2

I have a java restful webservice program thats hosted on tomcat. In one of my web service methods, I load a big arraylist of objects (about 25,000 entries) from redis. This arraylist is updated once every 30 mins. There are multiple threads reading from this arraylist all the time. When, I update the arraylist I want to cause minimum disruption/delays since there could be other threads reading from it.

I was wondering what is the best way to do this? One way is to use synchronized keyword to the method that updates the list. But, the synchronized method has an overhead, since no threads can read while the update is going on. The update method itself could take few hundred millisecs since it involves reading from redis + deserialization.

class WebService {

 ArrayList<Entry> list = new ArrayList<Entry>();

    //need to call this every 30 mins.
    void syncrhonized updateArrayList(){
      //read from redis & add elements to list
    }

    void readFromList(){
      for(Entry e: list) {
       //do some processing
      }
    }

}

Updated the final solution: I ended up using no explicit synchronization primitives.

4
  • Maybe a CopyOnWriteArrayList helps? May 5 '15 at 6:39
  • 1
    @Seelenvirtuose - I think a CopyOnWriteArrayList would be inefficient here because updates are happening only once in 30 minutes. synchronized blocks are the way to go. May 5 '15 at 6:40
  • 1
    @TheLostMind Most likely, you are right. Just wanted to offer an alternative. OP must choose what fits best. May 5 '15 at 6:42
  • It is a very typical use case for ReadWriteLock. Please refer to my answer May 5 '15 at 8:12
3

Does it have to be the same List instance getting updated? Can you build a new list every 30 minutes and replace a volatile reference?

Something along these lines:

class WebService {
    private volatile List<Entry> theList;

    void updateList() {
        List<Entry> newList = getEntriesFromRedis();
        theList = Collections.unmodifiableList(newList);
    }

    public List<Entry> getList() {
        return theList;
    }
}

The advantage of this approach is that you don't have to do any other synchronization anywhere else.

8
  • That's what I was thinking about.. +1 .. remove synchronization completely, yet ensure a happens-before . Making the list unmodifiable improves performance.. But reads should be blocked while updation is happening. Else, there will be memory inconsistencies. Assume thread-1 is working on a value in the old list.. Then update is called by another thread. Thread-1 will still be working on the value from previous list. What if that value is not present in the new list?. I think all reads should be completed and only then an update should start May 5 '15 at 7:28
  • 1
    Assuming that the list is not trying to be consistent with anything outside itself, it might be perfectly okay for request already in progress to finish with the old version of the list. Can't be sure without knowing the OPs requirements.
    – Misha
    May 5 '15 at 7:31
  • Ya.. If there is no problem with some inconsistencies, then this solution will work better than using CopyOnWriteArrayList or `synchronization mechanisms* May 5 '15 at 7:34
  • 1
    The biggest possible source of problems is if the OP isn't telling the entire story and in addition to this List, some other data is also getting loaded from redis into some other structure. In that case it will be possible for the same client to observe the old copy of one structure and the new copy of the other structure.
    – Misha
    May 5 '15 at 7:40
  • 1
    There is a penalty for using a volatile variable but it's measured in nanoseconds and it's certainly going to be lower than any synchronization. By replacing the list instead of modifying it, you sidestep the issue with other threads reading while update happens. The client who started reading the old list will continue to read it. Next client will read the updated list.
    – Misha
    May 5 '15 at 18:18
1

A reader-writer lock (or ReadWriteLock in Java) is what you need.

A reader-writer lock will allow concurrent access for read operations, but mutually exclusive access for write.

It will look something like

class WebService {
    final ReentrantReadWriteLock listRwLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    ArrayList<Entry> list = new ArrayList<Entry>();

    //need to call this every 30 mins.
    void updateArrayList(){
        listRwLock.writeLock().lock();
        try {
            //read from redis & add elements to list
        } finally {
            listRwLock.writeLock().unlock()
        }
    }

    void readFromList(){
        listRwLock.readLock().lock();
        try {
            for(Entry e: list) {
                //do some processing
            }
        } finally {
            listRwLock.readLock().unlock()
        }

    }

}
0

Here is the solution I finally ended up with,

class WebService {

 // key = timeWindow (for ex:10:00 or 10:30 or 11:00), value = <List of entries for that timewindow>
 ConcurrentHashMap<String, List<Entry>> map= new ConcurrentHashMap<String, List<Entry>>();

    //have setup a timer to call this every 10 mins.
    void updateArrayList(){
     // populate the map for the next time window with the corresponding entries. So that its ready before we start using it. Also, clean up the expired entries for older time windows.

    }

    void readFromList(){
      list = map.get(currentTimeWindow)
      for(Entry e: list) {
       //do some processing
      }
    }

} 
2
  • where is currentTimeWindow coming from?
    – Misha
    May 14 '15 at 1:49
  • currentTimeWindow is a local variable derived using date from java.util
    – plspl
    May 14 '15 at 20:05
-1

ArrayList is not thread safe.. You must use vector List to make it thread safe.

You can also use Thread safe Array list by using Collections Api but I would recommend vector list since it already provides you what you want.

 //Use Collecions.synzhonizedList method
 List list = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList());
 ...

 //If you wanna use iterator on the synchronized list, use it
 //like this. It should be in synchronized block.
 synchronized (list) {
   Iterator iterator = list.iterator();
   while (iterator.hasNext())
   ...
  iterator.next();
  ...
}

I would recommend you to through this: http://beginnersbook.com/2013/12/difference-between-arraylist-and-vector-in-java/

2
  • In the above case, it looks like list is synchronized for reads also... wouldn't it slow down my reads? Since every thread has to acquire a lock to read? I want my reads to happen concurrently since the list remains immutable for the most part.
    – plspl
    May 5 '15 at 6:55
  • 1
    @plspl - No. Don't use Synchronized datastructures. A list is fine (although I would code to the interface rather than the implementation.. Anyways). I would rather synchronize on the critical sections of readFromList() and updateArrayList() . Escape analysis will bring about lock elision. So, synchronization which is unnecessary will usually be removed by the JIT / JVM. ALthough I doubt whether it will happen in your case. May 5 '15 at 7:03

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