69

I am trying to write the following query on postgresql:

select name, author_id, count(1), 
    (select count(1)
    from names as n2
    where n2.id = n1.id
        and t2.author_id = t1.author_id
    )               
from names as n1
group by name, author_id

This would certainly work on Microsoft SQL Server but it does not at all on postegresql. I read its documentation a bit and it seems I could rewrite it as:

select name, author_id, count(1), total                     
from names as n1, (select count(1) as total
    from names as n2
    where n2.id = n1.id
        and n2.author_id = t1.author_id
    ) as total
group by name, author_id

But that returns the following error on postegresql: "subquery in FROM cannot refer to other relations of same query level". So I'm stuck. Does anyone know how I can achieve that?

Thanks

  • Actually it seems like this should work on Postgres (maybe 6 years ago it didn't :) ) – qwertzguy Aug 7 '16 at 23:00
100

I'm not sure I understand your intent perfectly, but perhaps the following would be close to what you want:

select n1.name, n1.author_id, count_1, total_count
  from (select id, name, author_id, count(1) as count_1
          from names
          group by id, name, author_id) n1
inner join (select id, author_id, count(1) as total_count
              from names
              group by id, author_id) n2
  on (n2.id = n1.id and n2.author_id = n1.author_id)

Unfortunately this adds the requirement of grouping the first subquery by id as well as name and author_id, which I don't think was wanted. I'm not sure how to work around that, though, as you need to have id available to join in the second subquery. Perhaps someone else will come up with a better solution.

Share and enjoy.

  • Perfect Bob, that really worked. Thanks a lot! I had to make a slight change because I don't need the join with the id, just the author_id. So the final query is: select n1.name, n1.author_id, count_1, total_count from (select id, name, author_id, count(1) as count_1 from names group by id, name, author_id) n1 inner join (select author_id, count(1) as total_count from names group by author_id) n2 on (n2.author_id = n1.author_id) Now that I have this, what I really want is to divide count_1 by total_count to have a normalized frequency. =D – Ricardo Jun 9 '10 at 12:00
  • ops, just realized the sql does not get formatted properly here. :( Will give an answer to complement. – Ricardo Jun 9 '10 at 12:02
  • I didn't have the problem Ricado was talking 'bout but this SQL totally fixed my problems ... :D THANK YOU !!! – tftd Mar 21 '11 at 20:22
12

I am just answering here with the formatted version of the final sql I needed based on Bob Jarvis answer as posted in my comment above:

select n1.name, n1.author_id, cast(count_1 as numeric)/total_count
  from (select id, name, author_id, count(1) as count_1
          from names
          group by id, name, author_id) n1
inner join (select author_id, count(1) as total_count
              from names
              group by author_id) n2
  on (n2.author_id = n1.author_id)
7

Complementing @Bob Jarvis and @dmikam answer, Postgres don't perform a good plan when you don't use LATERAL, below a simulation, in both cases the query data results are the same, but the cost are very different

Table structure

CREATE TABLE ITEMS (
    N INTEGER NOT NULL,
    S TEXT NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO ITEMS
  SELECT
    (random()*1000000)::integer AS n,
    md5(random()::text) AS s
  FROM
    generate_series(1,1000000);

CREATE INDEX N_INDEX ON ITEMS(N);

Performing JOIN with GROUP BY in subquery without LATERAL

EXPLAIN 
SELECT 
    I.*
FROM ITEMS I
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT 
        COUNT(1), n
    FROM ITEMS
    GROUP BY N
) I2 ON I2.N = I.N
WHERE I.N IN (243477, 997947);

The results

Merge Join  (cost=0.87..637500.40 rows=23 width=37)
  Merge Cond: (i.n = items.n)
  ->  Index Scan using n_index on items i  (cost=0.43..101.28 rows=23 width=37)
        Index Cond: (n = ANY ('{243477,997947}'::integer[]))
  ->  GroupAggregate  (cost=0.43..626631.11 rows=861418 width=12)
        Group Key: items.n
        ->  Index Only Scan using n_index on items  (cost=0.43..593016.93 rows=10000000 width=4)

Using LATERAL

EXPLAIN 
SELECT 
    I.*
FROM ITEMS I
INNER JOIN LATERAL (
    SELECT 
        COUNT(1), n
    FROM ITEMS
    WHERE N = I.N
    GROUP BY N
) I2 ON 1=1 --I2.N = I.N
WHERE I.N IN (243477, 997947);

Results

Nested Loop  (cost=9.49..1319.97 rows=276 width=37)
  ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on items i  (cost=9.06..100.20 rows=23 width=37)
        Recheck Cond: (n = ANY ('{243477,997947}'::integer[]))
        ->  Bitmap Index Scan on n_index  (cost=0.00..9.05 rows=23 width=0)
              Index Cond: (n = ANY ('{243477,997947}'::integer[]))
  ->  GroupAggregate  (cost=0.43..52.79 rows=12 width=12)
        Group Key: items.n
        ->  Index Only Scan using n_index on items  (cost=0.43..52.64 rows=12 width=4)
              Index Cond: (n = i.n)

My Postgres version is PostgreSQL 10.3 (Debian 10.3-1.pgdg90+1)

  • 1
    Thanks for the hint to using LATERAL!! – leole Aug 6 at 8:24
6

I know this is old, but since Postgresql 9.3 there is an option to use a keyword "LATERAL" to use RELATED subqueries inside of JOINS, so the query from the question would look like:

SELECT 
    name, author_id, count(*), t.total
FROM
    names as n1
    INNER JOIN LATERAL (
        SELECT 
            count(*) as total
        FROM 
            names as n2
        WHERE 
            n2.id = n1.id
            AND n2.author_id = n1.author_id
    ) as t ON 1=1
GROUP BY 
    n1.name, n1.author_id
  • 1
    I wonder if the performance of these two queries have difference, or if for postgresql it is the same plan – deFreitas Mar 21 '18 at 12:31
  • 1
    I did this test and the answer is here (my answer) – deFreitas Mar 24 '18 at 3:44
0
select n1.name, n1.author_id, cast(count_1 as numeric)/total_count
  from (select id, name, author_id, count(1) as count_1
          from names
          group by id, name, author_id) n1
inner join (select distinct(author_id), count(1) as total_count
              from names) n2
  on (n2.author_id = n1.author_id)
Where true

used distinct if more inner join, because more join group performance is slow

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