15

Note: see update at the bottom of the question for what I eventually concluded.

I need to send multiple responses to a request over the web socket that sent the request message, the first one quickly, and the others after the data is verified (somewhere between 10 and 60 seconds later, from multiple parallel threads).

I am having trouble getting the later responses to stop broadcasting over all open web sockets. How do I get them to only send to the initial web socket? Or should I use something besides Spring STOMP (because, to be honest, all I want is the message routing to various functions, I don't need or want the ability to broadcast to other web sockets, so I suspect I could write the message distributor myself, even though it is reinventing the wheel).

I am not using Spring Authentication (this is being retrofitted into legacy code).

On the initial return message, I can use @SendToUser, and even though we don't have a user, Spring only sends the return value to the websocket that sent the message. (see this question).

With the slower responses, though, I think I need to use SimpMessagingTemplate.convertAndSendToUser(user, destination, message), but I can't, because I have to pass in the user, and I can't figure out what user the @SendToUser used. I tried to follow the steps in this question, but didn't get it to work when not authenticated (principal.getName() returns null in this case).

I've simplified this considerably for the prototype, so don't worry about synchronizing threads or anything. I just want the web sockets to work correctly.

Here is my controller:

@Controller
public class TestSocketController
{
  private SimpMessagingTemplate template;

  @Autowired
  public TestSocketController(SimpMessagingTemplate template)
  {
    this.template = template;
  }

  // This doesn't work because I need to pass something for the first parameter.
  // If I just use convertAndSend, it broacasts the response to all browsers
  void setResults(String ret)
  {
    template.convertAndSendToUser("", "/user/topic/testwsresponse", ret);
  }

  // this only sends "Testing Return" to the browser tab hooked to this websocket
  @MessageMapping(value="/testws")
  @SendToUser("/topic/testwsresponse")
  public String handleTestWS(String msg) throws InterruptedException
  {
    (new Thread(new Later(this))).start();
    return "Testing Return";
  }

  public class Later implements Runnable
  {
    TestSocketController Controller;
    public Later(TestSocketController controller)
    {
        Controller = controller;
    }

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            java.lang.Thread.sleep(2000);

            Controller.setResults("Testing Later Return");
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
    }
  }
}

For the record, here is the browser side:

var client = null;
function sendMessage()
{
    client.send('/app/testws', {}, 'Test');
}

// hooked to a button
function test()
{
    if (client != null)
    {
        sendMessage();
        return;
    }

    var socket = new SockJS('/application-name/sendws/');
    client = Stomp.over(socket);
    client.connect({}, function(frame)
    {
        client.subscribe('/user/topic/testwsresponse', function(message)
        {
            alert(message);
        });

        sendMessage();
    });
});

And here is the config:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSocketMessageBroker
public class TestSocketConfig extends AbstractWebSocketMessageBrokerConfigurer
{
    @Override
    public void configureMessageBroker(MessageBrokerRegistry config)
    {
        config.setApplicationDestinationPrefixes("/app");
        config.enableSimpleBroker("/queue", "/topic");
        config.setUserDestinationPrefix("/user");
    }

    @Override
    public void registerStompEndpoints(StompEndpointRegistry registry)
    {
        registry.addEndpoint("/sendws").withSockJS();
    }
}

UPDATE: Due to the security issues involved with the possibility of information being sent over other websockets than the originating socket, I ended up recommending to my group that we do not use the Spring 4.0 implementation of STOMP over Web Sockets. I understand why the Spring team did it the way they did it, and it is more power then we needed, but the security restrictions on our project were severe enough, and the actual requirements were simple enough, that we decided to go a different way. That doesn't invalidate the answers below, so make your own decision based on your projects needs. At least we have hopefully all learned the limitations of the technology, for good or bad.

6
+50

Why don't you use a separate topic for each client?

  1. Client generates a session id.

    var sessionId = Math.random().toString(36).substring(7);

  2. Client subscribes to /topic/testwsresponse/{sessionId}, then sends a message to '/app/testws/{sessionId}'.

  3. In your controller you use @MessageMapping(value="/testws/{sessionId}") and remove @SendToUser. You can use @DestinationVariable to access sessionId in your method.
  4. The controller sends further responses to /topic/testwsresponse/{sessionId}.

Essentially Spring does a similar thing internally when you use user destinations. Since you don't use Spring Authentication you cannot rely on this mechanism but you can easily implement your own as I described above.

var client = null;
var sessionId = Math.random().toString(36).substring(7);
function sendMessage()
{
    client.send('/app/testws/' + sessionId, {}, 'Test');
}

// hooked to a button
function test()
{
    if (client != null)
    {
        sendMessage();
        return;
    }

    var socket = new SockJS('/application-name/sendws/');
    client = Stomp.over(socket);
    client.connect({}, function(frame)
    {
        client.subscribe('/topic/testwsresponse/' + sessionId, function(message)
        {
            alert(message);
        });

        // Need to wait until subscription is complete
        setTimeout(sendMessage, 1000);
    });
}); 

Controller:

@Controller
public class TestSocketController
{
    private SimpMessagingTemplate template;

    @Autowired
    public TestSocketController(SimpMessagingTemplate template)
    {
        this.template = template;
    }

    void setResults(String ret, String sessionId)
    {
        template.convertAndSend("/topic/testwsresponse/" + sessionId, ret);
    }

    @MessageMapping(value="/testws/{sessionId}")
    public void handleTestWS(@DestinationVariable String sessionId, @Payload String msg) throws InterruptedException
    {
        (new Thread(new Later(this, sessionId))).start();
        setResults("Testing Return", sessionId);
    }

    public class Later implements Runnable
    {
        TestSocketController Controller;
        String sessionId;
        public Later(TestSocketController controller, String sessionId)
        {
            Controller = controller;
            this.sessionId = sessionId;
        }

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                java.lang.Thread.sleep(2000);

                Controller.setResults("Testing Later Return", sessionId);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
            }
        }
    }
}

Just tested it, works as expected.

  • I have a few security problems with this. The first is that someone could possibly find out what random string someone else is using and listen to the conversation. The second is that someone could could register for some (or all, perhaps) of the potential strings and listen to all the responses. Even getting lucky and listening to one other persons response is not secure enough for this project. I really need to only send the message over a single web socket, and I'm starting to think that the Spring implementation of STOMP won't do that.. – Guy Schalnat May 11 '15 at 14:36
  • You should not be concerned about the security. Just use a sufficiently long random string or use UUID for session id. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… Basically the hacker will need 17 billion years on average to break your system. – medvedev1088 May 11 '15 at 14:45
  • It is more likely that I will guess your gmail password than the hacker will guess the random session id. – medvedev1088 May 11 '15 at 14:50
  • Yes, but what if they could find out a person's session id somehow? I haven't thought it through completely, but I'm afraid that, with all the data hacking that is been going on, I do have to be concerned about security. – Guy Schalnat May 11 '15 at 14:54
  • I agree with you. But security problem has nothing to do with the solution that I provided (the question was about preventing message broadcasting). Security is a separate concern. Having said that you only need to make the session id sufficiently long and the solution will be perfectly secure even without any other authentication mechanism, as long as you use WSS (WebSocket secure: WS over TLS) – medvedev1088 May 11 '15 at 15:05
0

This is not full answer. Just general consideration and suggestion. You cannot do different stuff or type of connection via the same socket. Why not have different sockets for different work? Some with authentication and some without. Some for quick task and some for long execution.

  • Because, behind the scenes, the request kicks off separate threads to do the longer lasting jobs, and I won't be able to easily talk to those threads again if I close the first connection. What I have now is the threads writing stuff to the database and ajax calls pulling any one of the web servers in the farm every few seconds, which read the database and see if anything finished. By using one web socket that says open, I lock it down to one server (for a little bit of time), and give the threads the ability to respond directly, without the database being involved. – Guy Schalnat May 11 '15 at 14:48

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