I am trying to use python to read input from a text file using mapper/reduce and to be outputted into many clusters using AWS EMR Hadoop(mapper). I want to output words based on the number of characters they have. Basically in the 4 lines of the if statements below, I want to output 4 kinds of words.

1.Extra long word contains 10+ characters.

2.Long word contains 7, 8 or 9 characters.

3.Medium word contains 4, 5 or 6 characters.

4 Short word contains 3, 2 or 1 characters.

This code does not seem to be working right, though, could anyone assist me with this? 'lword' is the word, if that helps. Thanks!

   if pattern.match(lword) and (len(lword) <= 10:
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

    if pattern.match(lword) and (len(lword) >= 7 || len(lword)<=9 :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

    if pattern.match(lword) and (len(lword) >= 4 || len(lword)<=6 :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

     if pattern.match(lword) and (len(lword) >= 1 || len(lword)<=3 :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)
  • 1
    Not working in what way? – TigerhawkT3 May 5 '15 at 6:15
  • You have four times the byte for byte exact same action. This does not make sense. – Stefan Pochmann May 5 '15 at 6:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You want to use and instead of '| |' in the last three word length tests. A more readable test is, for example, len(lword) in [7. 8. 9]

Also the first word length test should be >= 10 not <= 10.

So, assuming the print statements are placeholders for different actions depending on the size of lword:

if pattern.match(lword):
   if len(lword) >= 10:
       print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)
   elif len(lword) in [7, 8, 9] :
       print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)
   elif len(lword) in [4, 5, 6] :
       print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)
   else: # lword is between one and three characters long
       print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)
  • xrange is recommended over enumerating all the digits in a range – hd1 May 5 '15 at 6:25
  • My point was in regards to readability, and in this case spelling the numbers out in a list is slightly more readable imo – Craig Burgler May 5 '15 at 6:33
  • Thanks craig, your explanation makes sense. I'm new to Python, I will read up more on its basic syntax. – Jeevan Daniel Mahtani May 6 '15 at 8:48

Craig Burgler has already pointed out that your code is using invalid || syntax, and shown how to avoid testing pattern.match(lword) more times than you need to.

Another improvement you can make is to take advantage of the fact that comparisons in Python can be chained, so that, for example

x = 5
if 4 <= x <= 6:
    # True

Also, since you're going to be testing len(lword) more than once, it makes sense to store it in a variable rather than calculate it over and over again:

word_length = len(lword)

Finally, since it looks like you're doing something similar with lword whatever its length, you carry out that action after you've done your tests. Your final code might look something like this:

if pattern.match(lword):
    word_length = len(lword)
    if 1 <= word_length <= 3:
        category = 1
    elif 4 <= word_length <= 6:
        category = 2
    elif 7 <= word_length <= 9:
        category = 3
    elif word_length >= 10:
        category = 4
    else:
        category = 0  # lword is empty
    print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", category)
  • Thanks, im new to python, I shall read up on basic syntax! – Jeevan Daniel Mahtani May 6 '15 at 8:48

Take a look at this:

if (len(lword)) >= 10:
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

elif (len(lword) >= 7) and (len(lword) <= 9) :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

elif (len(lword) >= 4) and (len(lword) <= 6) :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

elif (len(lword) >= 1) and (len(lword) <= 3) :
        print '%s%s%d' % (lword, "\t", 1)

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