45

I'm trying to create a round directional arrow with CSS and HTML. Below are my attempts.

Attempt 1

In this I have rotated the <div> and an arrow, but both are in different positions.

This is the CSS:

 #curves div {
   width: 100px;
   height: 100px;
   border: 5px solid #999;
 }
 #curves.width div {
   border-color: transparent transparent transparent #999;
 }
 #curve1 {
   -moz-border-radius: 50px 0 0 50px;
   border-radius: 50px 0 0 50px;
 }
 .arrow-right {
   width: 0;
   height: 0;
   border-top: 10px solid transparent;
   border-bottom: 10px solid transparent;
   border-left: 27px solid #ccc;
   float: right;
   margin-top: -7px;
   margin-right: -26px;
 }
<div id="curves" class="width">
  <div id="curve1"></div><span class="arrow-right"></span>
</div>

Attempt 2

In this the arrow I have created is straight.

.container {
  width: 60%;
  height: 9px;
  background: #ccc;
  margin: 100px auto;
  -moz-border-radius: 50px 0 0 50px;
  border-radius: 50px 0 0 50px;
}
.arrow-right {
  width: 0;
  height: 0;
  border-top: 10px solid transparent;
  border-bottom: 10px solid transparent;
  border-left: 27px solid #ccc;
  float: right;
  margin-top: -7px;
  margin-right: -26px;
}
<div class="container">
  </span><span class="arrow-right"></span>
</div>

Update I want it something like this

Enter image description here

  • Well... it's actually not really HTML code, but maybe you can find what you want with the SVG tag (here is a SVG drawer : svg-edit.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/editor/svg-editor.html#group . you can see the code by clicking the vertical SVG button, and just copy/paste it.) – Seblor May 5 '15 at 9:38
  • 9
    It looks like a job for SVG or an icon font, not for CSS. – rr- May 5 '15 at 10:20
  • 1
    I'm not questioning your reasons for asking what you have... I'm curious as to what scenario you would need this instead of something as simple as an icon font such as fortawesome.github.io/Font-Awesome/icons – Reece May 5 '15 at 23:02
  • i don't want to use any image . that's why . – Manoj Kumar May 6 '15 at 4:04
54

You could use a pseudo element to generate the triangle (using the famous border hack).

After that, you would be able to use a thick border on the actual element (with a border-radius of 50% to make it a circle). This allows you to rotate the arrow to your liking.

div {
  border: 20px solid transparent;
  border-top-color: black;
  border-left-color: black;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  position: relative;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
  margin:30px auto;
}
div:before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: -20px;
  left: 80%;
  height: 0;
  width: 0;
  border-left: 30px solid black;
  border-top: 30px solid transparent;
  border-bottom: 30px solid transparent;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}


/*BELOW IS FOR DEMO ONLY*/

div:hover {
  -webkit-transform: rotate(315deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(315deg);
  transform: rotate(315deg);
  transition: all 0.8s;
}
html {
  text-align:center;
  color:white;
  font-size:30px;
  height: 100%;
  background: rgb(79, 79, 79);
  /* Old browsers */
  background: -moz-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(radial, center center, 0px, center center, 100%, color-stop(0%, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1)), color-stop(100%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1)));
  /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* Opera 12+ */
  background: -ms-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* IE10+ */
  background: radial-gradient(ellipse at center, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* W3C */
  filter: progid: DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#4f4f4f', endColorstr='#222222', GradientType=1);
  /* IE6-9 fallback on horizontal gradient */
}
HOVER ME
<div></div>


If you then wanted to lengthen the arrow, you could make the bottom border visible. For example;

div {
  border: 20px solid transparent;
  border-top-color: black;
  border-left-color: black;
  border-bottom-color: black;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  position: relative;
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
  margin:30px auto;
}
div:before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: -20px;
  left: 80%;
  height: 0;
  width: 0;
  border-left: 30px solid black;
  border-top: 30px solid transparent;
  border-bottom: 30px solid transparent;
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}


/*BELOW IS FOR DEMO ONLY*/

div:hover {
  transform: rotate(315deg);
  transition: all 0.8s;
}
html {
  text-align:center;
  color:white;
  font-size:30px;
  height: 100%;
  background: rgb(79, 79, 79);
  /* Old browsers */
  background: -moz-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* FF3.6+ */
  background: -webkit-gradient(radial, center center, 0px, center center, 100%, color-stop(0%, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1)), color-stop(100%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1)));
  /* Chrome,Safari4+ */
  background: -webkit-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* Chrome10+,Safari5.1+ */
  background: -o-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* Opera 12+ */
  background: -ms-radial-gradient(center, ellipse cover, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* IE10+ */
  background: radial-gradient(ellipse at center, rgba(79, 79, 79, 1) 0%, rgba(34, 34, 34, 1) 100%);
  /* W3C */
  filter: progid: DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#4f4f4f', endColorstr='#222222', GradientType=1);
  /* IE6-9 fallback on horizontal gradient */
}
HOVER ME
<div></div>

  • 2
    You can get some interesting effects on the shaft of the arrow too - try border-width: 20px 20px 0 10px; border-style: solid; border-color: black transparent transparent black; – Niet the Dark Absol May 6 '15 at 6:39
  • @NiettheDarkAbsol: That's pretty cool :) With an increasing interest in the css-shapes, I wonder could you tell me how you came across this question? – jbutler483 May 6 '15 at 8:06
  • It was in the Hot Network Questions list ^_^ – Niet the Dark Absol May 6 '15 at 8:08
  • @NiettheDarkAbsol: Cheers. Was wondering where all the views were coming from :P – jbutler483 May 6 '15 at 8:11
26

SVG solution

The shape is really simple to create in SVG.

For the svg interested:

<svg width="200px" height="200px" viewbox="0 0 400 400">
  <path stroke="#000" stroke-width="50" fill="none"
        d="M200 350 A 100 100 0 0 1 200 150
           M200 150 200 125 225 150 200 175Z"/>
</svg>

Can i use it?

  • 1
    That's a good option, but not every browser has SVG support. With CSS it is harder to produce the same results. And with PIE.htc, you don't need to worry about browser support anymore. But with SVG, you need some external plugins or Flash to render it in old IE versions. But I like how easy it looks. – Ismael Miguel May 5 '15 at 14:39
  • 2
    svg is not supported in IE8 and below. – Persijn May 5 '15 at 15:50
  • 8
    Thankfully, IE <= 8 collectively take up less than 2.5% of browsers. I'd say the Web has moved on from these by now. With that in mind, I'm going to start dropping support for IE older than 8 and encourage everyone else to do so as well. – Michael Cordingley May 5 '15 at 19:00
  • 3
    People should stop being afraid of SVG. Hacking HTML rectangles can only go so far... – Kobi May 6 '15 at 8:49
  • As a side note, SVG can be animated and styled using CSS. The combination allows the simplicity of SVG for icon content with the style control of CSS. Animating SVG – Huski May 6 '15 at 14:22
9

I have created this little thing in CSS, you can look at the code to see how it works.

Note: this does need a solid background.

.arrow {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  border: 6px solid;
  border-radius: 50%;
  position: relative;
}
.arrow:before {
  content: "";
  display: block;
  width: 10px;
  height: 50px;
  background: #fff;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
  top: 0;
  right: -6px;
  margin: auto;
}
.arrow:after {
  content: "";
  width: 0;
  height: 0;
  border-left: 20px solid transparent;
  border-right: 20px solid transparent;
  border-top: 20px solid #000;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 106px;
  right: -20px;
}
<div class="arrow"></div>

  • can i reduce this to less than half circle?? – Manoj Kumar May 5 '15 at 9:46
  • 1
    I started this before your question was updated with the image, I would have done it in the same way as jbutler483 had I seen it. – Ruddy May 5 '15 at 9:47
6

Here's another way to do it using clip-paths instead of messing around with borders.

Demo - http://jsfiddle.net/r8rd0yde/4/

.arrow {
  position: relative;
  padding: 20px;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
}
.circle {
  position: absolute;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  border: 15px solid #000;
  border-radius: 50%;
  -webkit-clip-path: inset(0 50% 0 0);
  clip-path: inset(0 50% 0 0);
}
.triangle {
  position: absolute;
  width: 35px;
  height: 30px;
  background: #000;
  margin-top: -6px;
  margin-left: 38px;
  -webkit-clip-path: polygon(50% 0, 0% 100%, 100% 100%);
  clip-path: polygon(50% 0, 0% 100%, 100% 100%);
  -moz-transform: rotate(90deg);
  -webkit-transform: rotate(90deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(90deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(90deg);
  transform: rotate(90deg);
}
/* JUST FOR DEMO */

.arrow:hover {
  -webkit-transform: rotate(720deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(720deg);
  transform: rotate(720deg);
  transition: all 1.2s;
}
<div class="arrow">
  <div class="circle"></div>
  <div class="triangle"></div>
</div>

  • this is also very nice .. +1 – Manoj Kumar May 7 '15 at 4:05
5

You can use the Clockwise open circle arrow (U+21BB) character:

.arrow {
  display: inline-block;
  font-size: 300px;
  line-height: 200px;
  font-weight: bold;
  transform: rotate(90deg);
}
<span class="arrow">↻</span>

1
#curvedarrow {
  position: relative;
  width: 0;
  height: 0;
  border-top: 9px solid transparent;
  border-right: 9px solid red;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(10deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(10deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(10deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(10deg);
}
#curvedarrow:after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  border: 0 solid transparent;
  border-top: 3px solid red;
  border-radius: 20px 0 0 0;
  top: -12px;
  left: -9px;
  width: 12px;
  height: 12px;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(45deg);
}

I found this in https://css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS/

It may not be the exact shape you want but it's definately a good starting point.

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