 1
 3a6:   8a 1a           sub r8, r26
 3a8:   91 08           sbc r9, r1
 3aa:   a1 08           sbc r10, r1
 3ac:   b1 08           sbc r11, r1
 3ae:   48 15           cp  r20, r8
 3b0:   59 05           cpc r21, r9
 3b2:   6a 05           cpc r22, r10
 3b4:   7b 05           cpc r23, r11
 3b6:   51 f4           brne    .+20        ; 0x3cc <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xa4>
 3b8:   18 9f           mul r17, r24
 3ba:   d0 01           movw    r26, r0
 3bc:   19 9f           mul r17, r25
 3be:   b0 0d           add r27, r0
 3c0:   11 24           eor r1, r1
 3c2:   a4 59           subi    r26, 0x94   ; 148
 3c4:   be 4f           sbci    r27, 0xFE   ; 254
 3c6:   1e 96           adiw    r26, 0x0e   ; 14
 3c8:   9c 91           ld  r25, X
 3ca:   1c c0           rjmp    .+56        ; 0x404 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xdc>
 3cc:   18 9f           mul r17, r24
 3ce:   e0 01           movw    r28, r0
 3d0:   19 9f           mul r17, r25
 3d2:   d0 0d           add r29, r0
 3d4:   11 24           eor r1, r1
 3d6:   c4 59           subi    r28, 0x94   ; 148
 3d8:   de 4f           sbci    r29, 0xFE   ; 254
 3da:   88 85           ldd r24, Y+8    ; 0x08
 3dc:   99 85           ldd r25, Y+9    ; 0x09
 3de:   aa 85           ldd r26, Y+10   ; 0x0a
 3e0:   bb 85           ldd r27, Y+11   ; 0x0b
 3e2:   01 96           adiw    r24, 0x01   ; 1
 3e4:   a1 1d           adc r26, r1
 3e6:   b1 1d           adc r27, r1
 3e8:   88 87           std Y+8, r24    ; 0x08
 3ea:   99 87           std Y+9, r25    ; 0x09
 3ec:   aa 87           std Y+10, r26   ; 0x0a
 3ee:   bb 87           std Y+11, r27   ; 0x0b
 3f0:   8c 15           cp  r24, r12
 3f2:   9d 05           cpc r25, r13
 3f4:   ae 05           cpc r26, r14
 3f6:   bf 05           cpc r27, r15
 3f8:   40 f0           brcs    .+16        ; 0x40a <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xe2>
 3fa:   18 86           std Y+8, r1 ; 0x08
 3fc:   19 86           std Y+9, r1 ; 0x09
 3fe:   1a 86           std Y+10, r1    ; 0x0a
 400:   1b 86           std Y+11, r1    ; 0x0b
 402:   9e 85           ldd r25, Y+14   ; 0x0e
 404:   80 81           ld  r24, Z
 406:   89 2b           or  r24, r25
 408:   0d c0           rjmp    .+26        ; 0x424 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xfc>
 40a:   84 17           cp  r24, r20
 40c:   95 07           cpc r25, r21
 40e:   a6 07           cpc r26, r22
 410:   b7 07           cpc r27, r23
 412:   48 f0           brcs    .+18        ; 0x426 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0xfe>
 414:   4e 85           ldd r20, Y+14   ; 0x0e
 416:   80 81           ld  r24, Z
 418:   90 e0           ldi r25, 0x00   ; 0
 41a:   50 e0           ldi r21, 0x00   ; 0
 41c:   40 95           com r20
 41e:   50 95           com r21
 420:   84 23           and r24, r20
 422:   95 23           and r25, r21
 424:   80 83           st  Z, r24
 426:   2f 5f           subi    r18, 0xFF   ; 255
 428:   3f 4f           sbci    r19, 0xFF   ; 255
 42a:   24 31           cpi r18, 0x14   ; 20
 42c:   31 05           cpc r19, r1
 42e:   09 f0           breq    .+2         ; 0x432 <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0x10a>
 430:   8c cf           rjmp    .-232       ; 0x34a <_Z25eRCaGuy_SoftwarePWMupdatev+0x22>
 432:   0f bf           out 0x3f, r16   ; 63
 434:   df 91           pop r29
 436:   cf 91           pop r28
 438:   1f 91           pop r17
 43a:   0f 91           pop r16
 43c:   ff 90           pop r15
 43e:   ef 90           pop r14
 440:   df 90           pop r13
 442:   cf 90           pop r12
 444:   bf 90           pop r11
 446:   af 90           pop r10
 448:   9f 90           pop r9
 44a:   8f 90           pop r8
 44c:   08 95           ret
  • 1
    What are your packing settings? What happens to sizeof(softPWMpin) with each of your changes? Why are you using C style typedef struct in C++ code? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 4 '15 at 19:22
  • 1
    Yakk, as-is, sizeof(softPWMpin) is 15. When I add flags1 it goes up to 16, and when I add flags2 as well, it goes up to 17. According to my manual count this is also correct. Byte = 1, unsigned long = 4, pointer = 2. – Gabriel Staples May 4 '15 at 20:12
  • 2
    Looking into Structure Packing....just found this here: catb.org/esr/structure-packing. Hopefully this is the right track... – Gabriel Staples May 4 '15 at 20:20
  • 1
    Dieter, thanks. That link I found does have good info. However, I tried re-ordering the structure. No luck. The same weird speed change exists. Also, it appears the structure is being packed by the compiler, rather than aligned to boundaries, as it seems that there is no padding or "slop" whatsoever. I'm betting that this is slowing down my code execution under certain cases....one of which being when I add a single byte. Perhaps I need to force an attribute to NOT pack this particular data structure? This would sacrifice memory but I think give me better speed. – Gabriel Staples May 4 '15 at 21:36
  • 1
    @DavidRoundy: AVR has no cache. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 5 '15 at 1:35
5

This is almost certainly an alignment issue. Judging by the size of your struct, your compiler seems to be automatically packing it.


The LDR instruction loads a 4-byte value into a register, and operates on 4-byte boundaries. If it needs to load a memory address that isn't on a 4-byte boundary, it actually performs two loads and combines them to obtain the value at that address.

For example, if you want to load the 4-byte value at 0x02, the processor will do two loads, as 0x02 does not fall on a 4-byte boundary.

Let's say we have the following memory at address 0x00 and we want to load the 4-byte value at 0x02 into the register r0:

Address |0x00|0x01|0x02|0x03|0x04|0x05|0x06|0x07|0x08|
Value   | 12 | 34 | 56 | 78 | 90 | AB | CD | EF | 12 |
------------------------------------------------------
r0: 00 00 00 00

It will first load the 4 bytes at 0x00, because that's the 4-byte segment containing 0x02, and store the 2 bytes at 0x02 and 0x03 in the register:

Address |0x00|0x01|0x02|0x03|0x04|0x05|0x06|0x07|
Value   | 12 | 34 | 56 | 78 | 90 | AB | CD | EF |
Load 1  |           **   ** |
------------------------------------------------------
r0: 56 78 00 00

It will then load the 4 bytes at 0x04, which is the next 4-byte segment, and store the 2 bytes at 0x04 and 0x05 in the register.

Address |0x00|0x01|0x02|0x03|0x04|0x05|0x06|0x07|
Value   | 12 | 34 | 56 | 78 | 90 | AB | CD | EF |
Load 2                      | **   **           |
------------------------------------------------------
r0: 56 78 90 AB

As you can see, each time you want to access the value at 0x02, the processor actually has to split your instruction into two operations. However, if you instead wanted to access the value at 0x04, the processor can do it in a single operation:

Address |0x00|0x01|0x02|0x03|0x04|0x05|0x06|0x07|
Value   | 12 | 34 | 56 | 78 | 90 | AB | CD | EF |
Load 1                      | **   **   **   ** |
------------------------------------------------------
r0: 90 AB CD EF

In your example, with both flags1 and flags2 commented out, your struct's size is 15. This means that every second struct in your array is going to be at an odd address, so none of it's pointer or long members are going to be aligned correctly.

By introducing one of the flags variables, your struct's size increases to 16, which is a multiple of 4. This ensures that all of your structs begin on a 4-byte boundary, so you likely won't run into alignment issues.


There's likely a compiler flag that can help you with this, but in general, it's good to be aware of the layout of your structures. Alignment is a tricky issue to deal with, and only compilers that conform to the current standards have well defined behavior.

  • Thanks for the explanation. This helps me understand things better. However, there's still something that doesn't quite make sense: With both flags commented out, the struct size is 15. The run-time is 133us. As I uncomment the flags the run-time goes from 133us-->158us-->133us, while the struct size goes from 15-->16-->17 bytes. So, the slowest run-time is when it is 16 bytes, not the fastest. That doesn't make much sense to me....You mention also that there is likely a compiler flag that can help me w/this. If you can help me find this flag I'll mark the answer solved. – Gabriel Staples May 6 '15 at 1:49
  • ...At this point, what I'm looking for most is consistency and predictability, and second is speed. I want to know that when I hand out the library to others I can guarantee it will perform predictably, at some given max PWM speed. Another question: can the code NOT in the struct, but rather, before and after it, affect the struct's alignment? It seems to me the answer would be yes, which makes it even more important to me that I can force the data in the struct to align with boundaries and be more predictable, even at the cost of memory. – Gabriel Staples May 6 '15 at 1:53
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    I'm not sure if I'm interpreting your dis-assembly correctly, but it looks like your array is located at an odd address with Os, meaning the 16-byte struct would never be correctly aligned, while the 15-byte struct would make some elements be aligned. Your compiler seems to be off in no-man's land, doing whatever it wants, so I can't help much there. – Collin Dauphinee May 6 '15 at 2:53
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    As a side note, it makes sense that Os would do this; you're telling to to sacrifice speed for size. If you're worried about speed, just stick with O2 or O3. – Collin Dauphinee May 6 '15 at 2:56
  • Good point about changing the global optimization level. The problem is that I'm using the Arduino IDE, writing libraries intended for other beginners (like I was/in some ways still am), who use the Arduino IDE. To change the optimization level in the Arduino IDE you have to manually open up a configuration file, change it, save the file, and close and re-open the IDE. This is more than I'd like to make people do for this IDE, but I may have found a work-around using #pragma GCC optimize ("string"...) – Gabriel Staples May 6 '15 at 3:17

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