I am trying to use a trait that has a function that takes a closure as argument, and then use it on a trait object.

trait A {
    fn f<P>(&self, p: P) where P: Fn() -> ();
}

struct B {
    a: Box<A>
}

impl B {
    fn c(&self) {
        self.a.f(|| {});
    }
}

This snippet generates the following error:

the trait `A` is not implemented for the type `A` [E0277]

The version of rustc is rustc 1.0.0-beta.3 (5241bf9c3 2015-04-25) (built 2015-04-25).

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is that method f is not object-safe because it is generic, and hence it can't be called on a trait object. You will have to force its users to pass boxed closure:

trait A {
    fn f(&self, p: Box<Fn() -> ()>);
}

I wonder why Rust allows Box<A> in the first place, I would expect an error there. And this particular error is really misleading. I would file a bug about this.

Alternatively, you can discard trait objects in favor of regular bounded generics, though it is not always possible.

  • 1
    Isn't Box<TraitA> legal in Rust? – Daniel Fath May 5 '15 at 15:11
  • 1
    @DanielFath: the point is that Box<A> is approximately useless because A is not object safe—you can’t actually do anything with it. – Chris Morgan May 5 '15 at 15:13
  • @ChrisMorgan Interesting. Can you point me to more resource on what object safe means and what is and isn't object safe? – Daniel Fath May 5 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    Here's a blog post on the topic by huon: huonw.github.io/blog/2015/01/object-safety – bluss May 5 '15 at 19:01
  • 1
    Note that you can actually use a reference (&) instead of a Box if you want to use the stack instead of the heap. I.e. fn f(&self, p: &Fn() -> ());. Apparently this is still called a 'boxed closure', despite not using a Box. In this context, 'boxed' just means it's a pointer type. – Cam Jackson Jun 22 '15 at 11:39

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