561

For Visual Studio 2010 Web based application we have Config Transformation features by which we can maintain multiple configuration files for different environments. But the same feature is not available for App.Config files for Windows Services/WinForms or Console Application.

There is a workaround available as suggested here: Applying XDT magic to App.Config.

However it is not straightforward and requires a number of steps. Is there an easier way to achieve the same for app.config files?

1

14 Answers 14

601

I tried several solutions and here is the simplest I personally found.
Dan pointed out in the comments that the original post belongs to Oleg Sychthanks, Oleg!

Here are the instructions:

1. Add an XML file for each configuration to the project.

Typically you will have Debug and Release configurations so name your files App.Debug.config and App.Release.config. In my project, I created a configuration for each kind of environment, so you might want to experiment with that.

2. Unload project and open .csproj file for editing

Visual Studio allows you to edit .csproj files right in the editor—you just need to unload the project first. Then right-click on it and select Edit <ProjectName>.csproj.

3. Bind App.*.config files to main App.config

Find the project file section that contains all App.config and App.*.config references. You'll notice their build actions are set to None and that's okay:

<None Include="App.config" />
<None Include="App.Debug.config" />
<None Include="App.Release.config" />

Next, make all configuration-specific files dependant on the main App.config so Visual Studio groups them like it does designer and code-behind files.

Replace XML above with the one below:

<None Include="App.config" />
<None Include="App.Debug.config" >
  <DependentUpon>App.config</DependentUpon>
</None>
<None Include="App.Release.config" >
  <DependentUpon>App.config</DependentUpon>
</None>

4. Activate transformations magic (still necessary for Visual Studio versions such as VS2019)

In the end of file after

<Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" />

and before final

</Project>

insert the following XML -- please note there are two steps for the proper transformation to occur:

  <UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll" />
  <Target Name="BeforeBuild" Condition="Exists('App.$(Configuration).config')">
    <!-- Generate transformed app config and replace it: will get the <runtime> node and assembly bindings properly populated -->
    <TransformXml Source="App.config" Destination="App.config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" />
  </Target>
  <Target Name="AfterBuild" Condition="Exists('App.$(Configuration).config')">
    <!-- Generate transformed app config in the intermediate directory: this will transform sections such as appSettings -->
    <TransformXml Source="App.config" Destination="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" />
    <!-- Force build process to use the transformed configuration file from now on.-->
    <ItemGroup>
      <AppConfigWithTargetPath Remove="App.config" />
      <AppConfigWithTargetPath Include="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).config">
        <TargetPath>$(TargetFileName).config</TargetPath>
      </AppConfigWithTargetPath>
    </ItemGroup>
  </Target>

Now you can reload the project, build it and enjoy App.config transformations!

FYI

Make sure that your App.*.config files have the right setup like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">
     <!--magic transformations here-->
</configuration>
42
  • 8
    One problem with this approach is that when you look over at the "Publish" tab in the project properties, and then click on the "Application Files" button... you'll notice that app.config, app.Debug.config, app.Release.config are forced to be deployed as part of the Publish process. Sure, you get the correct MyApp.exe.config file too, but I don't want that extra baggage getting deployed. There needs to be a way to keep the app.*.config files in the project as <None> instead of <Content>. Nov 1 '11 at 18:07
  • 5
    In Target name, AfterCompile didn't work for me, AfterBuild did.
    – nakhli
    Apr 9 '12 at 19:43
  • 6
    The one problem this is leaving out for some is the answer originally taken from Oleg Sych leaves out a key piece. If in your individual app.(env).configs you DO NOT list '<configuration xmlns:xdt="schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">' and something like <appSettings xdt:Transform="Replace"> or attributes that do similar things on the setting lines, it will not work. This last bit of information is key and once I added it, poof it all started working.
    – djangojazz
    Oct 9 '15 at 16:57
  • 25
    You could replace v10.0 with v$(VisualStudioVersion) to make sure your project does work with all later versions of VS. May 11 '16 at 9:06
  • 19
    I had an error MSBuild error MSB3021: Unable to copy file. Could not find file 'obj\Release\ConsoleApp.exe' during the build. So I change a bit the solution to reuse target <Target Name="AfterBuild"> section instead of creating a new like in the solution
    – asidis
    Oct 5 '18 at 5:25
420

This works now with the Visual Studio AddIn treated in this article: SlowCheetah - Web.config Transformation Syntax now generalized for any XML configuration file.

You can right-click on your web.config and click "Add Config Transforms." When you do this, you'll get a web.debug.config and a web.release.config. You can make a web.whatever.config if you like, as long as the name lines up with a configuration profile. These files are just the changes you want made, not a complete copy of your web.config.

You might think you'd want to use XSLT to transform a web.config, but while they feels intuitively right it's actually very verbose.

Here's two transforms, one using XSLT and the same one using the XML Document Transform syntax/namespace. As with all things there's multiple ways in XSLT to do this, but you get the general idea. XSLT is a generalized tree transformation language, while this deployment one is optimized for a specific subset of common scenarios. But, the cool part is that each XDT transform is a .NET plugin, so you can make your own.

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
  <xsl:copy>           
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>
<xsl:template match="/configuration/appSettings">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
    <xsl:element name="add">
      <xsl:attribute name="key">NewSetting</xsl:attribute>
      <xsl:attribute name="value">New Setting Value</xsl:attribute>
    </xsl:element>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Or the same thing via the deployment transform:

<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">
   <appSettings>
      <add name="NewSetting" value="New Setting Value" xdt:Transform="Insert"/>
   </appSettings>
</configuration>
7
  • Oh that is sweet! Have an app with numerous config files (log4net, nHibernate, web.config) and remembering to change them all was a bit of a pain. I was not looking forward to moving the code into CruiseControl.NET either but looks like that's a breeze too. Jun 19 '12 at 9:42
  • 10
    FYI, SlowCheetah was a fantastic extension that will now be unsupported after VS 2014. Per the author, Sayed Ibrahim Hashimi, sedodream.com/2014/08/11/….
    – bdeem
    Oct 1 '14 at 14:30
  • 5
    @andrewb, I read that here; however, that was a year ago. After revisiting the thread, and reading the comments, looks like someone has provided a version that works with VS2015 here.
    – Anil Natha
    Feb 14 '16 at 22:35
  • 2
    Working perfectly with Visual Studio 2017 and Visual STudio 2019 May 31 '19 at 11:44
  • 1
    It's here now Nov 6 '19 at 17:50
141

Another solution I've found is NOT to use the transformations but just have a separate config file, e.g. app.Release.config. Then add this line to your csproj file.

  <PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x86' ">
    <AppConfig>App.Release.config</AppConfig>
  </PropertyGroup>

This will not only generate the right myprogram.exe.config file but if you're using Setup and Deployment Project in Visual Studio to generate MSI, it'll force the deployment project to use the correct config file when packaging.

8
  • 6
    The untold wonders of MSBuild. Now I wonder what else is possible. Btw. this works also for clickonce deployments directly from VS (in contrast to higher-voted answers).
    – Boris B.
    Jul 15 '13 at 14:05
  • 5
    Changes can become onerous and error prone if the configs contain many entries that are the SAME for all builds. Dealing with an issue right now where one environment's .config missed a change, and of course it was production.
    – jeepwran
    Feb 23 '15 at 16:26
  • 1
    Having two copies of config file is not a problem, as long as developers are not the ones who manually maintain it.
    – anIBMer
    Aug 26 '15 at 13:00
  • 1
    This is beautiful, works like a charm! I pasted just the <AppConfig>App.Release.config</AppConfig> line inside the existing <PropertyGroup condition for the Release configuration and the IDE showed a squiggly line below the <AppConfig>... line saying it was not in the schema or something, but I saved the file anyways and reloaded the project file and did a build in Release config and it worked!
    – Shiva
    Nov 3 '16 at 18:25
  • 1
    With this, you will lose functionality of settings designer.
    – Ondřej
    Apr 10 '17 at 18:32
36

Inspired by Oleg and others in this question, I took the solution https://stackoverflow.com/a/5109530/2286801 a step further to enable the following.

  • Works with ClickOnce
  • Works with Setup and Deployment projects in VS 2010
  • Works with VS2010, 2013, 2015 (didn't test 2012 although should work as well).
  • Works with Team Build. (You must install either A) Visual Studio or B) Microsoft.Web.Publishing.targets and Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll)

This solution works by performing the app.config transformation before the app.config is referenced for the first time in the MSBuild process. It uses an external targets file for easier management across multiple projects.

Instructions:

Similar steps to the other solution. I've quoted what remains the same and included it for completeness and easier comparison.

0. Add a new file to your project called AppConfigTransformation.targets

<Project xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <!-- Transform the app config per project configuration.-->
  <PropertyGroup>
    <!-- This ensures compatibility across multiple versions of Visual Studio when using a solution file.
         However, when using MSBuild directly you may need to override this property to 11.0 or 12.0 
         accordingly as part of the MSBuild script, ie /p:VisualStudioVersion=11.0;
         See http://blogs.msdn.com/b/webdev/archive/2012/08/22/visual-studio-project-compatability-and-visualstudioversion.aspx -->
    <VisualStudioVersion Condition="'$(VisualStudioVersion)' == ''">10.0</VisualStudioVersion>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.targets" />

  <Target Name="SetTransformAppConfigDestination" BeforeTargets="PrepareForBuild" 
          Condition="exists('app.$(Configuration).config')">
    <PropertyGroup>
      <!-- Force build process to use the transformed configuration file from now on. -->
      <AppConfig>$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).config</AppConfig>
    </PropertyGroup>
    <Message Text="AppConfig transformation destination: = $(AppConfig)" />
  </Target>

  <!-- Transform the app.config after the prepare for build completes. -->
  <Target Name="TransformAppConfig" AfterTargets="PrepareForBuild" Condition="exists('app.$(Configuration).config')">
    <!-- Generate transformed app config in the intermediate directory -->
    <TransformXml Source="app.config" Destination="$(AppConfig)" Transform="app.$(Configuration).config" />
  </Target>

</Project>

1. Add an XML file for each configuration to the project.

Typically you will have Debug and Release configurations so name your files App.Debug.config and App.Release.config. In my project, I created a configuration for each kind of enironment so you might want to experiment with that.

2. Unload project and open .csproj file for editing

Visual Studio allows you to edit .csproj right in the editor—you just need to unload the project first. Then right-click on it and select Edit .csproj.

3. Bind App.*.config files to main App.config

Find the project file section that contains all App.config and App.*.config references and replace as follows. You'll notice we use None instead of Content.

<ItemGroup>
  <None Include="app.config"/>
  <None Include="app.Production.config">
    <DependentUpon>app.config</DependentUpon>
  </None>
  <None Include="app.QA.config">
    <DependentUpon>app.config</DependentUpon>
  </None>
  <None Include="app.Development.config">
    <DependentUpon>app.config</DependentUpon>
  </None>
</ItemGroup>

4. Activate transformations magic

In the end of file after

<Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" />

and before final

</Project>

insert the following XML:

<Import Project="AppConfigTransformation.targets" />

Done!

7
  • 1
    Tried in VS Community 2015 RC and it ignores the app.Debug.config file I have.
    – Khainestar
    Oct 29 '15 at 12:00
  • I successfully used the accepted answer on one WinForms project .. but for some baffling reason couldn't apply the accepted ans. to another WinForms project (all in the same solution). This answer from @bdeem is my new fave - as it correctly interoperated with my MSI project - big thanks!
    – bkwdesign
    Dec 6 '16 at 21:27
  • This didn't seem to work in VS 2015. I updated the VisualStudioVersion from 10 to 12 but no dice. Any ideas? Mar 2 '17 at 4:36
  • @Sinaesthetic Can you give us more details? VS 2015 Ultimate, Community, etc. VB.NET, C#, Any errors?
    – bdeem
    Mar 7 '17 at 21:21
  • VS2015 Enterprise. No errors whatsoever. It just doesn't do anything. Mar 7 '17 at 22:59
35

In my experience, the things I need to make environment-specific are things like connection strings, appsettings and often smpt settings. The config system allows to specify these things in separate files. So you can use this in your app.config/web.config:

 <appSettings configSource="appsettings.config" />
 <connectionStrings configSource="connection.config" />
 <system.net>
    <mailSettings>
       <smtp configSource="smtp.config"/>
    </mailSettings>
 </system.net>

What I typically do is to put these config-specific sections in separate files, in a subfolder called ConfigFiles (either in the solution root or at the project level, depends). I define a file per configuration, e.g. smtp.config.Debug and smtp.config.Release.

Then you can define a pre-build event like so:

copy $(ProjectDir)ConfigFiles\smtp.config.$(ConfigurationName) $(TargetDir)smtp.config

In team development, you can tweak this further by including the %COMPUTERNAME% and/or %USERNAME% in the convention.

Of course, this implies that the target files (x.config) should NOT be put in source control (since they are generated). You should still add them to the project file and set their output type property to 'copy always' or 'copy if newer' though.

Simple, extensible, and it works for all types of Visual Studio projects (console, winforms, wpf, web).

4
  • I have exactly the same configuration that you have. But I have problems transforming the smtp file. Can you incluye the original and tranformation? These are mine: The base file: <?xml version="1.0"?> <smtp deliveryMethod="SpecifiedPickupDirectory"> <specifiedPickupDirectory pickupDirectoryLocation="C:\mail"/> <network host="localhost"/> </smtp> The transformation: <?xml version="1.0"?> <smtp xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform" xdt:Transform="Replace" from="user@email.com" deliveryMethod="Network"> <network .../> </smtp>
    – jgarza
    Nov 25 '13 at 17:19
  • I'm not sure I understand. In this configuration I don't transform anything, it's just copying files...
    – jeroenh
    Nov 25 '13 at 20:40
  • Oh, I didn't see the copy part. I transform the config instead of just copying it. Thanks anyway.
    – jgarza
    Nov 26 '13 at 17:50
  • I like this solution. One small suggestion: In the copy example above the source and target arguments for copy should be surrounded by quotes; otherwise Pre-Build will fail for directories with space in their name
    – vandre
    Jun 24 '16 at 21:46
29

You can use a separate config file per configuration, e.g. app.Debug.config, app.Release.config and then use the configuration variable in your project file:

<PropertyGroup>
    <AppConfig>App.$(Configuration).config</AppConfig>
</PropertyGroup>

This will then create the correct ProjectName.exe.config file depending on the configuration you are building in.

2
  • Thanks, I didn't use your exact example to solve the problem I was having but your example did get me thinking and led me to another very similar soulution using the Copy task.
    – jpierson
    Nov 7 '12 at 20:47
  • Tried this under VS 2015 Community RC and it builds, but then ignores the content of the app.*.config I have added.
    – Khainestar
    Oct 29 '15 at 11:53
14

I wrote nice extension to automate app.config transformation like the one built in Web Application Project Configuration Transform

The biggest advantage of this extension is that you don’t need to install it on all build machines

2
  • 1
    Very useful extension, especially now that Slow Cheetah is entering maintenance mode and may not be supported in the future.
    – dthrasher
    Feb 27 '15 at 18:36
  • Yeah, folks should stop going to slow cheetah as the solution for this when this functionality is now supported by the transformxml msbuild task. A sw architect on my team introduced slow cheetah in an overzealous way to our project and created debug, stage, and release transforms of all of our configs, most of which needed no transformation. Needless to say, the moment he left I pulled slow cheetah out and now we just use a single transformxml task on the web.config. Ahhhhh, simplicity. Not to say that slow cheetah didn't have its time and place. Apr 28 '16 at 16:28
6

Install "Configuration Transform Tool" in Visual Studio from Marketplace and restart VS. You will be able to see menu preview transform for app.config as well.

https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=GolanAvraham.ConfigurationTransform

4
  • 1
    This works perfectly and requires very little effort or thinking. Much appreciated. thanks. (the 'preview transformation' dosn't work, but the 'add transformations' works perfectly without problem on VS 2017). Also seems to get updates often.
    – adudley
    Sep 5 '18 at 20:24
  • 1
    thank you so much for the solution, behind the scene, it does exactly what Dan Abramov has explained above, without getting your hand dirty Nov 19 '18 at 13:23
  • This is the ultimate solution. The preview seems to work just fine with VS 2019.
    – Kyle
    Jun 7 '19 at 14:33
  • 1
    I love it, but found it did not support other non app.config files without some editing of the csproj. Still great though to see the preview though.
    – Ian1971
    Mar 17 '20 at 11:44
4

Just a little improvement to the solution that seems to be posted everywhere now:

<UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll" />
  • that is, unless you are planning to stay with your current VS version forever
3
  • Can you please explain you answer a little or give sources to explain it?
    – roydukkey
    Aug 21 '13 at 15:46
  • 4
    Doesn't look like $(VisualStudioVersion) is set when using MSBuild directly. Oct 23 '13 at 14:36
  • This should be a comment to stackoverflow.com/a/5109530/2003763 (I've just added the same info as a comment there) May 11 '16 at 9:08
4

So I ended up taking a slightly different approach. I followed Dan's steps through step 3, but added another file: App.Base.Config. This file contains the configuration settings you want in every generated App.Config. Then I use BeforeBuild (with Yuri's addition to TransformXml) to transform the current configuration with the Base config into the App.config. The build process then uses the transformed App.config as normal. However, one annoyance is you kind of want to exclude the ever-changing App.config from source control afterwards, but the other config files are now dependent upon it.

  <UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll" />
  <Target Name="BeforeBuild" Condition="exists('app.$(Configuration).config')">
    <TransformXml Source="App.Base.config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" Destination="App.config" />
  </Target>
0
2

I have created another alternative to the one posted by Vishal Joshi where the requirement to change the build action to Content is removed and also implemented basic support for ClickOnce deployment. I say basic, because I didn't test it thoroughly but it should work in the typical ClickOnce deployment scenario.

The solution consists of a single MSBuild project that once imported to an existent windows application project (*.csproj) extends the build process to contemplate app.config transformation.

You can read a more detailed explanation at Visual Studio App.config XML Transformation and the MSBuild project file can be downloaded from GitHub.

1

If you use a TFS online(Cloud version) and you want to transform the App.Config in a project, you can do the following without installing any extra tools. From VS => Unload the project => Edit project file => Go to the bottom of the file and add the following:

<UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll" />
<Target Name="AfterBuild" Condition="Exists('App.$(Configuration).config')">
<TransformXml Source="App.config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" Destination="$(OutDir)\$(AssemblyName).dll.config" />

AssemblyFile and Destination works for local use and TFS online(Cloud) server.

1

proposed solution will not work when a class library with config file is referenced from another project (in my case it was Azure worker project library). It will not copy correct transformed file from obj folder into bin\##configuration-name## folder. To make it work with minimal changes, you need to change AfterCompile target to BeforeCompile:

<Target Name="BeforeCompile" Condition="exists('app.$(Configuration).config')">
1

Note: Due to reputation I cannot comment on bdeem's post. I'm posting my findings as an answer instead.

Following bdeem's post, I did the following (in order):

1. I modified the [project].csproj file. Added the <Content Include="" /> tags to the ItemGroup for the different config files and made them dependent on the original config file.

Note: Using <None Include="" /> will not work with the transformation.

<!-- App.config Settings -->
<!-- Create App.($Configuration).config files here. -->
<Content Include="App.config" />
<Content Include="App.Debug.config">
  <DependentUpon>App.config</DependentUpon>
</Content>
<Content Include="App.Release.config">
  <DependentUpon>App.config</DependentUpon>
</Content>

2. At the bottom of the [project].csproj file (before the closing </Project> tag), I imported the ${MSBuildToolsPath\Microsoft.CSharp.targets file, added the UsingTask to transform the XML and added the Target to copy the transformed App.config file to the output location.

Note: The Target will also overwrite the App.Config in the local directory to see immediate changes working locally. The Target also uses the Name="Afterbuild" property to ensure the config files can be transformed after the executables are generated. For reasons I do not understand, when using WCF endpoints, if I use Name="CoreCompile", I will get warnings about the service attributes. Name="Afterbuild" resolved this.

  <!-- Task to transform the App.config using the App.($Configuration).config file. -->
  <UsingTask TaskName="TransformXml" AssemblyFile="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\Web\Microsoft.Web.Publishing.Tasks.dll" />

  <!-- Only compile the App.config if the App.($Configuration).config file exists. -->
  <!-- Make sure to use the AfterBuild name instead of CoreCompile to avoid first time build errors and WCF endpoint errors. -->
  <Target Name="AfterBuild" Condition="exists('App.$(Configuration).config')">
    <!-- Generate transformed App.config in the intermediate output directory -->    
    <TransformXml Source="App.config" Destination="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" />
    
    <!-- Modify the original App.config file with the transformed version. -->
    <TransformXml Source="App.config" Destination="App.config" Transform="App.$(Configuration).config" />

    <!-- Force build process to use the transformed configuration file from now on. -->
    <ItemGroup>
      <AppConfigWithTargetPath Remove="App.config" />
      <AppConfigWithTargetPath Include="$(IntermediateOutputPath)$(TargetFileName).config">
        <TargetPath>$(TargetFileName).config</TargetPath>
      </AppConfigWithTargetPath>
    </ItemGroup>
  </Target>
</Project>

3. Went back into Visual Studio and reloaded the modified files.

4. Manually added the App.*.config files to the project. This allowed them to group under the original App.config file.

Note: Make sure the App.*.config files have the proper XML structure.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<!-- For more information on using web.config transformation visit https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=125889 -->

<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">
  <connectionStrings>
    <add name="myConn" connectionString=""; Initial Catalog=; User ID=; Password=;" xdt:Transform="SetAttributes" xdt:Locator="Match(name)" />
  </connectionStrings>
</configuration>

5. Re-built the project.

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