I have an app with the following services:

  • web/ - holds and runs a python 3 flask web server on port 5000. Uses sqlite3.
  • worker/ - has an index.js file which is a worker for a queue. the web server interacts with this queue using a json API over port 9730. The worker uses redis for storage. The worker also stores data locally in the folder worker/images/

Now this question only concerns the worker.

worker/Dockerfile

FROM node:0.12

WORKDIR /worker

COPY package.json /worker/
RUN npm install

COPY . /worker/

docker-compose.yml

redis:
    image: redis
worker:
    build: ./worker
    command: npm start
    ports:
        - "9730:9730"
    volumes:
        - worker/:/worker/
    links:
        - redis

When I run docker-compose build, everything works as expected and all npm modules are installed in /worker/node_modules as I'd expect.

npm WARN package.json unfold@1.0.0 No README data

> phantomjs@1.9.2-6 install /worker/node_modules/pageres/node_modules/screenshot-stream/node_modules/phantom-bridge/node_modules/phantomjs
> node install.js

<snip>

But when I do docker-compose up, I see this error:

worker_1 | Error: Cannot find module 'async'
worker_1 |     at Function.Module._resolveFilename (module.js:336:15)
worker_1 |     at Function.Module._load (module.js:278:25)
worker_1 |     at Module.require (module.js:365:17)
worker_1 |     at require (module.js:384:17)
worker_1 |     at Object.<anonymous> (/worker/index.js:1:75)
worker_1 |     at Module._compile (module.js:460:26)
worker_1 |     at Object.Module._extensions..js (module.js:478:10)
worker_1 |     at Module.load (module.js:355:32)
worker_1 |     at Function.Module._load (module.js:310:12)
worker_1 |     at Function.Module.runMain (module.js:501:10)

Turns out none of the modules are present in /worker/node_modules (on host or in the container).

If on the host, I npm install, then everything works just fine. But I don't want to do that. I want the container to handle dependencies.

What's going wrong here?

(Needless to say, all packages are in package.json.)

  • Did you end up finding a solution? – Justin Stayton Jun 18 '15 at 20:51
  • I did not, no... – Karan Goel Jun 21 '15 at 15:13
  • I think you should use the ONBUILD instruction... Like this: github.com/nodejs/docker-node/blob/master/0.12/onbuild/… – Lucas Pottersky Sep 25 '15 at 13:28
  • 1
    How would you do development on the host when the IDE does not know the node_module dependencies? – André Mar 27 '16 at 9:18
  • 1
    Try to remove volumes: - worker/:/worker/ block from docker-compose.yml file. This line overwrite the folder you make with COPY command. – Stepan S. Jun 28 '17 at 12:49

11 Answers 11

This happens because you have added your worker directory as a volume to your docker-compose.yml, as the volume is not mounted during the build.

When docker builds the image, the node_modules directory is created within the worker directory, and all the dependencies are installed there. Then on runtime the worker directory from outside docker is mounted into the docker instance (which does not have the installed node_modules), hiding the node_modules you just installed. You can verify this by removing the mounted volume from your docker-compose.yml.

A workaround is to use a data volume to store all the node_modules, as data volumes copy in the data from the built docker image before the worker directory is mounted. This can be done in the docker-compose.yml like this:

redis:
    image: redis
worker:
    build: ./worker
    command: npm start
    ports:
        - "9730:9730"
    volumes:
        - worker/:/worker/
        - /worker/node_modules
    links:
        - redis

I'm not entirely certain whether this imposes any issues for the portability of the image, but as it seems you are primarily using docker to provide a runtime environment, this should not be an issue.

If you want to read more about volumes, there is a nice user guide available here: https://docs.docker.com/userguide/dockervolumes/

  • 7
    great answer, least intrusive and great explanation! – kkemple Dec 3 '15 at 21:02
  • 19
    I've tried this method and hit the wall when dependencies changed. I've rebuilt the image, started new container and volume /worker/node_modules stayed the same as before (with old dependencies). Is there any trick how to use new volume upon rebuilding the image? – Ondrej Slinták Jun 18 '16 at 19:03
  • 5
    It seems docker compose doesn't remove volumes if other containers use them (even if they are dead). So if there are some dead containers of the same type (for whatever reason) the scenario I've described in previous comment follows. From what I've tried, using docker-compose rm seem to fix this problem, but I believe there must be a better and easier solution. – Ondrej Slinták Jun 18 '16 at 19:19
  • 3
    This solution is not great since it needs a docker rebuild --no-cache on every package.json change, which can happen pretty often. The proposal of double volume node_modules:/worker/node_modules seems interesting though. – Augustin Riedinger May 12 '17 at 13:00
  • 4
    Is there a solution in 2018 without having to rebuild --no-cache everytime the deps change? – Eelke Feb 8 at 13:59

The node_modules folder is overwritten by the volume and no more accessible in the container. I'm using the native module loading strategy to take out the folder from the volume:

/data/node_modules/ # dependencies installed here
/data/app/ # code base

Dockerfile:

COPY package.json /data/
WORKDIR /data/
RUN npm install
ENV PATH /data/node_modules/.bin:$PATH

COPY . /data/app/
WORKDIR /data/app/

node_modules is no accessible from outside the container because it is included in the image.

  • 1
    are there any downsides to this approach? Seems to work well for me. – Bret Fisher Feb 23 '17 at 10:27
  • 1
    node_modules is not accessible from outside of container but not really a downside ;) – jsan Feb 26 '17 at 9:55

The solution provided by @FrederikNS works, but I prefer to explicitly name my node_modules volume.

My project/docker-compose.yml file (docker-compose version 1.6+) :

version: '2'
services:
  frontend:
    ....
    build: ./worker
    volumes:
      - ./worker:/worker
      - node_modules:/worker/node_modules
    ....
volumes:
  node_modules:

my file structure is :

project/
   │── worker/
   │     └─ Dockerfile
   └── docker-compose.yml

It creates a volume named project_node_modules and re-use it every time I up my application.

My docker volume ls looks like this :

DRIVER              VOLUME NAME
local               project1_mysql
local               project1_node_modules
local               project2_postgresql
local               project2_node_modules
  • while this “works”, you’re circumventing a real concept in docker: all dependencies shoud be baked in for maximum portability. you cannot move this image without running other commands which kinda blows – Javier Buzzi Jan 24 at 8:13
  • 2
    tried to solve the same problem for hours and came up with the same solution my self. Your answer should be the highest rated, but I guess, ppl dont get your answer because you named your volume "node_modules" and all readers are missing the fact that this creates a new volume. When reading your code I thought that you just "re-mount" the locale node_modules folder and discarded that idea. Maybe you should edit the volume name to something like "container_node_modules" to make that clear. :) – user1781595 Nov 8 at 14:04

I recently had a similar problem. You can install node_modules elsewhere and set the NODE_PATH environment variable.

In the example below I installed node_modules into /install

worker/Dockerfile

FROM node:0.12

RUN ["mkdir", "/install"]

ADD ["./package.json", "/install"]
WORKDIR /install
RUN npm install --verbose
ENV NODE_PATH=/install/node_modules

WORKDIR /worker

COPY . /worker/

docker-compose.yml

redis:
    image: redis
worker:
    build: ./worker
    command: npm start
    ports:
        - "9730:9730"
    volumes:
        - worker/:/worker/
    links:
        - redis
  • stackoverflow.com/a/35825704/541961 :( – Dmitriy Nov 26 '16 at 16:55
  • stackoverflow.com/a/38601156/541961 – the solution – Dmitriy Nov 26 '16 at 17:20
  • 3
    The top voted solution by @FrederikNS is useful, was how I solved a different issue of my local volume overwriting the container's node_modules based on this article. But it led me to experience this issue. This solution here of creating a separate directory to copy your package.json to, run npm install there, then specify the NODE_PATH environment variable in docker-compose.yml to point to the node_modules folder of that directory works and feels right. – cwnewhouse Feb 13 at 18:58

UPDATE: Use the solution provided by @FrederikNS.

I encountered the same problem. When the folder /worker is mounted to the container - all of it's content will be syncronized (so the node_modules folder will disappear if you don't have it locally.)

Due to incompatible npm packages based on OS, I could not just install the modules locally - then launch the container, so..

My solution to this, was to wrap the source in a src folder, then link node_modules into that folder, using this index.js file. So, the index.js file is now the starting point of my application.

When I run the container, I mounted the /app/src folder to my local src folder.

So the container folder looks something like this:

/app
  /node_modules
  /src
    /node_modules -> ../node_modules
    /app.js
  /index.js

It is ugly, but it works..

  • 2
    oh, dear lord... i can't believe i'm also stuck with that! – Lucas Pottersky Sep 24 '15 at 20:54

There's elegant solution:

Just mount not whole directory, but only app directory. This way you'll you won't have troubles with npm_modules.

Example:

  frontend:
    build:
      context: ./ui_frontend
      dockerfile: Dockerfile.dev
    ports:
    - 3000:3000
    volumes:
    - ./ui_frontend/src:/frontend/src

Dockerfile.dev:

FROM node:7.2.0

#Show colors in docker terminal
ENV COMPOSE_HTTP_TIMEOUT=50000
ENV TERM="xterm-256color"

COPY . /frontend
WORKDIR /frontend
RUN npm install update
RUN npm install --global typescript
RUN npm install --global webpack
RUN npm install --global webpack-dev-server
RUN npm install --global karma protractor
RUN npm install
CMD npm run server:dev

Due to the way Node.js loads modules, node_modules can be anywhere in the path to your source code. For example, put your source at /worker/src and your package.json in /worker, so /worker/node_modules is where they're installed.

There is also some simple solution without mapping node_module directory into another volume. It's about to move installing npm packages into final CMD command.

Disadvantage of this approach:

  • run npm install each time you run container (switching from npm to yarn might also speed up this process a bit).

worker/Dockerfile

FROM node:0.12
WORKDIR /worker
COPY package.json /worker/
COPY . /worker/
CMD /bin/bash -c 'npm install; npm start'

docker-compose.yml

redis:
    image: redis
worker:
    build: ./worker
    ports:
        - "9730:9730"
    volumes:
        - worker/:/worker/
    links:
        - redis

Installing node_modules in container to different from project folder, and setting NODE_PATH to your node_modules folder helps me (u need to rebuild container).

I'm using docker-compose. My project file structure:

-/myproject
--docker-compose.yml
--nodejs/
----Dockerfile

docker-compose.yml:

version: '2'
services:
  nodejs:
    image: myproject/nodejs
    build: ./nodejs/.
    volumes:
      - ./nodejs:/workdir
    ports:
      - "23005:3000"
    command: npm run server

Dockerfile in nodejs folder:

FROM node:argon
RUN mkdir /workdir
COPY ./package.json /workdir/.
RUN mkdir /data
RUN ln -s /workdir/package.json /data/.
WORKDIR /data
RUN npm install
ENV NODE_PATH /data/node_modules/
WORKDIR /workdir
  • 1
    This is the best solution I've found. NODE_PATH was the key for me. – cdignam Jan 5 at 18:31

There are two seperate requirements I see for node dev environments... mount your source code INTO the container, and mount the node_modules FROM the container (for your IDE). To accomplish the first, you do the usual mount, but not everything... just the things you need

volumes:
    - worker/src:/worker/src
    - worker/package.json:/worker/package.json
    - etc...

( the reason to not do - /worker/node_modules is because docker-compose will persist that volume between runs, meaning you can diverge from what is actually in the image (defeating the purpose of not just bind mounting from your host)).

The second one is actually harder. My solution is a bit hackish, but it works. I have a script to install the node_modules folder on my host machine, and I just have to remember to call it whenever I update package.json (or, add it to the make target that runs docker-compose build locally).

install_node_modules:
    docker build -t building .
    docker run -v `pwd`/node_modules:/app/node_modules building npm install

In my opinion, we should not RUN npm install in the Dockerfile. Instead, we can start a container using bash to install the dependencies before runing the formal node service

docker run -it -v ./app:/usr/src/app  your_node_image_name  /bin/bash
root@247543a930d6:/usr/src/app# npm install
  • I actually agree with you on this one. Volumes are meant to be used when you want to share the data between container and host. When you decide to have your node_modules be persistent even after container remove, you should also know when or when not to do a npm install manually. OP suggests to do it on every image build. You can do that, but you don't need to also use a volume for that. On every build, the modules will be up to date anywys. – Blauhirn Mar 23 at 22:49

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