348

How can I view my HTML code in a browser with the new Microsoft Visual Studio Code?

With Notepad++ you have the option to Run in a browser. How can I do the same thing with Visual Studio Code?

5

27 Answers 27

241

For Windows - Open your Default Browser - Tested on VS Code v 1.1.0

Answer to both opening a specific file (name is hard-coded) OR opening ANY other file.

Steps:

  1. Use ctrl + shift + p (or F1) to open the Command Palette.

  2. Type in Tasks: Configure Task or on older versions Configure Task Runner. Selecting it will open the tasks.json file. Delete the script displayed and replace it by the following:

    {
        "version": "0.1.0",
        "command": "explorer",    
        "windows": {
            "command": "explorer.exe"
        },
        "args": ["test.html"]
    }
    

    Remember to change the "args" section of the tasks.json file to the name of your file. This will always open that specific file when you hit F5.

    You may also set the this to open whichever file you have open at the time by using ["${file}"] as the value for "args". Note that the $ goes outside the {...}, so ["{$file}"] is incorrect.

  3. Save the file.

  4. Switch back to your html file (in this example it's "text.html"), and press ctrl + shift + b to view your page in your Web Browser.

enter image description here

20
  • 17
    You can even use variables if you have more than one HTML file. You can do: "args": ["{$file}"] to pass the current open file. See also code.visualstudio.com/Docs/tasks#_variables-in-tasksjson May 7 '15 at 7:04
  • 9
    How do I do it in Mac? There are no exe files. I would like to open the webpage in chrome on Mac Jun 29 '15 at 6:25
  • 3
    just getting "Failed to launch external program chrome {$file}. spawn chrome ENOENT"
    – johny why
    Jan 2 '16 at 21:49
  • 8
    To Configure Task in a new folder: Select the Tasks: Configure Task Runner command and you will see a list of task runner templates. Select Others to create a task which runs an external command. . . . You should now see a tasks.json file in your workspace .vscode folder with the following content: . . . by code.visualstudio.com/Docs/editor/tasks Sep 25 '16 at 2:12
  • 5
    Configure Task Runner is no longer present in VSC 1.24.0 - Control-Shift-P returns no results for that string.
    – lonstar
    Jun 9 '18 at 5:47
169

VS Code has a Live Server Extention that support one click launch from status bar.

Some of the features:

  • One Click Launch from Status Bar
  • Live Reload
  • Support for Chrome Debugging Attachment

enter image description here

10
  • 8
    This extension also has a web add-on to provide automatic reload functionality to dynamic pages. Apr 24 '18 at 13:01
  • @M.Sundstrom can you give me the name/link of that add-on please?
    – Adil Saju
    Oct 10 '18 at 12:13
  • 2
    Still very useful, and especially completely configuration free!
    – Jonas
    Oct 11 '18 at 9:39
  • 2
    This is not recommended for complex pages maybe good for new coders Nov 11 '18 at 1:15
  • 1
    but it seems you can't preview the unsaved active file right? (Running it, doesn't preview the html, but shows on the browser the folder hierarchy)
    – JinSnow
    Jun 13 '19 at 19:28
80

@InvisibleDev - to get this working on a mac trying using this:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "Chrome",
    "osx": {
        "command": "/Applications/Google Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google Chrome"
    },
    "args": [
        "${file}"
    ]
}

If you have chrome already open, it will launch your html file in a new tab.

0
38
  1. Open Extensions Sidebar (Ctrl + Shift + X)

  2. Search for open in browser and install it

    Ext > Open in Browser

  3. Right click on your html file, and select "Open in Browser" (Alt + B)

    Context Menu> Open in Browser

2
  • 2
    Works great in Windows.
    – Timo
    Dec 5 '20 at 18:03
  • Works for mac too. You just need to use Cmd + Shift + X and then the rest is the same.
    – Matt Croak
    Jul 29 '21 at 15:22
32

If you would like to have live reload you can use gulp-webserver, which will watch for your file changes and reload page, this way you don't have to press F5 every time on your page:

Here is how to do it:

  • Open command prompt (cmd) and type

    npm install --save-dev gulp-webserver

  • Enter Ctrl+Shift+P in VS Code and type Configure Task Runner. Select it and press enter. It will open tasks.json file for you. Remove everything from it end enter just following code

tasks.json

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "gulp",
    "isShellCommand": true,
    "args": [
        "--no-color"
    ],
    "tasks": [
        {
            "taskName": "webserver",
            "isBuildCommand": true,
            "showOutput": "always"
        }
    ]
}
  • In the root directory of your project add gulpfile.js and enter following code:

gulpfile.js

var gulp = require('gulp'),
    webserver = require('gulp-webserver');

gulp.task('webserver', function () {
    gulp.src('app')
        .pipe(webserver({
            livereload: true,
            open: true
        }));
});
  • Now in VS Code enter Ctrl+Shift+P and type "Run Task" when you enter it you will see your task "webserver" selected and press enter.

Your webserver now will open your page in your default browser. Now any changes that you will do to your HTML or CSS pages will be automatically reloaded.

Here is an information on how to configure 'gulp-webserver' for instance port, and what page to load, ...

You can also run your task just by entering Ctrl+P and type task webserver

5
  • 2
    I had to run npm install -g gulp, npm install -g gulp-webserver and add a NODE_PATH environment variable that points to my AppData\npm\node_modules. Then I was able to run the webserver task, however I get a 404 when the browser starts. Any idea what I'm missing? Aug 25 '16 at 23:36
  • 2
    Never mind, just had to change the 'app' in your example to '.' (so it serves from the current directory). Aug 25 '16 at 23:46
  • 1
    One comment to the answer: If you want to run an html file in yor browser, which will automatic reload on changes, your gulpfile.js should look like this, with a '.' instead of the 'app'. Code = var gulp = require('gulp'), webserver = require('gulp-webserver'); gulp.task('webserver', function () { gulp.src('.') .pipe(webserver({ fallback: 'index.html', livereload: true, open: true })); });
    – Friis1978
    Jan 27 '17 at 10:43
  • 1
    This is awesome. Thanks for explaining this as a valuable option. I also had apply a little bit of both Krill and Friis's answers to get this working. But it does!
    – klewis
    May 15 '17 at 16:07
  • I was getting "Cannot GET /" because I copypasted gulpfile.js without configuring the line gulp.src('app') so that it actually pointed to my source (which wasn't /app but '.'). Works perfect. Thanks!
    – user1228
    Sep 7 '17 at 15:54
29

You can now install an extension View In Browser. I tested it on windows with chrome and it is working.

vscode version: 1.10.2

enter image description here

2
  • 9
    That extension gets horrible reviews. Apr 29 '17 at 17:25
  • This doesn't automatically refresh the browser and this is not what OP is looking for May 25 '17 at 9:20
21

Here is a 2.0.0 version for the current document in Chrome w/ keyboard shortcut:

tasks.json

{
    "version": "2.0.0",
    "tasks": [
        {
            "label": "Chrome",
            "type": "process",
            "command": "chrome.exe",
            "windows": {
                "command": "C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Google\\Chrome\\Application\\chrome.exe"
            },
            "args": [
                "${file}"
            ],
            "problemMatcher": []
        }
    ]
}

keybindings.json :

{
    "key": "ctrl+g",
    "command": "workbench.action.tasks.runTask",
    "args": "Chrome"
}

For running on a webserver:

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ritwickdey.LiveServer

0
20

VS Code Settings Gear wheel icon

Click on this Left-Bottom Manage Icon. Click Extensions or Short Cut Ctrl+Shift+X

Then Search in Extension with this key sentence Open In Default Browser. You will find this Extension. It is better to me.

Now right click on the html file and you will see Open in Default Browser or Short Cut Ctrl+1 to see the html file in browser.

1
  • The shortcut ctrl+1 overwrites the default ctrl+1 intelligently, opening a browser when in html in explorer, otherwise it sets the cursor in the current editor.
    – Timo
    May 15 '21 at 10:14
19

In linux, you can use the xdg-open command to open the file with the default browser:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "linux": {
        "command": "xdg-open"
    },
    "isShellCommand": true,
    "showOutput": "never",
    "args": ["${file}"]
}
3
  • 6
    Thanks! I'm a Linux user and was feeling lost. I'd like to add that one needs to press Ctrl + Shift + b to launch it in the browser. For me, the mnemonic was "b = browser". :-)
    – ankush981
    Mar 3 '17 at 4:34
  • It works but seems deprecated, if you have an updated version, thank you
    – Bruno L.
    Mar 9 '19 at 3:19
  • Can you leave the version entry here in the tasks.json?
    – Timo
    Jan 2 '21 at 17:00
13

I am just re-posting the steps I used from msdn blog. It may help the community.

This will help you to setup a local web server known as lite-server with VS Code, and also guides you to host your static html files in localhost and debug your Javascript code.

1. Install Node.js

If not already installed, get it here

It comes with npm (the package manager for acquiring and managing your development libraries)

2. Create a new folder for your project

Somewhere in your drive, create a new folder for your web app.

3. Add a package.json file to the project folder

Then copy/paste the following text:

{
   "name": "Demo",
   "version": "1.0.0",
   "description": "demo project.",
   "scripts": {
     "lite": "lite-server --port 10001",
     "start": "npm run lite"
   },
   "author": "",
   "license": "ISC",
   "devDependencies": {
     "lite-server": "^2.5.4"
   }
}

4. Install the web server

In a terminal window (command prompt in Windows) opened on your project folder, run this command:

npm install

This will install lite-server (defined in package.json), a static server that loads index.html in your default browser and auto refreshes it when application files change.

5. Start the local web server!

(Assuming you have an index.html file in your project folder).

In the same terminal window (command prompt in Windows) run this command:

npm start

Wait a second and index.html is loaded and displayed in your default browser served by your local web server!

lite-server is watching your files and refreshes the page as soon as you make changes to any html, js or css files.

And if you have VS Code configured to auto save (menu File / Auto Save), you see changes in the browser as you type!

Notes:

  • Do not close the command line prompt until you’re done coding in your app for the day
  • It opens on http://localhost:10001 but you can change the port by editing the package.json file.

That’s it. Now before any coding session just type npm start and you are good to go!

Originally posted here in msdn blog. Credits goes to Author : @Laurent Duveau

6

If you're just on Mac this tasks.json file:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "open",
    "args": ["${file}"],
}

...is all you need to open the current file in Safari, assuming its extension is ".html".

Create tasks.json as described above and invoke it with +shift+b.

If you want it to open in Chrome then:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "open",
    "args": ["-a", "Chrome.app", "${file}"],
}

This will do what you want, as in opening in a new tab if the app is already open.

5

For Mac - Opens in Chrome - Tested on VS Code v 1.9.0

  1. Use Command + shift + p to open the Command Palette.

enter image description here

  1. Type in Configure Task Runner, the first time you do this, VS Code will give you the scroll down menu, if it does select "Other." If you have done this before, VS Code will just send you directly to tasks.json.

  2. Once in the tasks.json file. Delete the script displayed and replace it by the following:

{
    "version": "0.1.0",
    "command": "Chrome",
    "osx": {
        "command": "/Applications/Google Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google Chrome"
    },
    "args": ["${file}"]
}
  1. Switch back to your html file and press Command + Shift + b to view your page in Chrome.
5

One click solution simply install open-in-browser Extensions from the Visual Studio marketplace.

3

There's now an official extension from the VS Code team called "Live Preview"

Quick setup:

  1. Install "Live Preview" extension from Microsoft.
  2. Open a html file from the workspace, files outside current workspace don't work.
  3. Run command > Live Preview: Show Preview (External Browser)

There's also a command for launching it in the internal browser. You might also need to change the default port from the extension settings in case it's already in use on your system.

Documentation: https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=ms-vscode.live-server

Release notes: https://code.visualstudio.com/updates/v1_59#_live-preview

2

CTRL+SHIFT+P will bring up the command palette.
Depending on what you're running of course. Example in an ASP.net app you can type in:
>kestrel and then open up your web browser and type in localhost:(your port here).

If you type in > it will show you the show and run commands

Or in your case with HTML, I think F5 after opening the command palette should open the debugger.

Source: link

1
2

Openning files in Opera browser (on Windows 64 bits). Just add this lines:

{
"version": "0.1.0",
"command": "opera",
"windows": {
    "command": "///Program Files (x86)/Opera/launcher.exe"
},
"args": ["${file}"] }

Pay attention to the path format on "command": line. Don't use the "C:\path_to_exe\runme.exe" format.

To run this task, open the html file you want to view, press F1, type task opera and press enter

2

my runner script looks like :

{
    "version": "0.1.0",

    "command": "explorer",

    "windows": {
        "command": "explorer.exe"
    },

    "args": ["{$file}"]
}

and it's just open my explorer when I press ctrl shift b in my index.html file

2

here is how you can run it in multiple browsers for windows

{
 "version": "0.1.0",
 "command": "cmd",
 "args": ["/C"],
 "isShellCommand": true,
 "showOutput": "always",
 "suppressTaskName": true,
 "tasks": [
     {   
         "taskName": "Chrome",
         "args": ["start chrome -incognito \"${file}\""]
     },
     {   
         "taskName": "Firefox",
         "args": ["start firefox -private-window \"${file}\""]
     },
     {   
         "taskName": "Edge",
         "args": ["${file}"]
     }   
    ]
}

notice that I didn't type anything in args for edge because Edge is my default browser just gave it the name of the file.

EDIT: also you don't need -incognito nor -private-window...it's just me I like to view it in a private window

1
  • I was copying only the tasks part. the "args":["/C"] is what makes this work. Out of curiosity, what does this do?
    – Ryan B
    Jul 4 '17 at 2:44
0

Here is the version 2.0.0 for Mac OSx:

{
  // See https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=733558
  // for the documentation about the tasks.json format
  "version": "2.0.0",
  "tasks": [
    {
      "label": "echo",
      "type": "shell",
      "command": "echo Hello"
    },
    {
      "label":"chrome",
      "type":"process",
      "command":"/Applications/Google Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google Chrome",
      "args": [
        "${file}"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
0

For Mac, set your tasks.json (in the .vscode folder) file contents to the following and use SHFT+COMMAND+B to open.

{
    "version": "2.0.0",
    "tasks": [
        {
            "label": "Chrome Preview",
            "type": "shell",
            "command": "open -a /Applications/Google\\ Chrome.app test.html",
            "problemMatcher": [],
            "group": {
                "kind": "build",
                "isDefault": true
            }
        }
    ]
}
0

Following worked in version 1.53.2 on windows 10 ->

  • choose run active file in terminal menu
  • It executed the html file in default edge browser
-1

Ctrl + F1 will open the default browser. alternatively you can hit Ctrl + shift + P to open command window and select "View in Browser". The html code must be saved in a file (unsaved code on the editor - without extension, doesn't work)

2
  • 1
    What version of Visual Studio Code are you using? Those commands aren't working in my just-updated 1.8.1. Ctrl+F1 does nothing and I don't have a View in Browser option in the command palette. Maybe you have something beyond the default installed or extra tasks in your tasks.json?
    – jla
    Dec 20 '16 at 17:40
  • I have the same version but I realized I installed an extension for it. It is: marketplace.visualstudio.com/…
    – PersyJack
    Jan 3 '17 at 14:01
-1

probably most will be able to find a solution from the above answers but seeing as how none worked for me (vscode v1.34) i thought i'd share my experience. if at least one person finds it helpful then, cool not a wasted post, amiirte?


anyway, my solution (windows) is built a-top of @noontz's. his configuration may have been sufficient for older versions of vscode but not with 1.34 (at least, i couldn't get it working ..).

our configs are nearly identical save a single property -- that property being, the group property. i'm not sure why but without this, my task would not even appear in the command palette.

so. a working tasks.json for windows users running vscode 1.34:

{
    "version": "2.0.0",
    "tasks": [
        {
            "label": "Chrome",
            "type": "process",
            "command": "chrome.exe",
            "windows": {
                "command": "C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Google\\Chrome\\Application\\chrome.exe"
            },
            "args": [
                "${file}"
            ],
            "group": "build",
            "problemMatcher": []
        }
    ]
}

note that the problemMatcher property is not required for this to work but without it an extra manual step is imposed on you. tried to read the docs on this property but i'm too thick to understand. hopefully someone will come about and school me but yeah, thanks in advance for that. all i know is -- include this property and ctrl+shift+b opens the current html file in a new chrome tab, hassle free.


easy.

-1

Open custom Chrome with URL from prompt

{
  "version": "2.0.0",
  "tasks": [
    {
      "label": "Open Chrome",
      "type": "process",
      "windows": {
        "command": "${config:chrome.executable}"
      },
      "args": ["--user-data-dir=${config:chrome.profileDir}", "${input:url}"],
      "problemMatcher": []
    }
  ],
  "inputs": [
    {
      "id": "url",
      "description": "Which URL?",
      "default": "http://localhost:8080",
      "type": "promptString"
    }
  ]
}

Open custom Chrome with active file

{
  "label": "Open active file in Chrome",
  "type": "process",
  "command": "chrome.exe",
  "windows": {
    "command": "${config:chrome.executable}"
  },
  "args": ["--user-data-dir=${config:chrome.profileDir}", "${file}"],
  "problemMatcher": []
},

Notes

  • if necessary, replace windows property by other OS
  • replace ${config:chrome.executable} with your custom chrome location, e.g. "C:/Program Files (x86)/Google/Chrome/Application/chrome.exe"
  • replace ${config:chrome.profileDir} with your custome chrome profile directory, e.g. "C:/My/Data/chrome/profile" or leave it out
  • You can keep the variables like above if you want. To do so, add following entries in settings.json - user or workspace - , adjust paths to your needs:
"chrome.executable": "C:/Program Files (x86)/Google/Chrome/Application/chrome.exe",
"chrome.profileDir": "C:/My/Data/chrome/profile"
  • You could re-use these variables e.g. in launch.json for debugging purposes: "runtimeExecutable": "${config:chrome.executable}"
-1

VSCode Task - Open by App bundle identifier (macOS only).

{
  "version": "2.0.0",
  "tasks": [
    {
      "label": "Open In: Firefox DE",
      "type": "process",
      "command": "open",
      "args": ["-b", "org.mozilla.firefoxdeveloperedition", "${file}"],
      "group": "build",
      "problemMatcher": [],
      "presentation": {
        "panel": "shared",
        "focus": false,
        "clear": true,
        "reveal": "never",
      }
    }
  ]
}
-1

Start the local web server!

(Assuming you have an index.html file in your project folder).

In the same terminal window (command prompt in Windows) run this command:

npm start

-1

Recently came across this feature in one of the visual studio code tutorial in www.lynda.com

Press Ctrl + K followed by M, it will open the "Select Language Mode" ( or click on the right hand bottom corner that says HTML before that smiley ), type markdown and press enter

Now Press Ctrl + K followed by V, it will open your html in a near by tab.

Tadaaa !!!

Now emmet commands were not working in this mode in my html file, so I went back to the original state ( note - html tag tellisense were working perfectly )

To go to original state - Press Ctrl + K followed by M, select auto-detect. emmet commands started to work. If you are happy with html only viewer, then there is no need for you to come back to the original state.

Wonder why vscode is not having html viewer option by default, when it is able to dispaly the html file in the markdown mode.

1
  • 2
    The question is about how to view in a browser. May 7 '18 at 16:06